Tag Archives: C diff foundation

The C Diff Foundation Offers Patients, Family Members, and Clinicians Global Community Support

We are pleased to announce the

C. diff. Global Community Support Program —   an extension of  our

existing patient program – C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program.

Our Foundation Members and Medical Advocates, leading the support groups, via: teleconferencing, will now have the ability to offer support to patients, families, clinicians, and individuals seeking support —  in  the U.S. and 57 countries.

Below you will find the list of countries, with their local cities,  able
to participate in our teleconferencing support groups:

Argentina – Buenos Aires and Cordoba
Australia – Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney
Austria – Countrywide, Vienna
Bahrain – Countrywide
Belgium – Brussels
Brazil – Belo Horizonte, Curitiba, Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo
Bulgaria – Sofia
Canada – Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax, Hamilton, Montreal, Ottawa, Quebec City, Toronto,
Vancouver, Winnipeg.
Chile – Santiago
China – Beijing
Columbia – Bogota
Costa Rica – National VolP
Croatia – Zagreb
Cyprus – Nicosia
Czech Republic – Prague
Denmark – Countrywide
Dominican Republic – Santo Domingo
El Salvador – San Salvador
Finland – Helsinki
France – Marseille, Paris
Germany – Berlin, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Munich
Greece – Athens
Hong Kong – Countrywide
Hungary – Budapest
India – Bangalore, Delhi, Mumbai
Ireland – Dublin, National VolP
Israel – Jerusalem, Tel Aviv
Italy – Milan, Rome
Japan – Tokyo
Latvia- Riga
Lithuania – Vilnius
Luxembourg – Countrywide
Malaysia – Kuala Lumpur
Malta – Countrywide
Mexico – Guadalajara, Mexico City, Monterrey
Netherlands – Amsterdam
New Zealand – Auckland
Norway – Oslo
Panama – Panama City
Peru – Lima
Poland – Warsaw
Portugal – Countrywide
Puerto Rico – Aguadilla
Romania – Bucharest
Russia – Moscow
Singapore – Singapore
Slovakia – Bratislava
Slovenia – Ljubljana
South Africa – Cape Town, Johannesburg
South Korea – Seoul
Spain – Barcelona, Madrid
Sweden – Malmo, Stockholm
Switzerland – Bern, Geneva, Zurich
Turkey – Istanbul
Ukraine – National VolP
United Kingdom – Birmingham, Edinburgh, Leeds, Liverpool, London, Manchester, National.
Venezuela – Caracas

Registration will remain the same – through the main number (919) 201-1512
or utilizing the nationwide U.S. Hot-Line 1-844-FOR-CDIF, or from the Foundation website
http://www.cdifffoundation.org C. diff. Global Community Support page.

Support is only a phone call away worldwide

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Sweet Potato vs White Potato — Time To Make A Switch

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Besides simple starches, raw sweet potatoes are rich in complex carbohydrates, dietary fiber and beta-carotene (a provitamin A carotenoid), while having moderate contents of other micronutrients, including vitamin B5, vitamin B6 and manganese (table). When cooked by baking, small variable changes in micronutrient density occur to include a higher content of vitamin C at 24% of the Daily Value per 100 g serving (right table)]

The Center for Science in the Public Interest ranked the nutritional value of sweet potatoes as highest among several other foods.

Sweet potato varieties with dark orange flesh have more beta-carotene than those with light-colored flesh, and their increased cultivation is being encouraged in Africa where vitamin A deficiency is a serious health problem. A 2012 study of 10,000 households in Uganda found that children eating beta-carotene enriched sweet potatoes suffered less vitamin A deficiency than those not consuming as much beta-carotene. (1)

Benefits of Sweet Potato:

  • Sweet potato is one of the high calorie starch foods (provide 90 calories/100 g vis a vis to 70 calories/100 g in potato). The tuber, however, contains no saturated fats or cholesterol, and is rich source of dietary fiber, anti-oxidants, vitamins, and minerals than potatoes.
  • Its calorie content mainly comes from starch, a complex carbohydrate. Sweet potato has higher amylose to the amylopectin ratio than that in potato. Amylose raises the blood sugar levels rather slowly on comparison to simple fruit sugars (fructose, glucose etc) and therefore, recommended as a healthy food item even in diabetes.
  • The tuber is an excellent source of flavonoid phenolic compounds such as beta-carotene and vitamin-A. 100 g tuber provides 14,187 IU of vitamin A and 8,509 µg of ß-carotene, a value which is the highest for any root-vegetables categories. These compounds are powerful natural antioxidants. Vitamin A is also required for the human body to maintain integrity of mucus membranes and skin. It is a vital nutrient for healthy vision. Consumption of natural vegetables and fruits rich in flavonoids helps protect from lung and oral cavity cancers.
  • The total antioxidant strength of raw sweet potato measured in terms of oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) is 902 µmol TE/100 g.
  • The tubers are packed with many essential vitamins such as pantothenic acid (vitamin B-5), pyridoxine (vitamin B-6), and thiamin (vitamin B-1), niacin, and riboflavin. These vitamins are essential in the sense that the human body requires them from external sources to replenish. These vitamins function as co-factors for various enzymes during metabolism.
  • Sweet potato provides good amount of vital minerals such as iron, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and potassium that are very essential for enzyme, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism.
  • Sweet potato top greens are indeed more nutritious than the tuber itself. Weight per weight, 100 g of fresh leaves carry more iron, vitamin C, folates, vitamin K, and potassium but less sodium than its tuber.  (2)

Simple Baked Potato Recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 large sweet potatoes
  • 2 pinches salt

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Coat the bottom of a glass or non-stick baking dish with olive oil, just enough to coat.
  2. Wash and peel the sweet potatoes. Cut them into medium size pieces. Place the cut sweet potatoes in the baking dish and turn them so that they are coated with the olive oil. Sprinkle moderately with oregano, and salt and pepper (to taste).  The potatoes can also be mashed at this time for easier digestion.  (3)

 

Resource: 

(1)  Sweet Potato Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweet_potato

(2)  Sweet Potato Benefits:   http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/sweet_potato.html

(3)  Baked Sweet Potato Recipe:  Allrecipe.com :     http://allrecipes.com/recipe/18249/baked-sweet-potatoes/print/?recipeType=Recipe&servings=4

C. diff. Spores and More Returns To Live Broadcasting January 19th With Guests Dr. Caterina Oneto, MD and Dr. Paul Feuerstadt, MD

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HAPPY NEW YEAR!

C. diff. Spores and More ™”

returns to live broadcasting on

January 19th, 2016

 

 

 

Join us  at 10 a.m. Pacific Time, 11 a.m. Mountain Time, 12 p.m. Central Time,
and   1 p.m. Eastern Time.

with our two guests:

Dr. Caterina Oneto, MD  –  a Clinical Assistant Professor within the NYU Division of Gastroenterology, Board Certified in Gastroenterology and Internal Medicine. 

Fluent in Spanish, she graduated with a degree in Medicine and Surgery from the
Universidad de Valparaiso in Chile. She completed her residency in
Internal Medicine at Cabrini Medical Center, where she served also as Chief Resident, and later completed her Fellowship in Gastroenterology at Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. With expertise in endoscopy, colonoscopy, capsule endoscopy, liver and pancreatic diseases, Dr. Oneto’s special interests include IBD (Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative Colitis), IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), microbiota modification, treatment of Clostridium Difficile and FMT (Fecal Microbiota Transplantation).

AND

Dr. Paul Feuerstadt, MD – A native of Long Island, New York, Dr. Feuerstadt attended the University of Pennsylvania where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Biology, with distinction in research and graduated Summa Cum Laude. Following completion of his undergraduate training, Dr. Feuerstadt attended the Weill Medical College of Cornell University in Manhattan, New York where he earned his Medical Doctor degree and stayed at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell medical center for his internship and residency in Internal Medicine. Following completion of his residency Dr. Feuerstadt then moved on to the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, New York for his clinical fellowship training.

Throughout Dr. Feuerstadt’s training and practice he has been actively involved in research and other academic pursuits. His areas of interest include ischemic diseases of the gut and chronic diarrheal syndromes with a specific focus on Clostridium difficile infection. He has presented his research extensively at national meetings and has authored and co-authored many manuscripts and textbook chapters. Another passion of Dr. Feuerstadt’s is teaching, frequently mentoring the fellows in the Division of Digestive Disease at Yale-New Haven Hospital where he holds a clinical appointment as a Clinical Instructor of Medicine. His clinical practice is his ultimate passion filling the majority of his work time seeing a broad spectrum of patients with gastrointestinal and hepatic disease. Dr. Feuerstadt is affiliated with the
St. Raphael campus of Yale-New Haven Hospital, Yale-New Haven Hospital, and Milford Hospital seeing outpatients in his offices in Hamden and Milford, Connecticut.

* All “C. diff. Spores and More ™”   episodes and archived programs are available on demand by accessing the following link:

http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

Hard Facts: Deaths and illnesses are much higher than reports have shown. Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released today, February 25, 2015, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

• More than 100,000 of these infections developed among residents of U.S. nursing homes.

Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of a C. diff. infection. Of these 29,000 – 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly related to a
C. diff. infection. Therefore; C. diff. is an important cause of infectious disease death in the U.S.

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Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of Healthcare-Associated Infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone. Approximately
two-thirds of C. diff. infections were found to be associated with an inpatient stay in a health care facility, only 24% of the total cases occurred in patients while they were hospitalized. The study also revealed that almost as many cases occurred in nursing homes as in hospitals and the remainder of individuals acquired the
Healthcare-Associated infection, C. diff., recently discharged from a health care facility.

This new study finds that 1 out of every 5 patients with the Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI), C. diff., experience a recurrence of the infection and 1 out of every 9 patients over the age of 65 diagnosed with a HAI – C. diff. infection died within 30 days of being diagnosed. Older Americans are quite vulnerable to this life-threatening diarrhea infection. The CDC study also found that women and Caucasian individuals are at an increased risk of acquiring a C. diff. infection. The CDC Director, Dr. Tom Frieden, MD, MPH said, “C. difficile infections cause immense suffering and death for thousands of Americans each year.” “These infections can be prevented by improving antibiotic prescribing and by improving infection control in the health care system. CDC hopes to ramp up prevention of this deadly infection by supporting State Antibiotic Resistance Prevention Programs in all 50 states.”

“This does not include the number of C. diff. infections taking place and being treated in other countries.”  “The  C Diff Foundation supports hundreds of communities worldwide by sharing the Foundation’s mission and  raising C. diff. awareness with healthcare professionals, individuals, patients, families,  and communities working towards a shared goal ~  witnessing a reduction of newly diagnosed C. diff. cases by 2020 .”   ” The C Diff Foundation volunteer Advocates are greatly appreciated and continue to create positive changes by sharing their time  aiding in the success of our mission “Raising C. diff. awareness ™”  worldwide.

C. diff. Spores and More ™“ spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the
C. diff.
community and more.

Through their interviews, the C Diff Foundation mission will connect, educate, and empower many worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

Join us and listen in beginning January 19th, 2016  on Tuesdays  for educational episodes of                                       C. diff. Spores and More™”

View the programs and radio information by clicking on the link below:

www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

 

Programming for C. diff. Spores and More ™ is made possible through our official Corporate Sponsor;  Clorox Healthcare

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C. difficile Infection (CDI) C Diff Foundation Opens a New Avenue – C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program

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The C Diff Foundation introduces the  C. diff. Nationwide Community Support (CDNCS) program beginning in November  for patients, families, survivors and for anyone seeking information and support.

C. difficile (C. diff.) infections caused almost half a million infections among patients in the United States in a single year, according to a 2015 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In addition, an estimated 15,000 deaths are directly attributable to C. difficile infections, making them a substantial cause of infectious disease death in the United States. [i].

As of 2015, there is an absence of professional C. diff. (CDI) support groups in America. The          C Diff Foundation has pioneered a collaborative plan and developed support groups in a variety of availability and locations to meet the needs of individuals seeking C. diff. information and support.

“We found it to be of the utmost importance to implement this new pathway for support and healing after speaking with numerous patients, family members, and fellow-C. diff. survivors,”

We now speak for the thousands of patients within the United States who, each year, are diagnosed with a C. diff. infection. This growth, in part, reflects the value C. diff. support groups will provide, not only to patients, their spouses, and families who are living with and recovering from a C. diff. infection, but also to the countless number of individuals who will become more aware of a C. diff. infection, the importance of early detection, appropriate treatments, and environmental safety protocols. There will also be Bereavement support group sessions for   C. diff. survivors mourning the loss of loved ones following their death from C. diff. infection involvement.

Beginning November 2015 the CDNCS groups will be available to all individuals via: Teleconferencing with some groups advancing and adding computer application programs in 2016. CDNCS groups will provide support and information  to 15 participants in each session.

The CDNCS program sessions will be hosted via: Teleconferencing with leaders hosting from Maryland, Florida, Missouri, Colorado, Ohio, and Oregon.

The Colorado CDNCS group is offered at a public venue and will be hosted in Arvada, Colo. every third Tuesday of each month, beginning November 17th. The Meeting will start at 5:30 p.m. and end at 7 p.m lead by a C Diff Foundation Volunteer Advocate and C. diff. survivor          Mr. Roy Poole.

To participate in any CDNCS group being offered during each month, all interested participants will be asked to register through the Nationwide Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) or through the   website https://cdifffoundation.org/ where registered individuals will receive a reply e-mail containing support group access information.

  • The Support Registration Page  will be available on November 1st.

The C. diff. Nationwide Community Support group leaders will provide a menu of topics being shared each month on the C Diff Foundation’s website ranging from Financial Crisis Relief, Bereavement, Nutrition, Mental Health, to C. diff. infection updates and everyday life during and after being treated for a prolonged illness. Teleconference sessions will also host healthcare professional topic experts

There is evidence that people who attend support group meetings have a better understanding of the illness and their treatment choices. They also tend to experience less anxiety, develop a more positive outlook, and a better ability to cope and adapt to life during and after the treatment for C. diff.

There is a Purpose:

A diagnosis of a C. diff. infection is unexpected and almost always traumatic. As a result, it is not uncommon for newly diagnosed patients to experience a wide range of emotions including, confusion, bewilderment, anger, fear, panic, and denial. Many people find that just having an opportunity to talk with another person, who has experienced the same situation, to help alleviate some of the anxiety and distress they commonly experience.

Individuals also find that they benefit not only from the support they receive, but also from the sense of well-being they gain from helping others. It has been said “support is not something you do for others but rather something you do with others.”

“None of us can do this alone – all of us can do this together.”

 

Follow the C Diff Foundation on Twitter @cdiffFoundation #cdiff2015 and                                        Facebook https://www.facebook.com/CdiffFoundationRadio.

Note/citation: [i] http://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/biggest_threats.html

World Health Organization (WHO) World Antibiotic Awareness Week November 16-22

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The first World Antibiotic Awareness Week will be held from 16 to 22 November 2015. The campaign aims to increase awareness of global antibiotic resistance and to encourage best practices among the general public, health workers and policy makers to avoid the further emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance.

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Dr. Sadeq A. Quraishi, MD

Sadeqpic (2)We are pleased to welcome Dr. Sadeq A. Quraishi, MD  joining the      C Diff Foundation’s Medical Advisory Board.

Sadeq A. Quraishi, MD, MHA, MMSc is an anesthesiologist/intensive care physician in the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA. He is also Assistant Professor of Anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA. Dr. Quraishi’s overall research goal is to better define how macro- and micro-nutrient status influence outcomes during acute stress and critical illness. In particular, his research group has focused on the immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D in the perioperative setting, during acute care hospitalization, and for patients in the intensive care unit. Recently, Dr. Quraishi’s group has identified vitamin D status as a potentially modifiable risk factor for hospital acquired C. diff infections and that the severity of C. Diff infections may also be related to vitamin D status. Other areas of research that Dr. Quraishi is involved with include novel strategies to maintain lean body mass and the design of innovative feeding protocols to minimize caloric/protein debt in hospitalized patients.

Stop the Spread of Antibiotic Resistance and C. difficile Infections

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Antibiotic-resistant germs cause more than 2 million illnesses and at least 23,000 deaths each year in the US.

Up to 70% fewer patients will get CRE over 5 years if facilities coordinate to protect patients.

Preventing infections and improving antibiotic prescribing could save 37,000 lives from drug-resistant infections over 5 years.

Problem:  Germs spread between patients and across health care facilities.

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Antibiotic resistance is a threat.

 

  • Nightmare germs called CRE (carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae) can cause deadly infections and have become resistant to all or nearly all antibiotics we have today. CRE spread between health care facilities like hospitals and nursing homes when appropriate actions are not taken.
  • MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) infections commonly cause pneumonia and sepsis that can be deadly.
  • The germ Pseudomonas aeruginosa can cause HAIs, including bloodstream infections. Strains resistant to almost all antibiotics have been found in hospitalized patients.
  • These germs are some of the most deadly resistant germs identified as “urgent” and “serious” threats.
C. difficile infections are at historically high rates.
  • C. difficile (Clostridium difficile), a germ commonly found in health care facilities, can be picked up from contaminated surfaces or spread from a healthcare provider’s hands.
  • Most C. difficile is not resistant to antibiotics, but when a person takes antibiotics, some good germs are destroyed. Antibiotic use allows C. difficile to take over, putting patients at high risk for deadly diarrhea.
Working together is vital.
  • Infections and antibiotic use in one facility affect other facilities because of patient transfers.
  • Public health leadership is critical so that facilities are alerted to data about resistant infections, C. difficile, or outbreaks in the area, and can target effective prevention strategies.
  • When facilities are alerted to increased threat levels, they can improve antibiotic use and infection control actions so that patients are better protected.
  • National efforts to prevent infections and improve antibiotic prescribing could prevent 619,000 antibiotic-resistant and C. difficile infections over 5 years.

 

  • “Patients and their families may wonder how they can help stop the spread of infections,” says Michael Bell, M.D., deputy director of CDC’s Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion. “When receiving health care, tell your doctor if you have been hospitalized in another facility or country, wash your hands often, and always insist that everyone have clean hands before touching you.”

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Antibiotic-resistant germs, those that no longer respond to the drugs designed to kill them, cause more than 2 million illnesses and at least 23,000 deaths each year in the United States. C. difficile caused close to half a million illnesses in 2011, and an estimated 15,000 deaths a year are directly attributable to C. difficile infections.

 The report recommends the following coordinated, two-part approach to turn this data into action that prevents illness and saves lives:

  1. Public health departments track and alert health care facilities to drug-resistant germ outbreaks in their area and the threat of germs coming from other facilities, and
  2. Health care facilities work together and with public health authorities to implement shared infection control actions to stop the spread of antibiotic-resistant germs and C. difficile between facilities.

“Antibiotic resistant infections in health care settings are a growing threat in the United States, killing thousands and thousands of people each year,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “We can dramatically reduce these infections if health care facilities, nursing homes, and public health departments work together to improve antibiotic use and infection control so patients are protected.”

The promising news is that CDC modeling projects that a coordinated approach—that is, health care facilities and health departments in an area working together—could prevent up to 70 percent of life-threatening carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) infections over five years. Additional estimates show that national infection control and antibiotic stewardship efforts led by federal agencies, health care facilities, and public health departments could prevent 619,000 antibiotic-resistant and C. difficile infections and save 37,000 lives over five years.

During the next five years, with investments, CDC’s efforts to combat C. difficile infections and antibiotic resistance under the National Strategy to Combat Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, in collaboration with other federal partners, will enhance national capabilities for antibiotic stewardship, outbreak surveillance, and antibiotic resistance prevention. These efforts hold the potential to cut the incidence of C. difficile, health care CRE, and MRSA bloodstream infections by at least half.

The proposed State Antibiotic Resistance Prevention Programs (Protect Programs) would implement this coordinated approach. These Protect Programs would be made possible by the funding proposed in the President’s FY 2016 budget request, supporting work with health care facilities in all 50 states to detect and prevent both antibiotic-resistant germs and C. difficile infections. The FY 2016 budget would also accelerate efforts to improve antibiotic stewardship in health care facilities.