Tag Archives: cdiff support

C. difficile Infection (C. diff.); A Survivor’s Perspective with CDI Introduction by Teena Chopra, MD,MPH,FACP,FIDSA,FSHEA

Join us on Tuesday, May 26th at 1:00 p.m. EST

C. diff. Spores and More Live Broadcast

www.cdiffradio.com

With Doctor Teena Chopra, MD,MPH,FACP,FIDSA,FSHEA
Associate Professor of Medicine,Division of Infectious Diseases,
Corporate Medical Director,Infection Prevention,Epidemiology,and Antibiotic Stewardship ,DMC and WSU Director,Infection Prevention,Epidemiology and Antibiotic Stewardship,Vibra Hospital

Dr. Chopra will lead the discussion with an overview of a C. difficile infection followed by Alba Muhlfeld, and Renata Johnson, C. diff. Survivors both sharing their journey and providing
key-points to our global listeners.

Unable to listen to the live broadcast?

Access the C. diff. Spores and More Library
http://www.cdiffradio.com
and listen at your leisure.

 

 

C. diff. Spores and More is sponsored by

Monday, April 27th – 6:00 p.m. EST Leading Gastroenterologist’s Caterina Oneto, MD & Paul Feuerstadt, MD Host C. diff. Global TeleSupport Network

MONDAY,  April 27th   –  6:00 p.m. EST
Hosts and Co-Directors

Doctors Caterina Oneto, MD &
Paul Feuerstadt, MD

 

Topic:  Doctors Oneto and Feuerstadt will discuss C. difficile Infections; The What, Where and How.  There will be opportunities to ask a  brief question to the physicians.  We appreciate Dr.’s Oneto and Dr. Feuerstadt for donating their time to discuss C. difficile Infections and to provide information regarding prevention, treatments available, and environmental safety products available.   Join Dr. Oneto and Dr. Feuerstadt’s session hosted on the fourth Monday of each month.
Via: Teleconference Call:  1 – 646 -927 – 0297   Conference ID:  123560#
3:00 p.m. PT     4:00 p.m. MT     5:00 p.m. CT    6:00 p.m ET

NOTE:  The Physicians will not prescribe, diagnose, or provide medical assessment answers to any individuals participating in their support session.  Please contact the Physician providing care for a C. diff. Infection or other diagnoses that are being treated.    Thank you.

 

SUPPORT IS JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY ♥

Support and information sessions are for everyone especially for —

  • Families.
  • Clinicians,
  • C. diff. survivors continuing their recovery from a prolonged illness.
  • Patients working their way through any long-term wellness draining diagnosis.

All Sessions are FREE and accessible from the USA and 57 countries  *

Support is available to anyone seeking additional information with the desire to speak with others that understand the journey.

  • PLEASE NOTE *  If you, or anyone you know, are experiencing mental or physical symptoms causing pain, fever, discomfort, C. difficile symptoms or changes in a diagnosed infection, or a change in emotional behavior or having suicidal thoughts, DO NOT wait for a scheduled support session.  Contact a physician or seek medical attention at a local clinic or hospital immediately. Thank you.

The C. diff. Global TeleSupport Network program is the first-ever FREE GLOBAL patient and family educational support program developed by a U.S. non-profit 501(c)(3) — The C Diff Foundation is dedicated to educating and advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, clinical trials, support, and environmental safety worldwide.

C. diff. Global TeleSupport Network Accessible From USA and 57 Countries

WELCOME

Where SUPPORT IS JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY ♥

Support and information sessions are for everyone especially for —

  • Families.
  • Clinicians,
  • C. diff. survivors continuing their recovery from a prolonged illness.
  • Patients working their way through any long-term wellness draining diagnosis.

All Sessions are FREE and accessible from the USA and 57 countries  *

Support is available for anyone seeking additional information with the desire to speak with others that understand the journey.

  • PLEASE NOTE *  If you, or anyone you know, are experiencing mental or physical symptoms causing pain, fever, discomfort, C. difficile symptoms or changes in a diagnosed infection, or a change in emotional behavior or having suicidal thoughts, DO NOT wait for a scheduled support session.  Contact a physician or seek medical attention at a local clinic or hospital immediately. Thank you.

The C. diff. Global TeleSupport Network program is the first-ever FREE GLOBAL patient and family educational support program developed by a U.S. non-profit 501(c)(3) — The C Diff Foundation is dedicated to educating and advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, clinical trials, support, and environmental safety worldwide.

How Does the Program Work?

(please check with your telephone carrier for calling program prior to connecting to the teleconference number provided. Verify with local phone and mobile phone carriers for long-distance fees if applicable. The C Diff Foundation does not cover expenses for long-distance fees if incurred).

  • This program is easy and convenient for everyone, especially to individuals unable to travel distances to gain support and information to improve their own health and gain knowledge of how to increase wellness.
  • Support sessions are accessed by dialing a designated telephone number provided by an email at the time of registration.
  •  Conference ID Number will also be provided and this six-digit number needs to be entered by the caller after connecting to the support conference in session.

The discussions are delivered by topic expert healthcare providers and
C. difficile infection survivors who are able to share validated and accurate information with the general public.  Each session also provides an opportunity for general topic questions and answers 1:1

*Please Note:  The Physicians, and support leaders, will not prescribe, diagnose, or provide personal medical assessment information to any individuals participating in their support session. The information provided in each support session is based on the topic being presented and in a general informational basis.  Please contact the Physician providing care for a  C. diff. Infection or any healthcare diagnosis being treated for a personal diagnostic healthcare discussion.

The telephone sessions are available across the USA and accessible in 57 countries.

Register today to gain information

  • Nutrition Counseling.
  • Mental Health Topics.
  • The Who – What – Where of a C. difficile infection,
  • Discussions on how to maintain environmental safety in a home setting,
  • General wellness information, and more.

Visit    https://cdifffoundation.org/cdiffglobalsupport/

to sign up for a free support session today.

 

 

TeleSupport Program Established 2016

Food For Thought, An Overview Of a Low FODMAP Diet and the Importance Of a Registered Dietitian

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The FODMAP Diet is being discussed at greater lengths with patients experiencing gastrointestinal (GI)  challenges and alterations with their GI systems.

 

There is not a specific “C. diff. Diet,” as Clostridium difficile is an infection, however; we know and understand that the G.I. system is quite effected by this infection causing a disruption in normal dietary intake and difficulties maintaining adequate hydration and nutrition on a daily basis.

This brings us to the Low FODMAP Diet. What is it? What does FODMAP stand for? Can it benefit patients diagnosed with C.diff. ? All good questions and this is yet one more topic patients can discuss with their healthcare providers providing their care and with a Registered Dietician with a solid background in Gastroenterology and utilizing the FODMAP diet plan with patients.

FODMAP is an acronym for:
Fermentable (produces gas in the intestines)
Oligosaccharides (fructans and galactans/GOS)
Disaccharides (lactose)
Monosaccharides (excess fructose)
And
Polyols (sugar alcohols such as sorbitol, maltitol, mannitol, xylitol, and isomalt)

FODMAP’s are sugars – the carbohydrates – in foods eaten and are poorly absorbed by the GI system.  The intestinal bacteria in the gut can react negatively to these types of foods and cause abdominal bloating, accompanied by gas,  developing pain and even diarrhea and/or constipation.

When foods high in FODMAP are eliminated from the daily diet of patients diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), patients begin to witness a decline in the negative GI (gastrointestinal) symptoms.  By reducing the intake of FODMAP foods may also help reduce GI symptoms for patients diagnosed with Crohn’s, Ulcerative Colitis (UC) or Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

  • Please Note:  Before changing diets, always speak to the healthcare professional/s monitoring and treating any/all gastrointestinal symptoms.

What foods contain FODMAP’s ?

Here is a partial listing of food high in FODMAP:

  • Fructans and Galactans/GOS:  Wheat, Rye, Barley, Onion, Garlic, Inulin/Chicory root, Most Legumes (bean sources), Artichoke, Soy Milk, Rice Milk, Coconut Milk.
  • Lactose:  Milk, Yogurt, Ice Cream, Soft Cheeses such as Ricotta and Cottage Cheese.
  • Fructose: A major ingredient in many processed foods is High Fructose Corn Syrup, Honey, Agave, and Fruits such as Applies, Pears, and Watermelon.
  • Polyols:  Mushrooms, Cauliflower, Sugar-Free Gum and Candy, and a few fruits such as Peaches, Plums, and Cherries.

Here is a partial listing of foods that are allowed when following a FODMAP Diet:

  • Grains:  Rice, Oats, Gluten-Free Pasta, Breads, and Cereals.
  • Fruites: Oranges, Bananas, Grapes, Honeydew Melon, Cantaloupe Melon, Kiwi, Pineapple and Berries except blackberries.
  • Vegetables:  Carrots, Eggplant, Zucchini, Peppers, Green Beans, Lettuce, Cucumber, Potato, and Tomatoes to name a few.
  • Protein:  Chicken, Turkey, Fish, Eggs, Beef, Pork, Tofu, Nut Butters.
  • Dairy: Lactose FREE Milk products, If there is not a nut allergy then proceed to Nut Milks such as Almond and Cashew Milk, Lactose Free Yogurt, Hard Cheese like Chedder and Feta.

fodmap

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Registered Dietitians (RD) with expertise and familiar with this diet help patients live better with any gastrointestinal diagnosis successfully.

Please note: This diet is a two step diet and consists of the elimination process and then the reintroduction of foods back into the diet.

The support and guidance gained by patients working directly with a RD will find this diet less restricting and experience the alleviation of negative symptoms caused by many food items.

The role of a RD is to guide patients and their families to eating nutritious foods and to assist in creating healthy, enjoyable meals that will promote a healthy GI system and reduce the symptoms.

To learn more about Registered Dietitians please take a moment to click on the link below to view a short video and gain a better understanding of the important role a RD provides in promoting well being and improving patient care in the healthcare system.

https://cdifffoundation.org/2013/07/18/what-a-registered-dietitian-can-do-for-you/

Karen Factor, RD is the Chairperson of Nutrition and Wellness Committee
of the C Diff Foundation and is available through the  C.diff. Support Sessions offered each month.  Register for a FREE support session with Karen by clicking on the following link:

https://cdifffoundation.org/cdiffsupport/

 

 

Resources: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Highlights Of the Latest Advances In the Battle Against the Deadly Pathogen – Dale Gerding, MD

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TO READ THIS ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY AS PUBLISHED IN THE MD MAGAZINE — PLEASE CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINK TO BE REDIRECTED:

 

http://www.mdmag.com/medical-news/c-diff-foundation-highlights-latest-advances-in-the-battle-against-the-deadly-pathogen

In September, researchers, health care workers, and industry and patient advocates convened for the 4th Annual International Raising C. diff Awareness Conference and Health Expo in Atlanta.

Clifford McDonald, MD, Associate Director for Science in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), chaired the conference. In his role at the CDC, McDonald’s at the forefront of efforts to prevent and treat the infection – one the CDC has declared among the most urgent drug-resistant threats that we currently face.

“It’s my firm belief that we are on the threshold of a new era in better diagnosis, treatment, and prevention approaches. At the CDC, we deal with statistics, but there are faces behind those numbers. At the heart of every infection is a patient who deserves our competence, our empathy, and our passion,” said McDonald.

One of those faces, Roy Poole, is a volunteer patient advocate for the  C Diff Foundation. After retiring from a career in the Air Force, Poole led a healthy, active lifestyle as an avid outdoors-man in Colorado before antibiotics prescribed for a routine dental procedure set the stage for CDI. In the medical community, his symptoms were met with disbelief and inappropriate treatment.

“Three weeks after leaving the hospital, I walked into my (previous) primary care physician, and asked for an order to have a stool sample taken to determine if Toxins A or B were present. His response was, ‘Are you still having problems with that?’ Clearly, there is a need for more education about C. diff among physicians,” said Poole.

CDI is a formidable opponent. However, with the newly focused attention on discovering ways to disable the bacteria and cohesive public health approaches aimed at prevention, presenters from government, academia and industry offered five key reasons we can win the battle against C. diff:

Antibiotic stewardship efforts are gaining a foothold.
Statistics present a chilling picture: 453,000 new cases and an estimated 30,000 deaths each year. It’s likely that those numbers grossly underestimate the true impact of CDI, since it’s what we know from death certificate reporting.

However, we are seeing that rates may have peaked after a long plateau. Mark Wilcox, MD, Head of Microbiology at Leeds Teaching Hospital, Professor of Medical Microbiology at University of Leeds, and the lead on Clostridium difficile for Public Health England in the United Kingdom, has demonstrated a 70% reduction in cases in England in just 7 years. This was after a concerted effort that Wilcox spearheaded surrounding antibiotic stewardship, specifically addressing a reduction in unnecessary prescribing of fluoroquinolones and cephalosporin antibiotics.

Commonly prescribed antibiotics disrupt the protective microbiota (the normal bacteria of the gut) and leave it vulnerable for C. diff colonization. “There was a concerted effort that went beyond lip service and truly embraced the principles of improved surveillance, more accurate diagnostics, enhanced infection prevention measures to use antibiotics more wisely and to limit transmission and careful treatment,” said Wilcox.

High rates of CDI are always associated with the use of certain antibiotics: clindamycin, cephalosporin, and fluoroquinolones. Research has shown that lower respiratory tract infections and urinary tract infections account for more than 50% of all in-patient antibiotics use. But are these really necessary?

“We know that antibiotics are overused and misused across every healthcare setting. At least 30% of antibiotic prescriptions are unnecessary – and this equates to 47 million unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions per year written in doctors’ offices, hospital outpatient departments, and emergency departments. We have a lot of work to do, and CDC is actively working to reduce unnecessary antibiotic use,” said Arjun Srinivasan, MD at the CDC. “Stopping unnecessary antibiotics is the single most effective thing we can do to curb C. diff infections in the United States. This is something that we can do today.”

Srinivasan acknowledged that telling patients that they can’t have a prescription for an antibiotic might result in some pushback. “Patient satisfaction scores are a very real concern. When someone is sick and takes a day off work, they’re not leaving without a prescription – especially when the last provider wrote one for their same symptoms,” he said. “But this is a new day, and it’s up to the physician to educate their patients and stay strong.”

Hospitalists have access to accurate, inexpensive and quick diagnostic tests that can lead to targeted, effective treatment. This can arm the treating physician and patient with information that can put patients on a path to recovery without feeling like they are being dismissed.

Emerging guidance reflects important advances in research and development.

Most recently published in 2010, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Clinical Practice Guidelines for C. diff are currently under review. This is critical because of the number of physicians still treating with metronidazole first, despite the fact that the largest randomized controlled clinical trial has shown that vancomycin is more effective.

“Since 2010, the landscape has changed dramatically,” said Stuart B. Johnson, MD, Professor, Department of Medicine, Loyola University, and Researcher at the Hines VA Hospital in Chicago.

“The past few years have ushered in a new age of understanding how and where C. diff colonizes, and the damaging toxins A and B that it produces.”

Considering that 25-30% of patients experience a CDI recurrence, it’s evident that metronidazole unnecessarily contributes to the failed treatment outcomes for patients. Metronidazole is less expensive, but has more side effects than oral vancomycin and is less effective in treating CDI.

Johnson provided an overview of the dramatic advances this space has seen in just the past few years.

Limitations of current guidelines include:
•       No mention of fidaxomicin, a narrow-spectrum antibiotic, which in 2011 was the first medication approved in 25 years for the treatment of C. diff associated diarrhea
•       Limited evidence for recommendations to treat severe, complicated CDI
•       Limited evidence for recommendations on recurrent CDI
•       Little mention of Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT)

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5.  Patient advocacy and awareness efforts can alter the course of CDI.
CDI survivors shared their experiences along their emotional journey – fear, disbelief, isolation, and depression. They also expressed gratitude at the validation, information and support they received from the patient advocacy community. Perhaps the greatest gift they have received is the empowerment to question their physicians about the necessity of antibiotics they have been prescribed in terms of risk of CDI.

“The hospital where I was treated initially seemed eager to have me leave. They offered no additional help. The C diff Foundation has been my greatest source of help. In turn, I feel I help myself cope best, when I help others to cope with the disease,” said Poole.

TO READ THIS ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY AS PUBLISHED IN THE MD MAGAZINE 

PLEASE CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINK TO BE REDIRECTED —- THANK YOU

http://www.mdmag.com/medical-news/c-diff-foundation-highlights-latest-advances-in-the-battle-against-the-deadly-pathogen

 

Dale Gerding, MD, FACP, FIDSA, is Professor of Medicine at Loyola University Chicago, Research Physician at the Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital. Additionally, Gerding is an infectious disease specialist and hospital epidemiologist, past president of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and past chair of the antibiotic resistance committee of SHEA. He is a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and past chair of the National and Global Public Health Committee and the Antibiotic Resistance Subcommittee of IDSA. His research interests include the epidemiology and prevention of Clostridium difficile, antimicrobial resistance, and antimicrobial distribution and kinetics.

The paper, “Burden of Clostridium difficile Infection in the United States,” was published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The study, “Changing epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection following the intriduction of a national ribotyping-based surveillance scheme in England,” was published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.

The study, “Prevalence of antimicrobial use in US acute care hospitals,” was published in JAMA.

The paper, “Vancomycin, metronidazole, or toleyamer for Clostridium difficile infection: results from two multinaionalm randomized, controlled trials,” was published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

The study, “A Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial of Saccharomyces boulardii in Combination with Standard Antibiotics for Clostridium difficile disease,” was published in JAMA.