Author Archives: cdifffoundation

Do You Have A Penicillin Allergy? Fact or Fiction

Are you allergic to penicillin? If so, are you sure about that?

It’s surprisingly common for people to wrongly think they have a penicillin allergy — and that misconception can be dangerous for their health.

Ten percent of all patients in the United States claim to have a penicillin allergy. Of those people, 90 percent are not truly allergic and can tolerate the drug. That means millions of people take alternative antibiotics, which are more expensive and can put their health and potentially the health of others at risk. The solution is a simple allergy test.

A study in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) looked at six years’ worth of medical records for patients in the United Kingdom and found that those with a penicillin allergy had an almost 70 percent greater chance of acquiring a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection and a 26 percent increased risk of Clostridium difficile-related colitis (C. diff.). MRSA and C. diff. are major health risks worldwide. The study compared adults with a known penicillin allergy to similar people without a known penicillin allergy.

People labeled with a penicillin allergy are usually instead given broad-spectrum antibiotics, which may kill off more good bacteria along with the bad. This appeared to increase a patient’s risk of infection with MRSA or C. diff., which are common in our environment and can live without causing any problems on someone’s skin or gut. However, if a broad antibiotic kills off competing good bacteria, MRSA and C. diff. can thrive and start to cause problems.

“Penicillin-related drugs, that whole class … they’re very effective at killing, and they’re very targeted. So for some bacteria they’re still the best. Oldie but goody,” said Kim Blumenthal, lead author of the new study and assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

“I have seen so many terrible, terrible outcomes” from C. diff. infections, Blumenthal said, including serious diarrhea, sepsis and death.

“All of us need to understand that antibiotic use is not a free ride, it carries a lot of risk,” said Paul Sax, clinical director of infectious diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He was not involved in the study but he says the study adds to the “substantial body of evidence” which shows that a penicillin allergy has been linked to longer hospital stays and an increased risk of acquiring resistant infections.

Using non-targeted antibiotics can quickly breed resistant bacteria. “Not only is it harmful to the world and the general population . . . but it’s harmful to the individual patient. So the message to the public is that it could be dangerous to you or me,” said Helen Boucher, director of the Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program at Tufts Medical Center, who was not involved in the study.

“In antibiotic resistance we don’t have a very loud patient advocacy voice . . . and the reasons for that are complicated, but a lot of it has to do with the fact that a lot of the victims aren’t here to speak for themselves because they died,” Boucher said.

The infections are resistant to many known drugs and can quickly become life-threatening. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2 million people, equivalent to the approximate population of Brooklyn, are infected with resistant bacteria every year. At least 23,000 people die each year as a direct result and even more from complications. 

Diagnosing penicillin allergies is challenging. Symptoms such as a rash, nausea or diarrhea could be a sign of allergy, or they might coincidentally occur when someone is taking antibiotics, according to Jonathan Grein, medical director at the Department of Hospital Epidemiology at Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Children frequently get rashes that are mistaken for penicillin allergies, Blumenthal said.

Even if people are diagnosed correctly as children, they can grow out of an allergy, said Sax.

Which raises the question, what exactly is an allergy? The Internet is full of “answers,” as any late-night Googling hypochondriac can tell you, but an allergy is simply an exaggerated immune response triggered unnecessarily. It can be anything from a rash to trouble breathing.

“Part of the problem is that ‘allergy’ means different things to different people,” said Grein. “Making that distinction between these intolerances and side effects and life-threatening immediate allergic reaction, that’s where the challenge is.”

For example, a patient of Sax’s, in his mid-20s, had a life-threatening heart infection. Penicillin could save him, but his medical record said he was allergic to the drug. Careful questioning by his medical team was able to determine that although he had nausea and diarrhea while on penicillin, he did not have an allergy, Sax said. Knowing this, the hospital administered the appropriate penicillin antibiotic to save his life.

In the case of penicillin, it is important to know that the risks of the allergy diagnosis are sometimes worse than the symptoms of the allergy itself. In most cases, penicillin should only be avoided if the allergy is immediate and life-threatening.

“There are over 30 million Americans who have a penicillin allergy on their record. And there are things we can do,” Blumenthal said.

Examine your own medical record, Blumenthal said. “I would want patients to think, ‘Hmm, am I really allergic to penicillin, or did my mom just tell me and it’s not really true, and should I get that evaluated?’ ”

If it’s been more than 10 years since you were diagnosed, talk to your doctor about getting retested.

Please click on the following link to review the article in its entirety

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2018/08/10/most-people-who-think-they-have-a-penicillin-allergy-are-wrong-thats-dangerous/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.47ced452875d

C Diff Foundation’s Health Education Clinic Has Flourished Over Recent Year With the Support From Nursing Students

On Wednesday, August 1st the senior Nursing students from
Rasmussen College attended the Foundation’s
bi-weekly Health Education Clinic in Florida where they were given the opportunity to expand their knowledge base focused on C.difficile (C.diff.)  Infections, Clinical Trials, Sepsis,  and
Antibiotic Stewardship while utilizing their skills with hands on practice.  The students add a new public health topic each month during the Health Education Clinic that benefit the local residents of Pasco County, Florida. The Health Education Clinic began in June 2017 and has proven beneficial to the local citizens to learn more about C.difficile infection prevention, treatments, clinical trials, environmental safety, support, Sepsis, and other leading Healthcare-acquired infections — to name a few MRSA, VRSA.  The Nursing Students, with their clinical faculty member,  introduce topics of hydration, nutrition, diabetes, hypertension, and display their proficiency in blood-pressure monitoring during clinic.

“It has been gratifying to witness the positive changes taking place in the resident’s health over the past year.  We extend our gratitude to the Rasmussen Colleges for incorporating our community program into their student’s curriculum/clinical experience to learn more about our mission from our members and for providing public health educational material to the local community,” stated Nancy Caralla, Founding President of the C Diff Foundation. “The program is mutually beneficial with outstanding results being produced.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are grateful for Rasmussen College, and their Nursing Students, for the continued support of this community outreach program.

Veteran Affairs Patients with Recurrent C.difficile Infections Participate In Study

 

 

 

 

Though recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) are common and pose a major clinical concern, data are lacking regarding mortality among patients who survive their initial CDI and have subsequent recurrences. Risk factors for mortality in patients with recurrent CDI are largely unknown.

Methods

Veterans Affairs patients with a first CDI (positive C. difficile toxin(s) stool sample and ≥ 2 days CDI treatment) were included (2010–2014). Subsequent recurrences were defined as additional CDI episodes ≥ 14 days after the stool test date and within 30 days of end of treatment. A matched (1:4) case-control analysis was conducted using multivariable conditional logistic regression to identify predictors of all-cause mortality within 30 days of the first recurrence.

Results

Crude 30-day all-cause mortality rates were 10.6% for the initial CDI episode, 8.3% for first recurrence, 4.2% for second recurrence, and 5.9% for third recurrence. Among 110 cases and 440 controls six predictors of mortality were identified: use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, odds ratio [OR] 3.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.14–6.96), any antibiotic (OR 3.33, 95% CI 1.79–6.17), respiratory failure (OR 8.26, 95% CI 1.71–39.92), congitive dysfunction (OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.02–5.72), nutrition deficiency (OR 2.91, 95% CI 1.37–6.21), and age (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01–1.07).

Conclusion

In our national cohort of Veterans, crude mortality decreased by 44% from the initial episode to the third recurrence. Treatment with antibiotics, PPIs, and underlying co-morbidities were important predictors of mortality in recurrent CDI. Our study assists healthcare providers in identifying patients at high risk of death after CDI recurrence.

To view article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://academic.oup.com/ofid/advance-article/doi/10.1093/ofid/ofy175/5056240

Researchers Examine Changes to the Microbiota Composition and Metabolic Profiles of Patients with Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection (rCDI) Following Treatment with Faecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT)

Objectives

This study aimed to examine changes to the microbiota composition and metabolic profiles of seven patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI), following treatment with faecal microbiota transplant (FMT).

Summary

Objectives

This study aimed to examine changes to the microbiota composition and metabolic profiles of seven patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI), following treatment with faecal microbiota transplant (FMT).

Methods

16S rDNA sequencing and 1H NMR were performed on faecal samples from the patients (pre-, post-FMT, and follow-up) and the associated donor samples. Sparse partial-least-square analysis was used to identify correlations between the two datasets.

Results

The patients’ microbiota post-FMT tended to shift towards the donor microbiota, specifically through proportional increases of Bacteroides, Blautia, and Ruminococcus, and proportional decreases of Enterococcus, Escherichia, and Klebsiella. However, although cured of infection, one patient, who suffers from chronic alcohol abuse, retained the compositional characteristics of the pre-FMT microbiota. Following FMT, increased levels of short-chain fatty acids, particularly butyrate and acetate, were observed in all patients. Sparse partial-least-square analysis confirmed a positive correlation between butyrate and Bacteroides, Blautia, and Ruminococcus, with a negative correlation between butyrate and Klebsiella and Enterococcus.

Conclusions

Clear differences were observed in the microbiota composition and metabolic profiles between donors and rCDI patients, which were largely resolved in patients following FMT. Increased levels of butyrate appear to be a factor associated with resolution of rCDI.

Introduction

Although Clostridium difficile is present in the intestines of ∼3–5% of healthy adults,1 the occurrence of C. difficile infection (CDI) in healthy individuals is relatively uncommon due to the protective effect of the gut microbiota. The incidents and severity of CDI has risen significantly over the last decade, and it is now recognised as the main causative agent of healthcare-associated infectious diarrhoea in hospitals worldwide.2 The standard treatment for CDI is the administration of metronidazole for mild to moderate infections, and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for severe infections and relapses. The ability of C. difficile to form spores, coupled with the increase in antibiotic-resistant strains, can lead to persistence of infection, relapses, and the administration of more antibiotics, which further depletes the commensal bacteria. This creates an environment that is more favourable to C. difficile, thus setting up a cycle of relapse and re-infection. It is estimated that 20-30% of patients who develop a first episode of CDI go on to have at least one relapse, and of these, a further 60% develop further episodes of relapses.3 This increases the need for further antibiotics, the risk of antibiotic-resistance in the gut commensal flora, and costs to the health service, with each episode of CDI estimated to cost approximately £7000 in 2010.4

Faecal microbiota transplants (FMT) represents an effective alternative to antibiotics to treat recurrent CDI (rCDI), with a primary cure rate as high as 91%.5 The central tenet behind FMT is that the introduction of a healthy bacterial community into the intestines produces an environment that is less favourable to C. difficile by increasing colonisation resistance and reinstating a protective effect. The advantages of this treatment are that it is quick, cost-effective, and could help to eradicate antibiotic resistant strains of C. difficile.

It is known that a dysbiotic gut microbiota increases the risk of developing CDI, however whether there is a common element within this community composition that could help to determine if a patient is at greater risk of rCDI is as yet unknown. The reduction in diversity within the dysbiotic gut microbiota would also suggest a reduction in metabolic potential through the loss of gene diversity. The functional redundancy6 within the gut microbiota suggests, that metabolic function is more relevant than which species are present or absent. Whilst a number of studies have looked at the changes in microbiota composition due to FMT,7, 8, 9, 10 we know little about the changes to the metabolic capacities of the altered microbiota. The aim of this study was to assess FMT-induced changes in both the microbial community structure and metabolite profiles of the gut microbiomes of seven patients with rCDI, as well as those of their associated FMT donors.

Patients and methods

Patients

Patients were selected as candidates for the FMT procedure if they had at least two confirmed recurrences of CDI. C. difficile testing was based on a two stage algorithm in line with Public Health England recommendations.11 This involves screening faecal samples by glutamate dehydrogenase enzyme immunoassay (Techlab, USA), followed by C. difficile toxin testing by enzyme immunoassay (Techlab, USA). Glutamate dehydrogenase positive, toxin negative samples were further tested for the presence of toxigenic genes by PCR. FMT exclusion criteria included immunocompromised patients, those aged less than 16, and those with severe comorbidities which would make the patient unfit for endoscopy. FMT was introduced into clinical care at Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital following approval by the New Therapies committee, and was performed in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975. Patients were consented for the study by a clinician following a detailed discussion of the procedure with the patient or their next of kin. All patient data is fully anonymised.

Donor screening

The faecal donors used for the cohort of patients who underwent FMT in this study were both healthy Caucasian males with a BMI between 24 and 27 kg/m2, aged 36 (D05) and 30 (D03) years of age, respectively. Potential donors were asked to complete a questionnaire adapted from van Nood et al.12 regarding their medical history and lifestyle habits to identify risk factors for potentially transmittable diseases. Eligible candidates provided blood and stool samples for laboratory screening tests. Blood samples were screened for hepatitis A, B, C, and E antibodies, HIV 1 & 2, human T-lymphotropic virus 1 & 2, Epstein-Barr virus, Cytomegalovirus, syphilis, Entamoeba histolytica, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Treponema pallidum. Stool samples were tested for the presence of C. difficile or its toxins, Helicobacter pylori antigen, Norovirus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing organisms, carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia coli O157, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., and Campylobacter species. In addition, microscopy was used to investigate for ova, cysts, and parasites. Prior to the donation of stool samples for each FMT procedure, donors were asked to refrain from eating peanuts and shellfish, and to complete a short screening questionnaire to confirm no changes to health or lifestyle since the last donor screening that may put the patient at risk.

Faecal suspension preparation

Donor faeces were collected in a sterile container on the day of the procedure, and transferred to a sterilised class II safety cabinet (Walker Ltd, UK). A maximum of 80 g of donor stool was homogenised with sterile saline (0.9%), to a ratio of 5 ml saline per gram of stool, in a strainer bag (BA6141/STR; Seward Limited, UK) using a Stomacher® 400 Circulator (Seward Limited, UK) set to 230 RPM for a duration of 1 min. The filtered faecal preparation was drawn up into labelled sterile 60 ml syringes using nasojejunal tubing connected to the Luer lock. The syringes were secured with sterile Luer lock caps and transported immediately to the hospital. Aliquots of the donor faecal sample were immediately stored at −20 °C until analysis.

Faecal suspension infusion

Patients were prescribed oral vancomycin 500 mg four times daily for 4 days, with the last dose received the night before the procedure. Also, on the day before the FMT procedure, a bowel lavage is performed using 4 l of macrogol solution (Klean-Prep, Norgine). Patients were taken to the endoscopy unit for insertion of nasojejunal tube the night before the procedure. Our FMT protocol was adapted from that of van Nood et al.12 On the day of FMT infusion, the patient’s headrest was elevated to 45°, patency of the nasojejunal tube was checked by flushing with water, and 420 ml of faecal suspension was delivered slowly by the patient’s bedside in the isolation room via a nasojejunal tube using the prefilled syringes. This was performed at a rate of ∼20 ml per minute with a break of 5-10 minutes applied halfway through the procedure. Post-infusion instructions were to monitor observations, and record bowel motions. Patients could take on fluids one hour after the procedure, and were observed overnight before discharge the next day at the earliest. Although there are no agreed durations of follow-up post-FMT,13 van Nood et al.12 used two endpoints to measure cure, namely no relapse after 5 weeks, and no relapse after 10 weeks. Resolution was defined as type 4 or less on the Bristol stool chart or stool normal for the patient e.g. in case of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding. We followed patients up by telephone or in person if they were re-admitted into the hospital for an unrelated illness. Post-FMT samples were collected after a minimum of 10 days post-FMT, and postal kits were provided to patients who were willing to donate a ‘follow-up’ sample up to 2 weeks later.

Sample analysis

Faecal microbiota analysis

Faecal samples were collected from recipients within 9 days prior to FMT, however the pre-FMT sample for patient R13 was not collected within this timeframe, and a previously frozen sample obtained whilst the patient was suffering from the same episode of CDI was used. Further samples were collected for all recipients following the procedure (‘post-FMT’ range: 11–141 days; ‘follow-up’ range: 4–14 days after post-FMT sample), and stored at −20 °C until analysis. The DNA was extracted using the FastDNA SPIN Kit for Soil (MP Biomedicals, UK) with a bead-beating step.14 DNA yield was quantified using the Qubit fluorometer prior to the samples being sent to the Earlham Institute (UK), where the V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA genes were amplified using the 515F and 806R primers with built-in degeneracy.15 The amplicons were sequenced using paired-end Illumina sequencing (2 × 250 bp) on the MiSeq platform (Illumina, USA). Sequencing data, for the 21 samples that had an appropriate level of sequencing depth, were analysed using the Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology (QIIME) 1.9 software and RDP classifier 16S rRNA gene sequence database.16,17 The trimmed reads were filtered for chimeric sequences using ChimeraSlayer, bacterial taxonomy assignment with a confidence value threshold of 50% was performed with the RDP classifier (version 2.10), and trimmed reads clustered into operational taxonomic units at 97% identity level. Alpha diversity and rarefaction plots were computed using the Chao1 index. Weighted and unweighted UniFrac distances were used to generate beta diversity principal coordinates analysis plots, which were visualised using the Emperor tool.

Faecal metabolite analysis

A known mass (∼ 100 mg) of thawed faecal samples were added to sterile tubes. The faecal waters were generated by adding the phosphate buffer (prepared in D2O) to 8.3% w/v. Homogenised faecal waters were centrifuged at 16,200 x g at room temperature for 5 min. The supernatants were filter sterilised (0.2 µm) and placed in a 5 mm NMR tube. The 1H NMR spectra were recorded at 600 MHz on a Bruker Avance spectrometer (Bruker BioSpin GmbH, Germany) running Topspin 2.0 software and fitted with a cryoprobe and a 60-slot autosampler. Each 1H NMR spectrum was acquired with 1280 scans, a spectral width of 12,300 Hz, and an acquisition time of 2.67 s. The “noesypr1d” pre-saturation sequence was used to suppress the residual water signal with a low-power selective irradiation at the water frequency during the recycle delay and a mixing time of 10 ms. Spectra were transformed with a 0.3 Hz line broadening, and were manually phased, baseline corrected, and referenced by setting the TSP methyl signal to 0 ppm. The metabolites were quantified using the software Chenomx® NMR Suite 7.0TM.

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https://www.journalofinfection.com/article/S0163-4453(18)30117-8/fulltext?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email#.W1D-PZVsdBY.twitter

Clorox Healthcare® VersaSure™ Cleaner Disinfectant Wipes Introduced

Patented alcohol-free quat technology with the versatility to use throughout healthcare settings with broad-spectrum disinfection

 

 

Clorox Healthcare is proud to announce the latest addition to its industry-leading portfolio of healthcare disinfectants: new Clorox Healthcare® VersaSureCleaner Disinfectant Wipes, an innovative, alcohol-free quat solution versatile enough to use on common healthcare surfaces with the assurance of broad-spectrum disinfection.

Clorox Healthcare® VersaSureCleaner Disinfectant Wipes are Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered to kill 44 pathogens, including bacteria, viruses and fungi, in two minutes or less. The unique, low odor, low residue formula features patented technology that enhances quat activity on surfaces to deliver broader efficacy and faster kill times without co-actives. The result is a versatile, one-step cleaner disinfectant wipe with the speed and efficacy healthcare facilities rely on and superior aesthetics, wetness and cleaning power needed for convenient, compliant use facility-wide.

Clorox Healthcare® VersaSureCleaner Disinfectant Wipes’ innovative new formula provides:

  • Speed and Strength Against Key Pathogens: VersaSure is EPA-registered to kill 44 microorganisms, including 14 multi-drug resistant pathogens, in two minutes or less. VersaSure kills influenza viruses, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), measles, mumps and other viruses in 30 seconds1 and kills bacteria and fungi, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE), Escherichia coli (E. coli), salmonella, mycobacterium bovis (TB) and Candida albicans, in two minutes.
  • Excellent Aesthetics and Cleaning Power: Patented alcohol-free quat technology and innovative wipe design combine to provide excellent aesthetics, wetness and cleaning power. The low residue formula is designed for superior staff and patient comfort with no harsh chemical fumes or odors. Durable, low-linting wipes are textured for greater strength. Excellent wetness provides greater surface coverage compared with competitor quat and quat-alcohol disinfectant wipes and assurance that treated surfaces will remain wet for the full contact time.
  • Convenient, Compatible Use: VersaSure wipes are ready-to-use, fast acting and compatible with a broad range of hard, non-porous surfaces found in healthcare settings. A variety of sizes, including multipurpose wipes in 85 and 150 count canisters and 30 count flat packs, and terminal wipes for everyday cleaning and disinfecting of large spaces, available in 110 count buckets and refill pouches, makes VersaSure convenient for both nurses and environmental services teams to use facility-wide.

“Not all disinfectants are created equal and many don’t have the optimal balance of attributes to meet users’ needs. For example, a conventional quat or alcohol-based product might offer good compatibility, but have limited kill claims or evaporate from surfaces before meeting the required contact time,” says Brian Thompson, department manager – R&D, Clorox Healthcare. “We believe healthcare facilities shouldn’t have to make those trade-offs and with VersaSure, they don’t. Our R&D teams refused to make compromises between efficacy, aesthetics, wetness and cleaning power, and today we are excited to offer a one-step, ‘use everywhere’ wipe with broad-spectrum efficacy healthcare facilities can trust.”

Building the Industry’s Most Innovative, Comprehensive Portfolio of Disinfecting Solutions

In the fight against infections, today’s healthcare facilities need proven solutions to kill a broad range of pathogens, from seasonal threats like influenza and deadly pathogens like Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), to community-associated MRSA and new threats posed by emerging viral pathogens. Clorox Healthcare offers the industry’s most robust portfolio of EPA-registered surface disinfectants in addition to advanced UV technology, as well as cleaning and odor removal products to provide healthcare facilities, nurses and EVS professionals with a comprehensive portfolio of best-in-class solutions to help reduce the risk of infections and keep patients, staff, visitors and the broader community safe.

Clorox Healthcare understands that safeguarding healthcare environments requires advanced and evolving solutions. VersaSure joins products like Clorox Healthcare® Fuzion Cleaner Disinfectant, a new type of bleach that combines disinfecting efficacy against tough-to-kill pathogens like C. difficile spores with broad surface compatibility,

Clorox Healthcare® Bleach Germicidal Wipes and Clorox Healthcare® Hydrogen Peroxide Cleaner Disinfectants in a class of ready-to-use disinfectants that are tough on pathogens and optimized for surface compatibility, aesthetics, ease-of-use and patient and staff comfort to enable broad use, promote compliance and enhance safety facility-wide.

“At Clorox Healthcare, we are constantly innovating and working to expand the depth and breadth of our industry-leading portfolio, both by pushing the envelope with new product development and constantly striving for improvement to ensure that the mainstay surface disinfectants healthcare facilities depend on continue to meet the highest standards of efficacy and evolving needs of real-world healthcare environments,” says Lynda Lurie, director – marketing, Clorox Healthcare. “The expansion of our portfolio with the launch of VersaSure, brings us one step closer to our goal of removing the environment from the infection prevention equation.”

About Clorox Healthcare
Building on a century-long legacy in cleaning and disinfecting, Clorox Healthcare offers a wide range of products to help stop the spread of infection in healthcare facilities. From comprehensive surface disinfection to advanced ultraviolet technology, we are committed to providing efficacious solutions to the healthcare community. For more information, visit www.CloroxHealthcare.com or follow @CloroxHealth on Twitter.

1Kills rotavirus in two minutes.

 

Clorox Healthcare logo (PRNewsFoto/Clorox Professional Products Co.)

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SOURCE Clorox Healthcare

Read more at https://www.thecloroxcompany.com/release/#tHkDJjKXBYteXfXg.99

Maintaining Nutrition During a C.diff. Infection – Apricot Chicken Tenders Recipe

Low Carb, Good Source of Protein = Healthy Entree.

Add a serving of mashed potatoes or a baked potato with a low-fiber vegetable to complete this lunch or dinner entree.

Ingredients Needed:

(Serves 5)

½ cup fruit-only apricot preserves
1 Tablespoon apple cider vinegar
¼ teaspoon sweet paprika
1 lb  chicken tenders

Instructions:

1. In a medium skillet combine the apricot preserves,  vinegar, and sweet paprika. Place over low heat and mix often for 4 minutes. Rinse the chicken tenders and place in a large bowl. Pour the apricot mixture over the chicken, and place in the fridge for 20 minutes.

2. Turn on the oven and set to broil. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil. Place a wire rack in the center of the sheet and arrange the marinated chicken in a single layer. Place in the oven on the top rack. After 5 minutes, use tongs to turn the chicken. Return to the oven for another 5 minutes. Allow the chicken to blacken slightly. (Chicken should be well cooked).

Nutrition Data:
One serving equals: 215 calories, 1g fat, 91mg sodium, 14g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, and 27g protein

 

It Takes a Team Approach To Break the Chain of Infections and Decrease Infection Rates

Reduce the Risk to Patients, Staff and Visitors

A comprehensive approach to C. diff can break the chain of infection and help to decrease the spread of this organism throughout your hospital. There are many paths of transmission that contribute to the spread of C. diff from infected patients to the hands of healthcare workers, visitors and the environment. Progressive distribution of spores happens through multiple contacts to multiple surfaces and people. Ensure your staff is trained to identify patients exhibiting C. diff symptoms.

To guard against C. diff, follow three key environmental and hand hygiene workflows to help ensure your facility breaks the chain of infection and improves patient outcomes.

  1. Identify and Communicate Risk. Communications remains key to controlling the spread of C. diff during complex interactions and location changes in hospitals. Proper communication protocols better support the tracking and reporting of infections and prevention efforts.
  2. Assess Appropriate and Timely Environmental Hygiene. Implement a strong process to regularly audit the adequacy of room cleaning, so you know before you have an issue. Audits and processes will also help you proactively identify where your staff can improve. Stay ahead of potential outbreaks through proactive daily use of a sporicidal disinfectant with good material compatibility for daily cleaning and disinfection of surfaces.
  3. Implement Hand Hygiene Practices. Hands are the main pathways for germ transmission during healthcare. Practicing good hand hygiene is key to mitigating the spread of C. diff. The ability to accurately monitor hand hygiene in your hospital can drive positive change, decrease the risk of HAIs and improve patient outcomes. With the more stringent interpretation of the hand hygiene policy issued by the Joint Commission in January 2018, immediate citations will be issued for any single instance of a healthcare worker’s non-compliance during a patient interaction.

Transform the way your hospital assesses, communicates, tracks and reports C. diff and other HAIs to drive and sustain better patient outcomes and increase compliance. To learn how to implement these workflows into your hospital program and to gain insightful technology tips, visit www.ecolab.com/healthcareinsightscenter.

 

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20180703/SPONSORED/180709972