Category Archives: Infection Control

Did You Know That Drying Your Hands Is Just As Important As Washing Them?

When it comes to keeping a health crisis at bay, washing your hands really does go a long way. However, you probably didn’t know that drying your hands can be just as important as washing them. “After washing your hands, it is so crucial that you dry your hands thoroughly,” Nesochi Okeke-Igbokwe, MD, a physician, and health expert says. Wet hands easily transfer or pick up germs. You could drip bacteria-infected water—and anything wet hands touch could become contaminated, according to David Cutler, MD, a family medicine physician at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California. Bacteria is more likely to transfer from wet skin than from dry skin.

Some research shows there is a superior drying method

Taking the 20 to 30 seconds to wash your hands, especially after touching these germy things, is only as cleanly as drying them afterward. “One goal is to ensure that you do not re-contaminate the hands with bacteria in the process of washing or drying the hands,” Okeke-Igbokwe says. So if you have the option to dry your hands with paper towels, cloth towels, or an air-dryer, it’s more important to choose one rather than leave your hands to air dry. However, some research shows there is a superior way to dry your hands—with paper towels.

According to research from Mayo Clinic, electric air hand driers actually have the potential to spread bacteria by blowing the pathogens right back onto your hands after washing, Okeke-Igbokwe explains. “Using hand dryers in public restrooms is the worst way to dry your washed hands,” Dr. Cutler says. “Hand dryers pose risks especially to young people whose face may be at the nozzle level and breathe in the bacteria or get injured by the heat.” Another study from Westminster University found the most powerful hand driers can spread a virus up to one and a half meters or almost five feet across the room.

Although some experts still debate this topic, drying your hands with a clean, single-use hand towel may be the safer choice to reduce the risk of spreading germs, according to Okeke-Igbokwe.

Bottom line: Always dry your hands

The least-safe option is not drying your hands at all. Ranekka Dean, the Director of Infection Control at NYU Winthrop Hospital in Long Island notes that studies on each drying method have strengths and weaknesses, but as long as your hands are completely dry you’re making a healthy choice.

“The decision to use a specific drying method may be determined by several factors, including practicality, personal preference, cost, space, and availability.” And if you use a bath towel, remember how bad it is not to wash it every week.

 

Source: https://www.rd.com/article/most-hygienic-way-to-dry-your-hands/?_cmp=readuprdus&_ebid=readuprdus7142021&_mid=427379&ehid=24F396C6AE5CD7B2B5DC3659593C57BAA4206229

Researchers Conduct Study To Establish a Quantitative Correlation Between Applied Alcohol-Based Hand Rub ABHR Volume and Achieved Hand Coverage Utilizing an Innovate Quantitative Evaluation System

A large-scale investigation of alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR) volume: hand coverage correlations utilizing an innovative quantitative evaluation system

  • Constantinos Voniatis,
  • Száva Bánsághi,
  • Andrea Ferencz &
  • Tamás Haidegger

 

Abstract

Background

Current hand hygiene guidelines do not provide recommendations on a specific volume for the clinical hand rubbing procedure. According to recent studies volume should be adjusted in order to achieve complete coverage. However, hand size is a parameter that highly influences the hand coverage quality when using alcohol-based hand rubs (ABHR). The purpose of this study was to establish a quantitative correlation between applied ABHR volume and achieved hand coverage.

Method

ABHR based hand hygiene events were evaluated utilizing a digital health device, the Semmelweis hand hygiene system with respect to coverage achieved on the skin surface. Medical students and surgical residents (N = 356) were randomly selected and given predetermined ABHR volumes. Additionally, hand sizes were calculated using specialized software developed for this purpose. Drying time, ABHR volume awareness, as well spillage awareness were documented for each hand hygiene event.

Results

Hand coverage achieved during a hand hygiene event strongly depends on the applied ABHR volume. At a 1 ml dose, the uncovered hand area was approximately 7.10%, at 2 ml it decreased to 1.68%, and at 3 ml it further decreased to 1.02%. The achieved coverage is strongly correlated to hand size, nevertheless, a 3 ml applied volume proved sufficient for most hand hygiene events (84%). When applying a lower amount of ABHR (1.5 ml), even people with smaller hands failed to cover their entire hand surface. Furthermore, a 3 ml volume requires more than the guideline prescribed 20–30 s to dry. In addition, results suggest that drying time is not only affected by hand size but perhaps other factors may be involved as well (e.g., skin temperature and degree of hydration). ABHR volumes of 3.5 ml or more were inefficient, as the disinfectant spilled while the additional rubbing time did not improve hand coverage.

Conclusions

Hand sizes differ a lot among HCWs. After objectively measuring participants, the surface of the smallest hand was just over half compared to the largest hand (259 cm2 and 498 cm2, respectively). While a 3 ml ABHR volume is reasonable for medium-size hands, the need for an optimized volume of hand rub for each individual is critical, as it offers several advantages. Not only it can ensure adequate hand hygiene quality, but also prevent unnecessary costs. Bluntly increasing the volume also increases spillage and therefore waste of disinfectant in the case of smaller hands. In addition, adherence could potentially decrease due to the required longer drying time, therefore, adjusting the dosage according to hand size may also increase the overall hand hygiene compliance.

To read this Abstract in its entirety please click on the link below to be redirected. Thank you.

https://aricjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13756-021-00917-8/

Toothbrush Hygiene


Toothbrush hygiene:
A 2012 study from Manchester University in England found that a toothbrush may house more than 10 million bacteria. To keep your toothbrush as germ-free as possible, rinse and air-dry it after each use, and, if you choose to store it in the bathroom, use a toothbrush cover, and close the toilet lid before you flush. It is also recommended not to store the toothbrush directly next to the toilet.

 

 

Researchers Find Infection Prevention Cleaning Compliance to Be More Effective In Reducing the Spread of C. diff.

Small changes in daily hygiene are more effective than visitor contact precautions in preventing C. difficile (C. diff.) among elderly patients in long-term care centers, according to a new study published in JAMA Network Open.

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Wisconsin, studied infection control regimens to deter C. diff transmission in a 200-bed acute care adult hospital. Visitor contract precautions (VCPs) are a common regimen, in which visitors don gowns and gloves when entering the room of a patient with a C. diff infection (CDI).

Implementing VCPs requires considerable worker and personal protective equipment (PPE) resources. In addition, VCPs are often associated with adverse effects for patients, as they limit the amount of visitors patients may see and often lead to increased delirium and depression.

After researchers accounted for factors such as patient susceptibility, behavior, and transmission, they found VCPs resulted in minimal change, contributing to a 1% or less decrease in infection rate.

Investigators seeking a better method of containing CDI looked at the effects of stressing health care worker’s hand hygiene, daily cleaning of patient rooms and common areas, as well as thorough terminal cleaning of rooms between patients. They determined that slightly increasing worker hand hygiene and environmental cleaning compliance— by no more than 2%— were associated with larger infection decreases.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source:  https://www.cmmonline.com/news/learn-how-the-cleaning-industry-can-help-with-updated-cdc-travel-guidelines

C. diff. Spores and More Live Broadcast Enters Season VI

Welcome to Season VI on 

C. diff. Spores and More

Live Broadcast, sponsored

by Clorox Healthcare.

 

With over 260 archived episodes ~ Listen At Your Leisure


It’s a new year with an entirely new line up of guests eager to share their C. difficile research, infection prevention methods, clinical trials in progress, the updates in the C. diff. community, and much more.

 

 

 

 

In March the post-Patient and Family Symposium presentations will broadcast, in the event you weren’t able to attend the live-online event hosted on January 15th. The first annual Patient and Family Symposium was sponsored by Seres Therapeutics

Do you have a specific topic of interest or would like to learn more about a specific product or procedure?  Send an email to info@cdifffoundation.org and share your suggestions and interests.

“None of us can do this alone ~ All of us can do this together.”

Join us every Tuesday at 1:00 p.m. EST for the Live Broadcast  www.cdiffradio.com