Recurrent Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (rCDAD) Research Study Begins Enrollment

A research consortium across multiple institutions has begun enrolling patients in a clinical trial examining whether fecal microbiota transplantation by enema is safe and effective in preventing recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated disease, according to a press release.

The researchers hope to enroll 162 volunteers aged 18 years or older who have had two or more episodes of C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD) within the past 6 months, according to the release.

Trial sites include Emory University, Duke University Medical Center and Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

Each site is a member of the Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit, which is a network funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).

The researchers hope to enroll 162 volunteers aged 18 years or older who have had two or more episodes of C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD) within the past 6 months, according to the release.

Clostridium difficile-associated disease, a significant problem in health care facilities, causes an estimated 15,000 deaths in the United States each year,” Anthony S. Fauci, MD, NIAID director, said in the release. “This randomized, controlled trial aims to provide critical data on the efficacy and long-term safety of using fecal microbiota transplants by enema to cure C. diff infections.”

Volunteers will be enrolled in the trial after completing a standard course of antibiotics for a recurrent CDAD episode, presuming their diarrhea symptoms cease on treatment.

Participants will then be randomly assigned to either a group (n = 108) that will take an anti-diarrheal medication and receive a stool transplant (FMT) delivered by retention enema, or a group (n = 54) that will take an anti-diarrheal medication and receive a placebo solution delivered by retention enema.

The placebo is a saline solution that has been colored to mimic an active stool transplant product, to ensure that the study is partially blinded.

Researchers will collect stool and blood samples from participating at designated intervals for a year from the date of effective treatment for CDAD, or from the date of their last treatment if it was unsuccessful, according to the release.

Investigators will evaluate the stool samples for gut microbial diversity and infectious pathogens changes and will examine the blood samples for metabolic syndrome markers.

All participants will be monitored for adverse side effects for 3 years following the completion of recurrent CDAD treatment.

Source:  https://www.healio.com/gastroenterology/infection/news/online/%7B1402ede4-5de1-40a3-b23f-a0070e01ad7a%7D/trial-testing-fmt-for-recurrent-diarrheal-disease-begins