Category Archives: Clinical Trials

MGB Biopharma (MGB) Prepares To Launch a Phase II Clinical Trial Of Its Anti-bacterial Agent MGB-BP-3

A new drug aimed at treating potentially deadly Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infections is set to be tested on patients for the first time.

Glasgow-based life sciences firm MGB Biopharma (MGB) said it was preparing to launch a Phase II clinical trial of its anti-bacterial agent MGB-BP-3.

The trial is expected to involve 30 patients based in North America.

All have been diagnosed with C.diff-associated disease (CDAD).

C.diff infections can cause diarrhoea and fever.

They have been a major problem in hospitals around the world, with thousands of deaths in the US alone linked to the bug each year.

The bacteria are able to take over the gut when a course of antibiotics kills off the bugs that normally live there.

MGB’s announcement came after it raised £1.3m from investors for trials of the new drug, which was invented at the University of Strathclyde.

The funding round was led by Edinburgh-based Archangels, with co-funding from a range of sources, including the Scottish Investment Bank, Barwell and Melrose-based Tri Capital.

The cash supplements a £2.7m grant awarded earlier this year by Innovate UK.

SOURCE:  https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-scotland-business-45508036

MGB said its trial would “evaluate safety and tolerability, efficacy and in particular look for improvement in global (or sustained) cure rates”.

Chief executive Dr Miroslav Ravic said: “We are already witnessing renewed interest in our new anti-bacterial agent and its trial in key medical centres in North America where CDAD is particularly prevalent.

“This offers opportunities both to progress the study rapidly and to attract increased attention to the results for this important trial.”

The company said it was aiming to start the trials in areas of the US and Canada with a high incidence of CDAD early next year.

Ferring Pharmaceuticals Acquires Rebiotix, Inc.

Ferring acquires innovative biotechnology company and microbiome pioneer Rebiotix Inc.

  • Rebiotix’s RBX2660 is a non-antibiotic treatment in Phase 3 development for the prevention of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and has the potential to be the world’s first approved human microbiome product
  • CDI is one of the most common healthcare-associated infections in the US, affecting more than 500,000 people and causing approximately 29,000 deaths each year.1
  • Ferring’s global capabilities ensure broader patient access to any future approved human microbiome treatments derived from Rebiotix’s Microbiota Restoration Therapy™ (MRT™) drug platform

Saint-Prex, Switzerland & Roseville, MN, US – 05 April, 2018 — Ferring Pharmaceuticals* and Rebiotix Inc.  announce that they have agreed to the acquisition of Rebiotix by Ferring. This acquisition brings together two innovative healthcare companies that share a common commitment to exploring and understanding the human microbiome to develop new solutions for patients.

The most advanced investigational microbiome treatment from Rebiotix is RBX2660, a non-antibiotic treatment currently in Phase 3 development for the prevention of recurrent CDI. RBX2660 has the potential to be the first human microbiome product approved anywhere in the world. In the US, RBX2660 has received FDA Fast Track, Breakthrough Therapy and Orphan Drug Designations, which means the FDA considers it eligible for Expedited Review, once the submission has been made.

“The scientific advances Rebiotix has made add significant strategic value to Ferring’s leadership in gastroenterology,” said Michel Pettigrew, President of the Executive Board and Chief Operating Officer, Ferring Pharmaceuticals. “Therapies targeted towards the microbiome have the potential to transform healthcare. Together, we have a unique opportunity to help people living with debilitating and life-threatening conditions like Clostridium difficile infection.”

Rebiotix’s proprietary MRT drug platform delivers healthy, live, human-derived microbes into the gastrointestinal tract. It provides a standardised, stabilised product that is ready-to-use in an easy-to-administer format. The MRT pipeline consists of a number of investigational treatments including RBX7455, a non-frozen, lyophilised oral capsule formulation, in development for the prevention of recurrent CDI.

“Ferring shares our passion for understanding the role the microbiome plays in human health and has global capabilities that offer huge potential for the investigational therapies that we have in development,” said Lee Jones, Founder, President and Chief Executive Officer, Rebiotix, Inc. “Rebiotix was founded to revolutionise healthcare by harnessing the power of the human microbiome and this is a significant milestone in achieving that goal.”

“This acquisition strengthens our innovation pipeline and complements our own ongoing microbiome research as well as our partnerships with world-leading organisations in this area,” said Per Falk, Chief Science Officer, Ferring Pharmaceuticals. “Rebiotix’s culture and passion for high quality, innovative research fits with our own and complements our existing R&D capabilities.”

In addition to the acquisition of Rebiotix, Ferring, as a leader in gastroenterology, is supported by ongoing partnerships with world-leading research organisations in the field of microbiome research including the Karolinska Institutet and Science for Life Laboratory, the Centre for Translational Microbiome Research, Intralytix, The Institut Pasteur, the University of Lille, MyBiotics Pharma, March of Dimes and Metabogen.


About Ferring Pharmaceuticals

Ferring Pharmaceuticals is a research-driven, specialty biopharmaceutical group committed to helping people around the world build families and live better lives. Headquartered in Saint-Prex, Switzerland, Ferring is a leader in reproductive medicine and women’s health, and in specialty areas within gastroenterology and urology. Ferring has been developing treatments for mothers and babies for over 50 years. Today, over one third of the company’s research and development investment goes towards finding innovative and personalised healthcare solutions to help mothers and babies, from conception to birth. Founded in 1950, Ferring now employs approximately 6,500 people worldwide, has its own operating subsidiaries in nearly 60 countries and markets its products in 110 countries.

Learn more at www.ferring.com, or connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and YouTube.

About Rebiotix Inc.

Rebiotix Inc. is a late-stage clinical microbiome company focused on harnessing the power of the human microbiome to revolutionise the treatment of challenging diseases. Rebiotix possesses a deep and diverse clinical pipeline targeting several other disease states with drug products built on its pioneering MRT platform. The MRT platform is a standardised, stabilised drug technology that is designed to rehabilitate the human microbiome by delivering a broad consortium of live microbes into a patient’s intestinal tract via a ready-to-use and easy-to-administer format. For more information on Rebiotix and its pipeline of human microbiome-directed therapies, visit www.rebiotix.com.

About RBX2660

RBX2660 is the most advanced product utilising Rebiotix’s proprietary MRT drug platform. RBX2660 is in Phase 3 development for the prevention of recurrent CDI and has the potential to be the first human microbiome product approved anywhere in the world. It consists of a microbiota suspension of intestinal microbes and is administered via enema.

*Ferring Holding Inc. signed the agreement as part of Ferring Pharmaceuticals Group

Immuron Announced First Patients Enrolled In Phase 1/2 (first-in-human) Clinical Trials For Immuron’s IMM-529 For Treatment of C.difficile Infections

The Australian biopharmaceutical company Immuron announced that the first patients have enrolled in phase 1/2 (first-in-human) clinical trials for Immuron’s IMM-529, an oral immunotherapeutic medication for treatment of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI).

As published in MD Mag February 16, 2018

To review this publication in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

http://www.mdmag.com/medical-news/a-powerful-new-weapon-in-the-fight-against-clostridium-difficile-infection

According to Dan Peres, MD, senior vice president and head of medical development at Immuron, IMM-529 “has shown promise in successfully treating Clostridium-difficile” through its “unique delivery of antibodies.”

If the trials are successful, IMM-529 may be a powerful new weapon in the global fight against CDI. Peres reports that IMM-529 that has been effective in preclinical studies for prophylactic use, treatment of disease, and the prevention of recurrence in relation to CDI, and that the company is excited to enroll the first patients.

The placebo-controlled study to test the safety, tolerability and efficacy of IMM-529 will take place at Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem and include 60 CDI diagnosed patients in the 28 day study.

Patients enrolled in the study, led by Yoseph Caraco, MD, head of the clinical pharmacology unit at Hadassah Medical Center, will receive IMM-529 or a placebo 3 times a day during the 28 -day trial period, and be monitored for 2 additional months, determining any recurrence of the disease.

In a statement, Caraco said that he was optimistic about IMM-529 based on pre-clinical trial results and that IMM-529 could “be the answer we’re all looking for” when it comes to treatment of CDI.

IMM-529 targets CDI in 2 ways: by neutralizing toxin B (TcdB), a cytotoxin responsible for inflammation and diarrhea that characterizes CDI, and by binding Clostridium difficile spores and vegetative cells preventing further colonization. Caraco reported that IMM-529 approaches CDI by “targeting the main virulence factors of the disease with only minor disturbance to the natural biome” which could be extremely valuable in treating CDI.

In the earlier pre-clinical proof-of-concept study by led by Dena Lyras, MD, PhD with Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, IMM-529 was shown to be 80% effective in both the treatment of and prevention of CDI without the use of antibiotics.

In a December 2015 statement from Immuron, Lyras stated that she was “excited by the potential of these therapeutics in treating patients with both the acute and the relapse phase, of the disease.”

According to data supplied by the American Gastroenterological Association, approximately 500,000 people in the US are diagnosed with CDI each year, and CDI-associated deaths range from 14,000 to 30,000 per year.

In the European Union, according to a 2016 study led by Alessandro Cassini, MD, with the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control in Stockholm, Sweden, more than 150,000 cases of hospital-acquired CDI infections (134,053–173,089; 95% CI) occur each year.

According to Immuron, the cost of CDI globally (calculated by CIDRAP, the Center for Infectious Disease and Policy at the University of Minnesota) is an estimated annual economic burden of more than $10 billion and increases in hypervirulent and antibiotic-resistant strains have led to CDI becoming a major medical concern.

Caraco stated that CDI poses “a growing risk amongst a greater population of patients, including those recently treated with antibiotics, the elderly, institutionalized and hospitalized.”

If IMM-529 is found to be safe and effective in clinical trials, it could prove a significant boon to the global fight against CDI at all 3 stages of the disease.

Learn More About Clostridium difficile (C.diff., C.difficile) infection and Recurrent CDI Clinical Trials In Progress

 

 

 

The C Diff Foundation has implemented a global campaign to raise awareness of Clostridium difficile infection (C.difficile) clinical trials, clinical studies, clinical research and observational studies evaluating interventions for C. difficile prevention, treatments, and environmental safety.

In the USA: Nearly half a million Americans suffer from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released in 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of C. difficile. Of those, about 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly attributable to C. difficile infections making C. difficile a very important cause of infectious disease death in the United States.

“Clostridium difficile infections are not only the most common cause of healthcare-acquired infections in the United States but also very common in the community in younger patients who previously were thought to be less susceptible to C. difficile. The rate of recurrent C. difficile infections is increasing tremendously and this increase is higher than the rate of primary C. difficile infections,” stated Sahil Khanna, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Director of the C. difficile Clinic, Fecal Microbiota Transplantation program and C. difficile related Clinical Trials, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Dr. Khanna also added, “It is imperative and important for clinical trials to be done to advance the development of new treatments, new medications, and new ways to prevent and treat Clostridium difficile infections.”

Individuals volunteer to participate in clinical trials in hopes of improving their own health, to access treatments that might not be available otherwise, often because they are new and not yet widely available. They help others by contributing to advances in medicine. There can also be potential risks participating in clinical trials and clinical studies. All of the known risks associated with a particular trial and or study will be discussed during the informed consent process. It will be thoroughly explained in the informed consent document that a volunteer will receive from the research staff prior to participating in any study.

To learn more about clinical research (e.g., Clostridium difficile, C.difficile) visit the U.S. Food and Drug Administration http://www.fda.gov or telephone 1-800-835-4709, The National Institutes of Health (NIH) http://www.nih.gov and ClinicalTrials.gov.

“Clinical trials are vital to improving our knowledge about how best to prevent and treat C. difficile infections. Informing patients of clinical trials is important, and in recent years several clinical trials have led to significant improvements in the treatments available for patients with C. difficile infections,” stated Mark Wilcox, MD, FRCPath, Consultant Microbiologist, Head of Microbiology and Academic Lead of Pathology Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Professor of Medical Microbiology University of Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Lead on Clostridium difficile for Public Health England, UK.

About the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA):
The FDA is responsible for protecting the public health by assuring that foods are safe, wholesome, sanitary and properly labeled; ensuring that human and veterinary drug, and vaccines and other biological products and medical devices intended for human use are safe and effective. FDA’s responsibilities extend to the 50 United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and other U.S. territories and possessions.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH):
The National Institutes of Health (NIH), a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is the nation’s medical research agency making important discoveries that improve health and save lives.

About ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov is a Web-based resource that provides patients, their family members, health care professionals, researchers, and the public with easy access to information on publicly and privately supported clinical studies on a wide range of diseases and conditions.

Sanofi Pasteur Ends Development of C. difficile Vaccine

Sanofi Pasteur SA  Pharmaceutical company announced on Friday, December 1, 2017  that it had ended development of an experimental vaccine for Clostridium difficile infection, after an early look at late-stage trial results indicated a low probability for success.

About three million Americans are infected annually with the bacterium – also known as C. diff – ———

The move marks the second blow in a week to Sanofi’s vaccine program after the Paris-based company on Wednesday said use of its new dengue vaccine will be strictly limited due to evidence it can worsen the disease in people who have not previously been exposed to the mosquito-borne virus.

Sanofi’s Dengvaxia vaccine is the world’s first approved shot for preventing dengue infection, which kills about 20,000 people a year and infects hundreds of millions.

The company said in a statement that all data from vaccinated volunteers in the C. diff trial will continue to be analyzed for more information and shared with the scientific community.

As many as 30,000 Americans die each year from the bacterium, usually after recurrences of infection. The infections are typically the result of taking antibiotics, which wipe out friendly bacteria in the colon that normally keep C. diff under control.

Sanofi said it will continue to focus on six other vaccine projects in development.

To view article in its entirety please click on the following link:

https://www.reuters.com/article/markets-swiss-stocks/swiss-stocks-factors-to-watch-on-dec-4-idUSL8N1O14KZ

Minnesota Has Declared November “C. difficile Infection Awareness Month

 

 

 

 

http://www.clipsyndicate.com/video/play/7172019

According to research, C. Diff is the most common infection in U.S. hospitals within the last decade.

The state of Minnesota has declared November C. difficile Infection Awareness Month.” According to research, C. Diff is the most common infection in U.S. hospitals within the last decade.

Doctors at Mayo Clinic want people to know that they can get the infection even outside of hospitals. They also say once you get it, it’s easier to get it each time.

Dr. Sahil Khanna said ways to prevent C. diff is to wash hands and avoid unnecessary antibiotics.

He said Mayo Clinic is also studying whether or not there could be a vaccination for C. Diff.

“So there’s a large multi-center study that’s going on right now in people who may be at risk for C. Diff infection,” Khanna said. “So if you’ve been to the hospital, if you’ve received antibiotics, those patients can be enrolled in a vaccine study to see if this vaccine would prevent C. Diff from happening.”

Mayo Clinic is also working with Minnesota-based company Rebiotix on another form of treatment for the infection where people can simply ingest a tablet.

“Newer studies are being derived where you can actually take material from donor stool, process donor stool in a lab, and derive all the good bacteria that you need from the donor stool and put them in capsule form,” Khanna said.

Khanna said this capsule-based treatment has more advantages than a colonoscopy-based treatment that is currently being used to treat C. Diff.

 

Rebiotix Features Three Posters Highlighting RBX2660 Clinical and Microbiome Data at ID Week™ 2017 in San Diego, October 4th – 8th

Positive Topline Data from Open-Label Phase 2 Trial of RBX2660 in Recurrent Clostridium
difficile to be Presented for First Time

 

 

 

Rebiotix Inc., a clinical-stage microbiome company focused
on harnessing the power of the human microbiome to treat challenging diseases, today announced that three posters highlighting RBX2660 clinical and microbiome data will be featured at ID Week™ 2017 in San Diego, Oct. 4th to the 8th.

The posters describe clinical findings that highlight the key changes to
the human microbiome profiles of patients who received RBX2660, Rebotix’s Phase 3 drug candidate.

For the first time, researchers will discuss findings from the open-label Phase 2 trial of RBX2660 for the prevention of recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infection. Data indicated that RBX2660 was well tolerated and achieved the primary efficacy endpoint of preventing C. diff. recurrence; patients treated with RBX2660 exhibited a treatment success rate of 78.8% compared with a historical control of 51.8% (p<0.0001, N=242). These results demonstrate a 55% reduction in recurrence for those patients treated with RBX2660 compared to the historical controls reflecting standard-of-care antibiotics today.

RBX2660 is currently being evaluated in a multinational Phase 3 clinical trial for the prevention of recurrent C. diff.  Researchers will also be presenting two posters on the microbiome analyses of the Phase 2B  randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial of RBX2660. The analyses, utilizing leading  edge genomic sequencing technology to measure the patient’s microbiome, provide measurable  evidence of RBX2660’s rehabilitative effect on human microbiome profiles of patients who were successfully treated with Rebiotix’s microbiota drug technology.

“The clinical potential of RBX2660 has been highlighted in multiple trials, including our recently
completed open-label Phase 2 study, and the data being presented at ID Week enables us to more fully understand RBX2660’s ability to rehabilitate a dysbiotic intestinal microbiome,” commented Lee Jones, president and CEO of Rebiotix. “These findings are important in that not only can we observe the clinical 2 effect of RB X2660, such as in the open-label Phase 2 study, but by analyzing the microbiota of RBX2660-treated patients, we can see how the microbiome changes in response to RBX2660 treatment and how those changes correlate to treatment success and to the microbiomes of healthy individuals.”

The first poster (#1863; to be presented Friday, Oct. 6th), titled RBX2660 is Safe, Superior to Antibiotic- Treated Controls for Preventing Recurrent Clostridium difficile, and May Rehabilitate Patient Microbiomes:  Open Label Trial Results, reported data from an open-label Phase 2 study of RBX2660 that included 242 subjects. Data from the study indicated that RBX2660’s efficacy in preventing recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI) was higher (78.8%) than CDI-free rates in the Historical Control Group (51.8%, p<0.0001). The reduction in recurrence of C. diff between these two arms is approximately 55%. Moreover, the safety profile of RBX2660 was consistent with results from previous clinical trials, and microbiota analysis suggested that RBX2660 may rehabilitate patient microbiota as RBX2660-treated subjects’ microbiomes were significantly altered compared to baseline and more closely resembled the RBX2660 microbiome profile than at baseline (p<0.05 by Dirichlet multinomial Wald-type pairwise hypothesis test).

The second poster (#1267; to be presented Saturday, Oct, 7th), titled Successful Response to
Microbiota-Based Drug RBX2660 in Patients with Recurrent Clostridium Difficile Infection is Associated with More Pronounced Alterations in Microbiome Profile, involved an analysis of 58 patients whose stool samples were collected in the randomized Phase 2B clinical trial to determine the effect of RBX2660 on rCDI patient microbiomes. 16s RNA sequencing analyses of patients’ microbiomes indicated that RBX2660 treatment shifted the relative microbiome densities, with taxa-specific increase in Bacteroidia, Clostridia, and decrease in Gamma-proteobacteria abundance. Importantly, a larger shift from baseline microbiome was seen in responders to RBX2600 compared to non-responders, and RBX2660 treatment appears to increase microbiome diversity.

 

The third poster (#1870; to be presented Saturday, Oct. 7th), titled Microbiome Profile is Distinct in Patients with Successful Response to Microbiota-Based Drug RBX2660 Relative to Placebo Responders involved a sub-analysis of 57 patients who participated in the randomized Phase 2B clinical trial of RBX2660. 16s rRNA sequencing analysis was used to compare the microbiome changes from baseline of patients classified as responders to RBX2660 vs placebo. Investigators determined that RBX2660 treatment for rCDI is associated with greater changes in patient microbiomes than placebo treatment. Notably, at 7, 30 and 60 days, microbiomes from RBX2660-treated patients had high Kullback-Leibler divergence from baseline and significantly different means from baseline (p<0.001). Further, active responders trended toward higher Bacteroides and lower Gamma-proteobacteria and Bacilli after treatment, both of which are characteristic of a healthier microbiome. According to the 3 researchers, these changes are consistent with the hypothesis that RBX2660 can restore a healthier microbiome in rCDI patients.

Rebiotix, Inc. funded all three studies.

For More Information About Rebiotix Please

Click On the Following Link:

http://www.rebiotix.com