Author Archives: cdifffoundation

A Global Stroll In the Park To Raise C. diff. Awareness On September 25th

Join Us For a Stroll In the Park on September 25th In-Person, and On-Line To Raise C. diff. Awareness Around the Globe!

 

 

 

 

September 25th is right around the corner and we are so excited to have this opportunity to walk together either in-person at the following park locations:

Sims Park, New Port Richey, FL

Milton A. Votee Park, Teaneck, NJ 

Brown Street Park Complex, Spring City, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are truly grateful for your efforts, support, and participation of the Annual Walk events and it will be amazing to walk, or stroll,  with you on a path in a local park, or virtually on a path across the globe on September 25th from 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. EST

 

Walking, and Strolling,  is a fun, and relaxing way  to enjoy a change of scenery. Taking a stroll among the pleasant sights and sounds of nature, in-person or online,  has the ability to renew the mind and body simultaneously. Walking with your family, and friends, for a cause is even better ~ as you join the many C. diff. Awareness Walkers around the world sharing time to Raise C. diff. Awareness while spending time together to enjoy a way to add a little extra positive activity of the day.

All Registered Awareness Walkers will receive:

A C. diff. Awareness T-Shirt
C. diff. Awareness Literature and Giveaways,
The opportunity to “Raise C. diff. Awareness” together worldwide!
* Children 10 years of age and under walk for free!

  • All items will be sent directly to all registered Awareness Walkers to the address provided in the registration.

To Register For This Global Event, Please Click On The Button Below:

 

 

 

 

 

SPONSORS

We thank the Sponsors for their support of the global walks, and for joining us in  “Raising C. diff. Awareness” across the globe.

Click on the graphics below to visit the Sponsor’s website and learn more about the organizations that are making a difference in the C. diff. community worldwide.

 

 

 

 

We are looking forward to seeing you in September!

If you have any questions — please direct them to info@cdifffoundation.org or telephone the main C Diff Foundation office:  +1 (727) 205-3922

 


2020 C. diff. Awareness Walkers

C. diff. Spores and More Live Broadcast to Podcast Is Available: Prevent CDI: Boost Immunity, Restore Microbiome, Replace the Bug

 

We are pleased to share  “C. diff. Spores and More ”  with you because, as advocates of  C. diff.,  we know the importance of this cutting-edge new weekly radio show and what it means for our Foundation’s community worldwide.

 

 

July 20, 2021:  Prevent CDI: Boost Immunity, Restore Microbiome, Replace the Bug

With Guests:

Neil Clark, Chief Executive Officer, Destiny Pharma, PLC

Mr. Clark qualified as an accountant with PwC in Cambridge, UK and worked for over ten years on a variety of national and international assignments in audit, corporate finance and consultancy. In 1997, Mr Clark joined CeNeS Pharmaceuticals plc, a venture capital backed private UK biotech company. Following the successful flotation of CeNeS in 1999, he was appointed CFO. In 2005, he became CEO and led the company through to its sale in 2008. He then joined Ergomed in January 2009 and was CFO during its IPO in July 2014. Mr. Clark joined Destiny Pharma as CEO in early 2017. Mr. Clark is a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales and has a BSc in Bioscience from the University of Nottingham.

Dale Gerding, MD, FACP, FIDSA, FSHEA

Dr. Dale Gerding is Research Physician at the Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital and Professor of Medicine (Retired) at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. He is an infectious diseases specialist and hospital epidemiologist, past president of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. He is a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, is a Master of the American College of Physicians and the 2013 recipient of the William Middleton Award, the highest research award given by the Department of Veterans Affairs. He is board certified in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases. His major research interest is in the epidemiology, prevention and treatment of Clostridioides difficile infection and he is the discoverer of non-toxigenic C. difficile strain M3. (NTCD-M3)

https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/132305/prevent-cdi-boost-immunity-restore-microbiome-replace-the-bug

Neil Clark, Chief Executive Officer, Destiny Pharma PLC and Dale Gerding, MD, FACP, FIDSA, FSHEA, with our Guest Host: Kevin Hersh, shared a robust discussion which touched upon important topics focused on the what, why, and how to Prevent a C. diff. infection: Boost Immunity, Restore Microbiome, Replace the Bug. Our guests exchanged a dialogue about the science to answer the many questions about a C. difficile infection, prevention, treatments, what is recurrent C. diff., and the immune system, and how the microbiome plays a part in everything.  Click on the link provided above to access the archived episode and expand your basic CDI knowledge today.

Did You Know That Drying Your Hands Is Just As Important As Washing Them?

When it comes to keeping a health crisis at bay, washing your hands really does go a long way. However, you probably didn’t know that drying your hands can be just as important as washing them. “After washing your hands, it is so crucial that you dry your hands thoroughly,” Nesochi Okeke-Igbokwe, MD, a physician, and health expert says. Wet hands easily transfer or pick up germs. You could drip bacteria-infected water—and anything wet hands touch could become contaminated, according to David Cutler, MD, a family medicine physician at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California. Bacteria is more likely to transfer from wet skin than from dry skin.

Some research shows there is a superior drying method

Taking the 20 to 30 seconds to wash your hands, especially after touching these germy things, is only as cleanly as drying them afterward. “One goal is to ensure that you do not re-contaminate the hands with bacteria in the process of washing or drying the hands,” Okeke-Igbokwe says. So if you have the option to dry your hands with paper towels, cloth towels, or an air-dryer, it’s more important to choose one rather than leave your hands to air dry. However, some research shows there is a superior way to dry your hands—with paper towels.

According to research from Mayo Clinic, electric air hand driers actually have the potential to spread bacteria by blowing the pathogens right back onto your hands after washing, Okeke-Igbokwe explains. “Using hand dryers in public restrooms is the worst way to dry your washed hands,” Dr. Cutler says. “Hand dryers pose risks especially to young people whose face may be at the nozzle level and breathe in the bacteria or get injured by the heat.” Another study from Westminster University found the most powerful hand driers can spread a virus up to one and a half meters or almost five feet across the room.

Although some experts still debate this topic, drying your hands with a clean, single-use hand towel may be the safer choice to reduce the risk of spreading germs, according to Okeke-Igbokwe.

Bottom line: Always dry your hands

The least-safe option is not drying your hands at all. Ranekka Dean, the Director of Infection Control at NYU Winthrop Hospital in Long Island notes that studies on each drying method have strengths and weaknesses, but as long as your hands are completely dry you’re making a healthy choice.

“The decision to use a specific drying method may be determined by several factors, including practicality, personal preference, cost, space, and availability.” And if you use a bath towel, remember how bad it is not to wash it every week.

 

Source: https://www.rd.com/article/most-hygienic-way-to-dry-your-hands/?_cmp=readuprdus&_ebid=readuprdus7142021&_mid=427379&ehid=24F396C6AE5CD7B2B5DC3659593C57BAA4206229

American College of Gastroenterology Issued New Guidelines On Management Of Clostridioides difficile (C. diff., C. difficile, CDI)

The American College of Gastroenterology has issued new guidelines on the management of Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI), with recommendations reflecting developments from the availability of biologics to the growing use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT).

“These guidelines are a step forward in our understanding of C. difficile,” commented Sahil Khanna, MBBS, MS, a professor of medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who was not involved in the guideline development.

“For the practicing provider, there are some big changes in the treatment and testing of the disease,” Dr. Khanna said. For example, although the 2013 ACG guidelines on the topic recommended metronidazole or vancomycin for treatment of a first mild to moderate episode of CDI, he said, the new guidelines now suggest vancomycin or fidaxomicin (Dificid, Merck) for a first episode of non-fulminant CDI. Metronidazole now is suggested only as treatment for initial non-severe CDI in very low-risk patients.

“Metronidazole has already been on the decline in clinical use, and I think these guidelines will lead to further reduction of its use,” Dr. Khanna said.

A notable update in the new guidelines is a recommendation that bezlotoxumab (Zinplava, Merck) be considered for the prevention of CDI recurrence in patients at high risk for recurrence, he said. “This is the first time bezlotoxumab has made it into a major society guideline for the gastroenterology and infectious disease community, and I think it will help get the drug covered more often by payors and make it available more widely to the practicing clinician.”

ACG 2021
Annual Scientific Meeting & Postgraduate Course

The Premier GI Clinical Meeting
& Postgraduate Course

October 22-27, 2021 • Mandalay Bay

Another update that reflects the evolving body of evidence that has emerged over the past several years is a strong recommendation that FMT be considered for use after two CDI recurrences, or in patients with severe and fulminant CDI refractory to antibiotic therapy, particularly when they are poor surgical candidates, Dr. Khanna said. “The previous recommendation in 2013 was to consider FMT, but the body of research has grown to demonstrate its efficacy,” he said.

The guideline authors recommend that FMT be repeated for patients experiencing a recurrence of CDI within eight weeks of an initial FMT. In addition, for patients with recurrent CDI who are not candidates for FMT, have relapsed after FMT, or require ongoing or frequent courses of antibiotics, the guidelines suggest using long-term suppressive oral vancomycin.

For patients with a first recurrence of CDI, the guidelines suggest use of tapering or pulsed-dose vancomycin or fidaxomicin if patients were previously administered vancomycin or metronidazole.

The guidelines recommend testing only of patients with symptoms suggestive of active CDI and use of a highly sensitive and specific CDI testing algorithm to help distinguish between colonization and active infection.

According to the guidelines, severe CDI is diagnosed if the white blood cell count is 15,000 cells/mm3 or higher or serum creatinine is greater than 1.5 mg/dL, and fulminant CDI should be diagnosed if the patient has hypotension, shock, ileus or megacolon in the presence of typical CDI symptoms.

For patients with fulminant CDI, the guideline authors urge adequate volume resuscitation and oral vancomycin for the first 48 to 72 hours, with the possible addition of parenteral metronidazole, and use of vancomycin enemas for patients with an ileus.

The panel also recommends against discontinuing antisecretory therapy when it is indicated in patients with CDI. They also include a recommendation against the use of probiotics to prevent CDI or recurrent CDI.

There are several recommendations specifically targeted to the inflammatory bowel disease population, including CDI testing of IBD patients presenting with an acute flare and diarrhea. Other population-specific recommendations target patients who are pregnant, lactating or immunocompromised.

 

ACG 2021
Annual Scientific Meeting & Postgraduate Course

The Premier GI Clinical Meeting
& Postgraduate Course

October 22-27, 2021 • Mandalay Bay

 

In-Home Enrollment Of Randomized Controlled Trials Finds To Be An Innovative Method Improving Access To Clinical Research

Abstract

Introduction: Clostridioides difficile infection is the leading cause of infectious diarrhea in the United States, with substantial morbidity and mortality. Recurrent infection is especially challenging, with each recurrence increasing the likelihood of a successive recurrence, leading to cycles of prolonged symptoms, frequent antimicrobial use, and decreased quality of life. Fecal microbiota transplantation to prevent recurrent infection is a promising intervention with a large effect size in observational studies, but with conflicting results from randomized controlled trials. We are conducting a Veterans Affairs-wide randomized controlled trial utilizing centralized case identification, with enrollment and fecal microbiota transplant administration occurring at the participant’s home. This type of trial design significantly improves trial efficiency, greatly decreases trial cost, increases consistency of trial administration, and most importantly makes nationwide clinical trials in less-common diseases possible.

Methods: This is a randomized comparison of capsule-delivered fecal microbiota transplant for the prevention of recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection, administered after successful initial treatment of recurrent C. difficile infection with standard therapy. The primary endpoint is the incidence of recurrent C. difficile infection or death. Cases are identified by searching the Veterans Affairs Corporate Data Warehouse, with central study coordinators then reaching out to potential participants. Individuals meeting inclusion criteria and interested in participation are scheduled for in-home consent, randomization, and capsule administration, followed by telephone follow-up for 6 months. To mitigate risks of COVID-19, enrollment via video visits has been implemented.

Results: A total of 102 participants have been enrolled through January 2021. Centralized case identification and in-home enrollment has facilitated enrollment from 34 unique states, with 38% being from rural or highly rural areas.

Discussion: Centralized case identification and in-home enrollment is a feasible and innovative method of conducting randomized controlled trials in the Veterans Affairs system, improving access to clinical research for populations who may have difficulty engaging with the traditional model of clinical trials where enrollment is based at large hospitals in major metropolitan areas.

Keywords: Fecal microbiota transplant; centralized enrollment; Clostridioides difficile; diarrhea; randomization; recurrence; stool transplant.

source:  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34154439/