Author Archives: cdifffoundation

First Isolation of C.diff. PCR Ribotype 027 and Epidemiological Research of CDI in Hospitalized Adults In Tongji Hospital, Central China

Abstract

Author Information: Zhou Y1, Mao L2, Yu J2, Lin Q2, Luo Y2, Zhu X3, Sun Z4.

BACKGROUND:

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is an emerging healthcare problem in the world. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic epidemiological research of CDI in Tongji hospital, the central of China.

METHODS:

Stool samples from hospitalized adults suspected of CDI were enrolled. The diagnosis of CDI were based on the combination of clinical symptoms and laboratory results. Clinical features of CDI and non-CDI patients were compared by appropriate statistical tests to determine the risk factors of CDI. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was employed for molecular epidemiological analysis. Susceptibility testing and relevant antimicrobial agent resistance genes were performed as well.

RESULTS:

From June 2016 to September 2017, 839 hospitalized adults were enrolled. Among them, 107 (12.8%, 107/839) patients were C. difficile culture positive, and 73 (8.7%, 73/839) were infected with toxigenic C. difficile (TCD), with tcdA + tcdB+ strains accounting for 90.4% (66/73) and tcdA-tcdB+ for 9.6% (7/73). Meanwhile, two TCD strains were binary toxin positive and one of them was finally identified as CD027. Severe symptoms were observed in these two cases. Multivariate analysis indicated antibiotic exposure (p = 0.001, OR = 5.035) and kidney disease (p = 0.015, OR = 8.329) significantly increased the risk of CDI. Phylogenetic tree analysis demonstrated 21 different STs, including one new ST (ST467); and the most dominant type was ST54 (35.6%, 26/73). Multidrug-resistant (MDR) TCD were 53.4% (39/73); resistance to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and clindamycin were > 50%. Other antibiotics showed relative efficiency and all strains were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. All moxifloxacin-resistant isolates carried a mutation in GyrA (Thr82 → Ile), with one both having mutation in GyrB (Ser366 → Ala).

CONCLUSIONS:

Knowledge of epidemiological information for CDI is limited in China. Our finding indicated tcdA + tcdB+ C. difficile strains were the dominant for CDI in our hospital. Significant risk factors for CDI in our setting appeared to be antibiotic exposure and kidney disease. Metronidazole and vancomycin were still effective for CDI. Although no outbreak was observed, the first isolation of CD027 in center China implied the potential spread of this hypervirulent clone. Further studies are needed to enhance our understanding of the epidemiology of CDI in China.

Source:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30845918?dopt=Abstract&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

Path03Gen Is Taking a Step In the Right Direction to Reduce Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI’s)

Amazing research and developments are taking place all across the globe.

In St. Petersburg, Florida there is an organization dedicated in fighting  harmful pathogens and the St. Pete Catalyst’s Journalist Margie Manning had the following to report on the “Green Earth Medical Solutions” technology company:

Green Earth Medical Solutions developed technology that kills germs on the bottom of shoes, which often are overlooked as a source for bacteria, virus and other disease-causing microorganisms.

The company’s PathO3Gen sanitizing stations combine UVC, a type of ultraviolet light, and ozone, to sanitize shoes. Anyone entering a healthcare facility or a critical care area steps on the station and waits for about six seconds. When they step off, 99.9 percent of the deadly pathogens have been eliminated, said chief operating officer Scott Beal.

Healthcare acquired infections, or HAIs, cause about 100,000 deaths every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There’s been a lot of attention paid to infection control in healthcare, most of it focused on hand washing and cleaning high-touch surfaces. A 2017 clinical study showed 77 percent of the soles of shoes walking into a hospital contained superbugs such as MRSA and C. difficile, or a combination of the two.

“Initially, clinicians said ‘we don’t operate on the floors, those are not areas of concern,’” Beal said. “But the infection control community and stakeholders have been coming out with more and more published credible studies that say what is tracked in on the floor is getting airborne and aerosolized, and makes it to high-touch areas, which then cause HAIs.”

Reducing pathogens tracked in by shoes also increases the efficacy of other sanitizing methods, because the building is not being overrun by germs, Beal said.

Hospitals have financial reasons to reduce hospital-acquired infections. Beginning in 2015, federal reimbursements to hospitals were directly affected by their HAI rates.

AdventHealth Connerton, an acute-care specialty hospital in Pasco County, is testing the technology.

“The sanitizing stations allow us to establish new protocols that proactively prevent infections to ensure the best possible outcomes for patients while they’re in our care,” Debi Martoccio, chief operating officer at AdventHealth Connerton, said in a statement.

With any new technology, gaining traction and changing minds are tough to do, Beal said.

“It’s important to have someone the size and scope and reputation of AdventHealth that sees the benefit of what we are trying to accomplish,” he said.

There also are foot sanitizing stations at Cypress Creek Assisted Living in Sun City Center.

There are competitors that use UVC to disinfect shoes, Beal said. None of those companies combine UVC with ozone, a combination initially created by Asher Gil, an Israeli aeronautical engineer. Gil tested his combination of UVC and ozone at University of South Florida. Gil was bought out about three years ago by his partners, who further developed the technology and ran clinical tests. The product went to market in the fourth quarter of 2018.

Those initial owners and one outside investor have provided the capital for Green Earth Medical, now in its second round of fundraising, Beal said.

The company is headquartered in downtown St. Petersburg. It has four full-time employees, and contracts with distributors to market the sanitizing stations. There are about 25 to 30 representatives in the field marketing the product, and the company is in the early stages of talks with more healthcare facilities, as well as clean rooms and labs, Beal said.

The sanitizing stations are the only product right now, but other products are in the process of being patented, he said. He expects to ramp up development on those once the company gains traction.

“We are out trying to market, educate, change perceptions and shift the paradigms that exist around infection controls,” Beal said. “Our goal is to reduce bioburden in every facility that has an immune-compromised population.”

RESOURCE;  https://stpetecatalyst.com/st-pete-tech-company-steps-into-hospital-safety/

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ABC ACTION NEWS INTERVIEW WITH DEBI MORTOCCIO, COO – ADVENTHEALTH  CONNERTON

 

 

Acurx Pharmaceuticals LLC Lead Product ACX-362E Has Successfully Completed First-In-Man Phase I Clinical Trial To Treat C.difficile Infection

 Acurx Pharmaceuticals, LLC is, a privately-held, clinical stage, biopharmaceutical company developing new antibiotics for difficult-to-treat bacterial infections, announced that its lead product candidate, ACX-362E, has successfully completed the 32-subject, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, single-ascending dose portion of this first-in-man Phase 1 clinical trial. ACX-362E is a novel, oral antibacterial agent for the treatment of Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI), an acute, serious, potentially life-threatening, intestinal infection.

ACX-362E is Acurx’s lead compound in a pipeline of molecules that target a previously unexploited mechanism of action, namely, inhibition of the bacterial enzyme DNA polymerase IIIC (pol IIIC).  Pol IIIC is required for DNA replication of many Gram-positive pathogens, including not only Clostridioides but also Enterococcus, Staphylococcus, and Streptococcus.  Although the trial data remain blinded, ongoing monitoring of the data show dose levels up to 600mg have been generally well tolerated. Blood levels of ACX-362E show low systemic exposure, as predicted by prior animal studies and desirable in treating CDI.  Additionally, fecal concentrations of ACX-362E at higher dose levels have exceeded the concentrations known to inhibit C. difficile by several hundred-fold.

“We are very encouraged by these initial data which corroborate our nonclinical findings, showing that at well-tolerated doses ACX-362E reaches concentrations in the colon that are projected to be therapeutically relevant for patients with CDI” said Robert J. DeLuccia, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Acurx.  “This gives us confidence that the ongoing multiple-dose segment of the trial will provide data to guide selection of our Phase 2 dose and improve the probability of success and timeline efficiency of our Phase 2 clinical trial planned to start later this year.”

Dr. Kevin Garey, Professor, University of Houston College of Pharmacy and the Principal Investigator for microbiomic aspects of the Phase 1 clinical trial said: “The emerging fecal concentration data are comparable to those observed with precedent products that have advanced to demonstrate clinical success. I look forward to the multiple-dose safety data and to the results of the microbiomic analyses that our laboratory is performing which will form a template for a new paradigm in microbiome studies associated with drug discovery and development of CDI-directed antibiotics.”

About the Phase 1 Clinical Trial
This Phase 1 trial, conducted in the U.S., is a double-blinded, placebo-controlled study to determine safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and fecal concentrations of ACX-362E in healthy volunteers.  It is being conducted in two parts; first, single ascending doses are administered to four cohorts of 8 subjects each, and second, multiple ascending doses are given that simulate the anticipated clinical treatment regimen. Safety information is analyzed through assessment of adverse events and other standard safety measures, while concentrations of ACX-362E are determined in both the blood and the feces, the latter being the critical site of drug delivery for treating CDI.  In addition, Acurx has partnered with the laboratory of Dr. Kevin Garey at the University of Houston to perform state-of-the-art microbiomic testing of gastrointestinal flora in trial subjects.

About ACX-362E, FDA QIDP and Fast Track Designation
FDA Fast Track Designation is a process designed to facilitate the development and expedite the regulatory pathway of new drugs to treat serious or life-threatening conditions and that fill a high unmet medical need. ACX-362E is a novel, first-in-class, orally-administered antibacterial.  It is the first of a novel class of DNA polymerase IIIC inhibitors under development by Acurx to treat bacterial infections. Acurx acquired ACX-362E from GLSynthesis, Inc. in February 2018.

ACX-362E is a Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) for the treatment of patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI).  Under QIDP designation, ACX-362E will now be eligible to benefit from certain incentives for the development of new antibiotics provided under the Generating Antibiotic Incentives Now Act (the GAIN Act). These incentives include Priority Review and eligibility for Fast Track status. Further, if ultimately approved by the FDA, ACX-362E is eligible for an additional five-year extension of Hatch-Waxman marketing exclusivity. ACX-362E is being developed as a targeted, narrow spectrum oral antibiotic for the treatment of patients with CDI.  Acurx anticipates completing the Phase 1 clinical trial in the second quarter of 2019 and is planning to advance ACX-362E into a Phase 2 clinical trial in the fourth quarter of 2019. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control & Prevention) has designated Clostridium difficile bacteria as an urgent threat highlighting the need for new antibiotics to treat CDI.

RESOURCE:  https://www.acurxpharma.com/news-media/press-releases/detail/8/acurx-announces-first-in-man-clinical-trial-data-of

 

 

First Time Clostridioides difficile Infection Study Reveals Correlation Between Antibiotic Use and CDI Utilizing Data From 2006-2012

ABSTRACT :   Association between Antibiotic Use and Hospital-Onset Clostridioides difficile Infection in U.S. Acute Care Hospitals, 2006-2012: an Ecologic Analysis

“> Sophia V Kazakova, M.D., M.P.H, Ph.D James Baggs, Ph.D L Clifford McDonald, M.D Sarah H Yi, Ph.D Kelly M Hatfield, M.S.P.H Alice Guh, M.D., M.P.H Sujan C Reddy, M.D., M.Sc John A Jernigan, M.D., M.S

Clinical Infectious Diseases, ciz169, https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciz169
Published:
01 March 2019
Article history

Abstract

Background

Unnecessary antibiotic use (AU) contributes to increased rates of Clostridioides difficile Infection (CDI). The impact of antibiotic restriction on hospital-onset CDI (HO-CDI) has not been assessed in a large group of U.S. acute care hospitals (ACHs).

Methods

We examined cross-sectional and temporal associations between rates of hospital-level AU and HO-CDI using data from 549 ACHs. HO-CDI, a discharge with a secondary ICD-9-CM for CDI (008.45) and treatment with metronidazole or oral vancomycin ≥ 3 days after admission. Analyses were performed using multivariable generalized estimating equation models adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics.

Results

During 2006-2012, the unadjusted annual rates of HO-CDI and total AU were 7.3 per 10,000 patient-days (PD) (95% CI: 7.1-7.5) and 811 days of therapy (DOT)/1,000 PD (95% CI: 803-820), respectively. In the cross-sectional analysis, for every 50 DOT/1,000 PD increase in total AU, there was a 4.4% increase in HO-CDI.

For every 10 DOT/1,000 PD increase in use of third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins or carbapenems there was a 2.1% and 2.9% increase in HO-CDI, respectively. In the time-series analysis, the 6 ACHs with a ≥ 30% decrease in total AU had a 33% decrease in HO-CDI (rate ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.47-0.96); ACHs with a ≥ 20% decrease in fluoroquinolone or third- and fourth-generation cephalosporin use had a corresponding decrease in HO-CDI of 8% and 13%, respectively.

Conclusions

At an ecologic level, reductions in total AU, use of fluoroquinolones and third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins were each associated with decreased HO-CDI rates.

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https://academic.oup.com/cid/advance-article/doi/10.1093/cid/ciz169/5367464?fbclid=IwAR0S6XfRWoKTJNmBoZLQicy2BqzuOOyRF9dx2ctQGRn0K9K0m79cr7Or7pQ

Researchers Find Gut Microbes Linked to Depression

Mice experiments and small studies of people with depression have suggested the involvement of the gut microbiome in both behavior and depression, respectively. However, human research addressing how gut microorganisms might contribute to depression—in large samples and considering confounding factors that can affect the microbiota—is lacking.

A new study of two large groups of Europeans, led by Dr. Sara Vieira-Silva and Dr. Jeroen Raes from the Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium), has found new links between gut microbes and depression.

The researchers used 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene sequencing to analyze the fecal microbiota of 1,054 Belgians enrolled in the Flemish Gut Flora Project, aimed at studying gut microbiome variation at population level. Furthermore, microbial taxa were correlated with the participants’ quality of life and incidence of depression, using a self-reported quality of life questionnaire and general practitioner-supplied diagnoses of the latter. The researchers also validated the associations in an independent cohort of 1,063 individuals from the Netherlands’ LifeLines DEEP (LLD) project.

Ten genus abundances were correlated with quality of life scores, including both mental and physical scores. Among these bacterial genera, Faecalibacterium, Coprococcus, Dialister, Butyrivibrio, Gemmiger, Fusicatenibacter and Prevotella were consistently associated with higher quality of life scores, whereas Parabacteroides, Streptococcus and Flavonifractor showed negative associations. After controlling for a wealth of confounding factors, the authors validated some of these associations in the LLD cohort.

The researchers found that Dialister and Coprococcus genera were reduced in people with depression, after taking into account antidepressant drugs as confounders. Furthermore, the authors described an association between enterotype distribution in relation to quality of life scores and diagnosis of depression in the Flemish cohort. For instance, a higher prevalence of Bacteroides enterotype 2 was linked to lower quality of life and depression.

Finally, the authors dug through metagenomic data to create a catalogue describing the gut microbiota’s ability to synthetize or degrade molecules that can cross-talk with the human nervous system. With this aim, Raes and colleagues assessed the distribution of 56 compounds that play an important role in proper nervous system function, which gut microbes either synthesize or metabolize, in human gut-associated microbial genomes (n=532).

Certain neuroactive compounds might explain the beneficial relationship between gut microbes and quality of life. The researchers found, for example, that GABA and tryptophan metabolism pathways were expressed in human gut-associated microorganisms.

Furthermore, some positive correlations were also observed between quality of life and the potential ability of the gut microbiome to produce 3,4-dihydroxyphenyalcetic acid -a breakdown product of the neurotransmitter dopamine-, isovaleric acid and histamine. Of these, the association between 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and quality of life was also replicated in the LLD cohort. As neurotransmitters and neuroactive compounds can also have an impact on bacterial growth, further research is needed to disentangle the contribution of microbe-derived neuroactive molecules to a person’s behavior.

This is the first approach to build a database for studying the gut microbiome’s neuroactive potential and it will help future research to interpret microbiome-gut-mental axis research in a clearer way, supporting the translation of such complex research from the bench to the clinic.

Although these new findings do not prove cause and effect due to the observational design of the study, this research contributes to mounting evidence about mechanisms by which the “microbiome-gut-brain axis” is involved in the development of depression. Further options to experimentally prove the association between the gut microbiota and depression might include rodent models and large studies with enough follow-up periods that explore the role of probiotics, prebiotics, a healthy diet and fecal microbiota transplantation for recovering microbiota, considering the confounding effects of microbiome covariates.

On the whole, this new study strengthens the link between gut bacteria and depression. This is a first step towards understanding how the gut microbiome and its metabolites might affect mood in humans

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link:

https://www.gutmicrobiotaforhealth.com/en/a-large-study-of-belgian-and-dutch-people-finds-new-associations-between-gut-microbes-and-depression/

Researchers at Chinese University of Hong Kong Develop Fluorescent Microrobots to Detect C.diff.

Researchers at Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) have developed fluorescent microrobots that can spot C. diff in a stool sample within a matter of minutes without relying on expensive laboratory equipment.

The technology relies on fungi spore-inspired microrobots that feature fluorescent functionalised carbon nanodots. When the microrobots encounter toxins produced by C. diff, the brightness of the fluorescence changes, something that can be detected with digital photo equipment.

The process is accelerated by the shape and structure of the microrobots, which spread throughout a diluted stool sample and quickly come in contact with as much as the present toxins as possible. This “active” process also helps to detect low concentrations of toxins, according to the researchers.

Additionally, because the microrobots have iron-based nanoparticles in their structure, they can be manipulated by an external magnetic field and gathered together for best visualization.

Study in journal Science Advances: Real-time tracking of fluorescent magnetic spore–based microrobots for remote detection of C. diff toxins

 

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https://www.medgadget.com/2019/02/microrobots-take-minutes-to-detect-c-diff-in-stool-samples.html

Running Out of Options; Bacteriophages to Treat Antibiotic Resistance Infections

Ella Balasa, a 26-year-old from Richmond, Virginia, recently made the news when she was apparently successfully treated for a lung infection using a kind of virus called a bacteriophage. The word “apparently” is important in terms of determining exactly how effective the treatment was, in a clinical sense.

A bacteriophage is a virus that infects bacteria. They aren’t typically used to treat bacterial infections, but in desperate cases, they have been used to treat particularly antibiotic-resistant infections. Such as the one that Balasa was battling.

“I’m really running out of options,” Balasa told AP. “I know it might not have an effect. But I am very hopeful.”

Balasa has cystic fibrosis, which is a disease that affects the lungs, scarring lung tissue, which can trap bacteria. She had picked up an antibiotic-resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. At first, inhaled antibiotics controlled the infection, but then they stopped working. She was placed on intravenous antibiotics, but Balasa didn’t respond to those either.

Balasa took part in a procedure at Yale University that used bacteriophages that attack and kill P. aeruginosa. It was a last-ditch effort to avoid a high-risk lung transplant. She was the eighth patient to try the approach.

The first test case at Yale was an 82-year-old man who was close to death from a heart implant and untreatable pseudomonas infection. Benjamin Chan, a Yale biologist who focuses on phages, purified a phage found in a Connecticut lake that he matched to the patient’s strain of bacteria. With emergency permission from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), physicians tried the purified phage on the man’s infection—successfully. The infection cleared up.

“People’s frustration with antibiotic resistance boiled over,” Chan told. “We’re more appreciative of the fact that we need alternatives.”

Bacteriophages were discovered independently by Frederick Twort in 1915 and Felix d’Herelle in 1917—a full decade before the discovery of penicillin. At that time, they were used to treat dysentery and cholera. But timing is important, and not much was known about viruses and phages at the time—it would be another 25 years, in 1940, before an image of a phage was made using an electron microscope.

And unlike broad-screen antibiotics, strains of phage are specific to strains of bacteria. A broad-screen antibiotic can be used to treat a range of bacterial infections, but phages need to be chosen and purified specific to the infecting bacteria.

On the other hand, as antibiotic-resistance becomes a bigger issue and development of new antibiotics is slow, attention is turning toward the possibilities of phages to treat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. A 2017 article by Veerasak Srisuknimit on the Harvard University blog, wrote, “Now that more and more bacteria have developed resistance to antibiotics, scientists around the world have a renewed interest in phages. The European Union invested 5 million euros in Phagoburn, a project that studies the use of phages to prevent skin infections in burn victims. In the USA, the FDA approved ListShield, a food addictive containing phages, that kills Listeria monocytogenes, one of the most virulent foodborne pathogens and one cause of meningitis. Currently, many clinical trials using phage to treat or prevent bacterial infections such as tuberculosis and MRSA are undergoing.”

And Balasa? She inhaled billions of phages over seven days. It appeared to have an almost immediate effect, although it took several weeks for her to feel better. And during that period she began retaking some antibiotics she had abandoned. As AP notes, without a formal study it’s hard to say just how successful the approach was, but the tests “suggest phages killed much of her predominant pseudomonas strain and made the survivors sensitive again to a course of those antibiotics.”

She was able to quit the antibiotics, but a second round of a different strain of phages did not seem to show more improvement. “The true test,” Balasa told AP, “is how long I can go without using any antibiotics again.”

By Mark Terry

 

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https://www.pharmalive.com/bacteriophages-to-the-rescue-a-possible-approach-to-antibiotic-resistance/