Author Archives: cdifffoundation

Thanksgiving Greeting

Our Thanksgiving Message 🦃

Thanksgiving is that time of year with expressions of gratitude and thankfulness for those in our lives.  For some people, it’s extremely difficult and maybe even a bit complicated and we understand. For others, it’s a time for harvesting the strength to push forward and allow more time for healing and we understand. It’s a day in the journey where we pause to share the attitude of gratitude for the little things in life. 💚 On behalf of all the members, patient advocates, and the C Diff Foundation family worldwide, we send you and your family our warmest wishes, Happy Thanksgiving. 💚

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Publish the 2018 National & State Healthcare Associated Infection Progress Report

The CDC published the 2018 National and State Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI) Progress Report showing significant progress nationally  in reducing several hospital-acquired infections and highlighting that prevention of these infections is possible. CDC’s HAI Progress Report is a snapshot of how each state and the country are doing in eliminating the infections outlined in the HAI National Action Plan.

 

Using data from CDC’s National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), the 2018 HAI Progress Report shows the following reductions have been achieved nationally among acute care hospitals (2017 – 2018):

  • About 9% decrease in central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs)
  • About 8% decrease in catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs)
  • No significant changes in ventilator-associated events (VAEs)
  • No significant changes in surgical site infections (SSIs) related to the 10 procedures tracked in the report
  • No significant changes in hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream infections
  • About 12% decrease in hospital-onset C. difficile infections

 Each day, approximately one in 31 U.S. patients have at least one infection in association with his or her hospital care, underscoring the need for improvements in patient care practices in U.S. healthcare facilities. While much progress has been made, more needs to be done to prevent healthcare-associated infections in a variety of settings. Ongoing collaboration between public health, healthcare professionals, and other partners is critical to ensuring patient safety.

 Additionally, the HAI Progress Report data are now available in CDC’s new Antibiotic Resistance & Patient Safety Portal (AR&PSP), an interactive web-based application that was created to innovatively display data collected through CDC’s NHSN and other sources.  We hope you’ll use the AR&PSP to view enhanced data visualizations on Antibiotic Resistance, Use, and Stewardship datasets as well as HAI data for the nation and states.

November Is C. diff. Awareness Month: We Can Make a Difference Together Worldwide

In joint efforts with the C Diff Foundation Advocates and organizations dedicated in preventing and treating life-threatening Clostridioides difficile (C. diff., C. difficile) infections,  we express our gratitude and congratulate the State of Arizona, Arkansas, Idaho, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico,  Pennsylvania, West Virginia,  Wisconsin, to name a few, to date  for declaring November “Clostridioides difficile (C. diff., C. difficile) Awareness Month.

The Proclamations approved serve to heighten awareness of the impact this disease has on patients across the United States. The infection, which has been labeled an urgent national health threat by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), results in 500,000 infections each year and is directly responsible for approximately 29,000 patients who died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of C. difficile.  Of those, about 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly attributable to C. difficile infections.

 

 

 

 

 

An excerpt from USA Today article published in 2012:    Deaths and illnesses are much higher than reports have shown. In March, the  CDC  said in a report that the C difficile infection kills 14,000 people a year. But that estimate is based on death certificates, which often don’t list the infection when patients die from complications, such as kidney failure.  Hospital billing data collected by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality shows that more than 9% of C. diff-related hospitalizations end in death — nearly five times the rate for other hospital stays. That adds up to more than 30,000 fatalities among the 347,000 C. diff hospitalizations in 2010. Thousands of patients are treated in nursing homes, clinics and doctors’ offices.

“We’re talking in the range of close to 500,000 total cases a year,” says Cliff McDonald, a C. diff expert, and senior science adviser in the CDC’s Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion. And annual fatalities “may well be … as high as 30,000.”

* AHRQ News and Numbers provides statistical highlights on the use and cost of health services and health insurance in the United States.

http://archive.ahrq.gov/news/newsroom/news-and-numbers/012512.html

In the USA:  Nearly half a million Americans suffer from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released February 25, 2015, by the Centers for

Not only in November, but every day of the year it is our time to make a difference!  Most patients and their families, until their diagnosis, are not familiar with this infectious disease.  When they tell their friends and family, their friends and family have never heard of a C. difficile (Clostridium difficile, C. diff., CDI)  infection before.

Sometimes, even when they are told by their doctors of this diagnosis, the doctors can be largely unfamiliar with the impact of this infection and the treatments readily available. This is astonishing. Why? Because a C. diff. infection impacts individuals differently than it did decades ago.  The re-occurrence rate is greater today than it was in previous years.   C.difficile infections are not only acquired by a hospital stay but can be community-acquired.  It is a global diagnosis and this infection is not isolated in the senior population, however; seniors remain in the higher risk category of acquiring this infection.

FACT:  About a C. diff. infection  — Over 41 individuals lose their life to a Clostridioides difficile infection in the United States of America alone each day — C. difficile has no boundaries — It can be acquired by anyone –  at any location and at any age.

Every year we work together to change the level of C. difficile awareness worldwide. Every year we make a difference. Every day of every year we share information through education and advocacy for patients and continue to raise awareness of Clostridioides difficile infection (C. diff., C. difficile, CDI) prevention, treatments, clinical trials, and environmental safety  — further than the day before.

“None of us can do this alone – All of us can do this together.”

Clostridioides difficile (C. diff. C. difficile, CDI) has had an immeasurable impact on our families, in our communities, in our countries.  It is a leading Healthcare-associated infection (HAI) yet awareness of Clostridioides difficile remains quite low among the general public worldwide.

Help us change this.  Contact us and join us TODAY!

Take Action

  • Draft a letter to your State Governor requesting a Proclamation for November dedicated for promoting Clostridium difficile Infection Awareness.
  • Create Your Own Fundraiser!
  • Contact kathy@cdifffoundation.org to get started on the fundraiser of your choice.

Awareness Tools

  • Share the C Diff Foundation brochure  (request your copies by e-mail)  A great guide to explain details about a C. diff. infection and data on C. diff. prevention, treatments, and environmental safety available.
  • The Clinical Trials Page showcases Clostridium difficile prevention and treatment clinical trials available and research-driven results.
  • Personal Stories on C. diff. Survivors Alliance  allow you to share your story, to help raise awareness about C. difficile infections, and to help raise funds for C Diff Foundation www.cdifffoundation.org
  • Share  C.diff. Global Community Support session information which is FREE and available across the USA and accessible from 57 countries to learn more about a C. diff. infection, Nutrition, and to speak with health care providers and fellow-C.diff. survivors to gain knowledge and have questions answered.

Social Media Involvement

Please join us and share YOUR story. Use these November Awareness campaign hashtags to spread awareness for November Is Clostridioides difficile (Clostridium difficile, C.diff., C.difficile, CDI) Infection Awareness Month.

To obtain printed literature to share with your family, friends, colleagues, in your community and with your health care providers  — along with  a “November Is C. diff. Awareness Month”  Magnet, please contact the C Diff Foundation’s Main Office (727) 205-3922 or email your request:  info@cdifffoundation.org

#CdiffInfectionAwareness

(Facebook)  (Twitter)

#CdiffNovemberAwareness

(Facebook)  (Twitter)

# # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # #

NOVEMBER IS ALSO U.S. Antibiotics Awareness Week

November 18 – 24, 2019

 

 

 

CDC’s educational effort, Be Antibiotics Aware: Smart Use, Best Care, is the year-round effort to improve antibiotic prescribing and use and combat antibiotic resistance.

In November the  annual campaign  developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) :

Share the resources of countries Raising Antibiotic Awareness Worldwide

https://www.cdc.gov/antibiotic-use/week/get-involved.html

Antibiotic Awareness Week

https://www.england.nhs.uk/2019/10/world-antibiotic-awareness-week-18-22-november/

 

How do Antibiotics cause C. diff.?  The antibiotics cause a disruption in the normal intestinal flora which leads to an overgrowth of C. difficile bacteria in the colon. Leading antibiotics are known to disrupt the normal intestinal flora.

As far back as November 2012, the CDC started sharing a public announcement regarding antibiotic use: Colds and many ear and sinus infections are caused by viruses, not bacteria. Taking antibiotics to treat a “virus” can make those drugs less effective when you and your family really need them. Limiting the usage of antibiotics will also help limit new cases of CDI.
*Always discuss the symptoms and medications with the treating Physician/Healthcare Provider.

 

Your participation makes a BIG difference around the globe.

Study Shows Older Adults Diagnosed With Cancer Have a Higher Risk Of Acquiring a C. diff. Infection

Older adults with cancer have a higher risk of developing Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) than those without a cancer diagnosis, according to a new study.

The risk is particularly high for those with hematologic malignancies and those with recently diagnosed solid tumors

and distant metastasis (Emerg Infect Dis 2019;25[9]:1683-1689).

“CDI is the leading cause of healthcare-associated infection,” said Mini Kamboj, MD, the chief medical epidemiologist of infection control at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. “Older adults over the age of 65 are at a higher risk for developing CDI and related complications. Our study demonstrates that this risk in advanced age is further amplified by a cancer diagnosis.”

Dr. Kamboj and her colleagues conducted a retrospective cohort study using population-based Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results/Medicare–linked data to assess CDI occurrence during 2011. Medicare beneficiaries with and without cancer were included. For those with cancer, patients with solid (breast, colon, lung, prostate, and head and neck) and hematologic (lymphoma, myeloma, and leukemia) tumors diagnosed from 2006 to 2010 were included. All included participants were at least 66 years of age at the time of diagnosis. They also included patients at least 66 years of age at the start of 2011 with no history of cancer.

Of the 93,566 beneficiaries in the study, 2.6% were diagnosed with CDI during the study period. Of these, 2.8% of the patients with cancer had CDI, compared with 2.4% of the noncancer patients. The incidence of CDI also increased with age: from 1.9% among patients 66 to 69 years of age to 2.9% among patients at least 85 years of age.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link:

https://www.clinicaloncology.com/Current-Practice/Article/08-19/Older-Adults-With-Cancer-at-High-Risk-for-C.-diff-Infection/55862?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

Researchers Find C. diff. a Major Cause of Nosocomial Diarrheal Disease Exhibits Phenotypic Heterogeneity Within a Clonal Population As a Result of Phase Variation

Recent work has revealed that Clostridioides difficile, a major cause of nosocomial diarrheal disease, exhibits phenotypic heterogeneity within a clonal population as a result of phase variation.

Many C. difficile strains representing multiple ribotypes develop two colony morphotypes, termed rough and smooth, but the biological implications of this phenomenon have not been explored. Here, we examine the molecular basis and physiological relevance of the distinct colony morphotypes produced by this bacterium. We show that C. difficile reversibly differentiates into rough and smooth colony morphologies and that bacteria derived from the isolates display discrete motility behaviors. We identified an atypical phase-variable signal transduction system consisting of a histidine kinase and two response regulators, named herein colony morphology regulators RST (CmrRST), which mediates the switch in colony morphology and motility behaviors. The CmrRST-regulated surface motility is independent of flagella and type IV pili, suggesting a novel mechanism of cell migration in C. difficile. Microscopic analysis of cell and colony structure indicates that CmrRST promotes the formation of elongated bacteria arranged in bundled chains, which may contribute to bacterial migration on surfaces. In a hamster model of acute C. difficile disease, the CmrRST system is required for disease development. Furthermore, we provide evidence that CmrRST phase varies during infection, suggesting that the intestinal environment impacts the proportion of CmrRST-expressing C. difficile. Our findings indicate that C. difficile employs phase variation of the CmrRST signal transduction system to generate phenotypic heterogeneity during infection, with concomitant effects on bacterial physiology and pathogenesis.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link:

https://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.3000379

C Diff Foundation’s Junior Infection Fighters Program Takes Action against Harmful Germs One Community at a Time Worldwide

C Diff Foundation Junior Infection Fighter Program was introduced to families and their children/teens in Chester County, Pennsylvania on October 12, 2019.

Dayle Skelly, Director of the Junior Infection Fighter Program and C. diff. A survivor said, “There shouldn’t be an age limit for raising awareness of infection prevention. Children are our future and take forth the torch of knowledge to be shared with everyone in each community.”

The volunteer program has been developed for children/teens, ages 7 to 14, with the participation and support of their parents/legal guardian and supervision of C Diff Foundation adult volunteers.

C Diff Foundation’s Junior Infection Fighters Program mission:

“To educate and advocate for infection prevention with the children and teens and to inspire their social, academic, personal, and health care knowledge.  To partner with parents, sharing the same mission, to prepare the Junior Infection Fighter Volunteers to be members of ever-changing global health care in societies worldwide.”

C Diff Foundation’s Junior Infection Fighter guidelines have been brought to fruition, under the direction of a leading infection preventionist, Maureen Spencer, RN, M.Ed., CIC.

Ms. Spencer who has been an Infection Preventionist for over 30 years and board certified in infection control (CIC). As one of the early pioneers in infection control, she was awarded the APIC National Carole DeMille Award in 1990 and was selected as one of the APIC Heroes of Infection Prevention in 2007 for her work in establishing a MRSA and Staph aureus Elimination Program at New England Baptist Hospital, an Orthopedic Center of Excellence in Boston. The groundbreaking work was published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery

All volunteer attendees enjoyed spending time learning more about practicing healthy habits combined with infection prevention information during the inaugural community event.

“We work together to carve new paths in the multi-faceted patient and family programs offered by
C Diff Foundation. Together we build awareness and advocate for a leading healthcare-acquired
infection; C. difficile.  Globally educating and advocating for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, clinical trials, antibiotic-resistance, and environmental safety. We are truly grateful to the dedicated members taking the C Diff Foundation’s mission to greater levels changing lives, and saving lives across the globe,” said Nancy C. Caralla, Founding President, C Diff Foundation.

Interested in joining the Junior Infection Fighters Program?

Contact the C Diff Foundation Main Office:  (727) 205-3922  or email

info@cdifffoundation.org

We look forward to hearing from you!

Summit Therapeutics Shares New Data – Phase 2 Clinical Trial of ridinilazole for C. difficile infection (CDI)

Summit Therapeutics Reports New Data from Phase 2 Clinical Trial Connecting Ridinilazole’s Microbiome Preservation to Improved Clinical Outcomes for Patients with C. difficile Infection

October 2019

Summit Therapeutics announced the presentation of new data that explain the link between two key findings in the Company’s Phase 2 clinical trial of ridinilazole for C. difficile infection (‘CDI’):

  • Ridinilazole demonstrated superior efficacy compared to vancomycin, driven by a 60% lower recurrence rate.
  • Ridinilazole preserved the diversity of the gut microbiome.

Researchers at Tufts University, collaborating with Summit, showed that these findings are connected mechanistically by bile acids, part of the ‘metabolome’ of active chemicals made or modified by gut bacteria. Bile acids exist in different forms that can either favour or block the regrowth of C. difficile after treatment. Vancomycin kills bacteria that turn pro-C. difficile bile acids into anti-C. difficile bile acids – leaving an adverse ratio of pro- and anti-growth chemicals that favours the regrowth of C. difficile and the recurrence of C. difficile infection. By contrast, ridinilazole leaves these bacteria unharmed, allowing them to keep converting pro-C. difficile bile acids into anti-C. difficile bile acids, maintaining a positive chemical balance that prevents C. difficile recurrence.

“The damaging effect of broad-spectrum antibiotics in the treatment of CDI is far-reaching from the make-up and function of the gut microbiome through the poor clinical outcomes seen in one third of patients, driven by a high rate of disease recurrence,” said Dr David Roblin, President of R&D of Summit. “Ridinilazole has the potential to be a targeted CDI treatment that could result in significantly better patient outcomes for the over half million US patients per year who have an episode of CDI. These latest data help to put the science behind the function of a healthy microbiome into context and highlight its importance in sustaining CDI cures.”

The Phase 2 clinical trial enrolled 100 patients, half of whom received ridinilazole and the other half vancomycin. For both groups, there was a higher ratio of pro-C. difficile to anti C.-difficile bile acids at the start of treatment. This was expected, as patients who get CDI have perturbed microbiomes. However, during treatment, the proportion of anti-C. difficile bile acids increased in patients treated with ridinilazole, whereas patients treated with vancomycin initially showed decreases in anti-C. difficile bile acids and had stools dominated by pro-C. difficile bile acids. By the end of treatment, ridinilazole-treated patients’ bile acid ratios returned towards a healthy, non-CDI state. These results support the data from the Phase 2 clinical trial, in which patients receiving ridinilazole showed a statistically significant improvement in sustained clinical responses.

Copies of the two poster presentations are available in the Publications section of Summit’s website, www.summitplc.com.

To read press release and additional press releases  click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.summitplc.com