Tag Archives: cdiff support

Food For Thought, An Overview Of a Low FODMAP Diet and the Importance Of a Registered Dietitian

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The FODMAP Diet is being discussed at greater lengths with patients experiencing gastrointestinal (GI)  challenges and alterations with their GI systems.

 

There is not a specific “C. diff. Diet,” as Clostridium difficile is an infection, however; we know and understand that the G.I. system is quite effected by this infection causing a disruption in normal dietary intake and difficulties maintaining adequate hydration and nutrition on a daily basis.

This brings us to the Low FODMAP Diet. What is it? What does FODMAP stand for? Can it benefit patients diagnosed with C.diff. ? All good questions and this is yet one more topic patients can discuss with their healthcare providers providing their care and with a Registered Dietician with a solid background in Gastroenterology and utilizing the FODMAP diet plan with patients.

FODMAP is an acronym for:
Fermentable (produces gas in the intestines)
Oligosaccharides (fructans and galactans/GOS)
Disaccharides (lactose)
Monosaccharides (excess fructose)
And
Polyols (sugar alcohols such as sorbitol, maltitol, mannitol, xylitol, and isomalt)

FODMAP’s are sugars – the carbohydrates – in foods eaten and are poorly absorbed by the GI system.  The intestinal bacteria in the gut can react negatively to these types of foods and cause abdominal bloating, accompanied by gas,  developing pain and even diarrhea and/or constipation.

When foods high in FODMAP are eliminated from the daily diet of patients diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), patients begin to witness a decline in the negative GI (gastrointestinal) symptoms.  By reducing the intake of FODMAP foods may also help reduce GI symptoms for patients diagnosed with Crohn’s, Ulcerative Colitis (UC) or Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

  • Please Note:  Before changing diets, always speak to the healthcare professional/s monitoring and treating any/all gastrointestinal symptoms.

What foods contain FODMAP’s ?

Here is a partial listing of food high in FODMAP:

  • Fructans and Galactans/GOS:  Wheat, Rye, Barley, Onion, Garlic, Inulin/Chicory root, Most Legumes (bean sources), Artichoke, Soy Milk, Rice Milk, Coconut Milk.
  • Lactose:  Milk, Yogurt, Ice Cream, Soft Cheeses such as Ricotta and Cottage Cheese.
  • Fructose: A major ingredient in many processed foods is High Fructose Corn Syrup, Honey, Agave, and Fruits such as Applies, Pears, and Watermelon.
  • Polyols:  Mushrooms, Cauliflower, Sugar-Free Gum and Candy, and a few fruits such as Peaches, Plums, and Cherries.

Here is a partial listing of foods that are allowed when following a FODMAP Diet:

  • Grains:  Rice, Oats, Gluten-Free Pasta, Breads, and Cereals.
  • Fruites: Oranges, Bananas, Grapes, Honeydew Melon, Cantaloupe Melon, Kiwi, Pineapple and Berries except blackberries.
  • Vegetables:  Carrots, Eggplant, Zucchini, Peppers, Green Beans, Lettuce, Cucumber, Potato, and Tomatoes to name a few.
  • Protein:  Chicken, Turkey, Fish, Eggs, Beef, Pork, Tofu, Nut Butters.
  • Dairy: Lactose FREE Milk products, If there is not a nut allergy then proceed to Nut Milks such as Almond and Cashew Milk, Lactose Free Yogurt, Hard Cheese like Chedder and Feta.

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Registered Dietitians (RD) with expertise and familiar with this diet help patients live better with any gastrointestinal diagnosis successfully.

Please note: This diet is a two step diet and consists of the elimination process and then the reintroduction of foods back into the diet.

The support and guidance gained by patients working directly with a RD will find this diet less restricting and experience the alleviation of negative symptoms caused by many food items.

The role of a RD is to guide patients and their families to eating nutritious foods and to assist in creating healthy, enjoyable meals that will promote a healthy GI system and reduce the symptoms.

To learn more about Registered Dietitians please take a moment to click on the link below to view a short video and gain a better understanding of the important role a RD provides in promoting well being and improving patient care in the healthcare system.

https://cdifffoundation.org/2013/07/18/what-a-registered-dietitian-can-do-for-you/

Karen Factor, RD is the Chairperson of Nutrition and Wellness Committee
of the C Diff Foundation and is available through the  C.diff. Support Sessions offered each month.  Register for a FREE support session with Karen by clicking on the following link:

https://cdifffoundation.org/cdiffsupport/

 

 

Resources: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Highlights Of the Latest Advances In the Battle Against the Deadly Pathogen – Dale Gerding, MD

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TO READ THIS ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY AS PUBLISHED IN THE MD MAGAZINE — PLEASE CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINK TO BE REDIRECTED:

 

http://www.mdmag.com/medical-news/c-diff-foundation-highlights-latest-advances-in-the-battle-against-the-deadly-pathogen

In September, researchers, health care workers, and industry and patient advocates convened for the 4th Annual International Raising C. diff Awareness Conference and Health Expo in Atlanta.

Clifford McDonald, MD, Associate Director for Science in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), chaired the conference. In his role at the CDC, McDonald’s at the forefront of efforts to prevent and treat the infection – one the CDC has declared among the most urgent drug-resistant threats that we currently face.

“It’s my firm belief that we are on the threshold of a new era in better diagnosis, treatment, and prevention approaches. At the CDC, we deal with statistics, but there are faces behind those numbers. At the heart of every infection is a patient who deserves our competence, our empathy, and our passion,” said McDonald.

One of those faces, Roy Poole, is a volunteer patient advocate for the  C Diff Foundation. After retiring from a career in the Air Force, Poole led a healthy, active lifestyle as an avid outdoors-man in Colorado before antibiotics prescribed for a routine dental procedure set the stage for CDI. In the medical community, his symptoms were met with disbelief and inappropriate treatment.

“Three weeks after leaving the hospital, I walked into my (previous) primary care physician, and asked for an order to have a stool sample taken to determine if Toxins A or B were present. His response was, ‘Are you still having problems with that?’ Clearly, there is a need for more education about C. diff among physicians,” said Poole.

CDI is a formidable opponent. However, with the newly focused attention on discovering ways to disable the bacteria and cohesive public health approaches aimed at prevention, presenters from government, academia and industry offered five key reasons we can win the battle against C. diff:

Antibiotic stewardship efforts are gaining a foothold.
Statistics present a chilling picture: 453,000 new cases and an estimated 30,000 deaths each year. It’s likely that those numbers grossly underestimate the true impact of CDI, since it’s what we know from death certificate reporting.

However, we are seeing that rates may have peaked after a long plateau. Mark Wilcox, MD, Head of Microbiology at Leeds Teaching Hospital, Professor of Medical Microbiology at University of Leeds, and the lead on Clostridium difficile for Public Health England in the United Kingdom, has demonstrated a 70% reduction in cases in England in just 7 years. This was after a concerted effort that Wilcox spearheaded surrounding antibiotic stewardship, specifically addressing a reduction in unnecessary prescribing of fluoroquinolones and cephalosporin antibiotics.

Commonly prescribed antibiotics disrupt the protective microbiota (the normal bacteria of the gut) and leave it vulnerable for C. diff colonization. “There was a concerted effort that went beyond lip service and truly embraced the principles of improved surveillance, more accurate diagnostics, enhanced infection prevention measures to use antibiotics more wisely and to limit transmission and careful treatment,” said Wilcox.

High rates of CDI are always associated with the use of certain antibiotics: clindamycin, cephalosporin, and fluoroquinolones. Research has shown that lower respiratory tract infections and urinary tract infections account for more than 50% of all in-patient antibiotics use. But are these really necessary?

“We know that antibiotics are overused and misused across every healthcare setting. At least 30% of antibiotic prescriptions are unnecessary – and this equates to 47 million unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions per year written in doctors’ offices, hospital outpatient departments, and emergency departments. We have a lot of work to do, and CDC is actively working to reduce unnecessary antibiotic use,” said Arjun Srinivasan, MD at the CDC. “Stopping unnecessary antibiotics is the single most effective thing we can do to curb C. diff infections in the United States. This is something that we can do today.”

Srinivasan acknowledged that telling patients that they can’t have a prescription for an antibiotic might result in some pushback. “Patient satisfaction scores are a very real concern. When someone is sick and takes a day off work, they’re not leaving without a prescription – especially when the last provider wrote one for their same symptoms,” he said. “But this is a new day, and it’s up to the physician to educate their patients and stay strong.”

Hospitalists have access to accurate, inexpensive and quick diagnostic tests that can lead to targeted, effective treatment. This can arm the treating physician and patient with information that can put patients on a path to recovery without feeling like they are being dismissed.

Emerging guidance reflects important advances in research and development.

Most recently published in 2010, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Clinical Practice Guidelines for C. diff are currently under review. This is critical because of the number of physicians still treating with metronidazole first, despite the fact that the largest randomized controlled clinical trial has shown that vancomycin is more effective.

“Since 2010, the landscape has changed dramatically,” said Stuart B. Johnson, MD, Professor, Department of Medicine, Loyola University, and Researcher at the Hines VA Hospital in Chicago.

“The past few years have ushered in a new age of understanding how and where C. diff colonizes, and the damaging toxins A and B that it produces.”

Considering that 25-30% of patients experience a CDI recurrence, it’s evident that metronidazole unnecessarily contributes to the failed treatment outcomes for patients. Metronidazole is less expensive, but has more side effects than oral vancomycin and is less effective in treating CDI.

Johnson provided an overview of the dramatic advances this space has seen in just the past few years.

Limitations of current guidelines include:
•       No mention of fidaxomicin, a narrow-spectrum antibiotic, which in 2011 was the first medication approved in 25 years for the treatment of C. diff associated diarrhea
•       Limited evidence for recommendations to treat severe, complicated CDI
•       Limited evidence for recommendations on recurrent CDI
•       Little mention of Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT)

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5.  Patient advocacy and awareness efforts can alter the course of CDI.
CDI survivors shared their experiences along their emotional journey – fear, disbelief, isolation, and depression. They also expressed gratitude at the validation, information and support they received from the patient advocacy community. Perhaps the greatest gift they have received is the empowerment to question their physicians about the necessity of antibiotics they have been prescribed in terms of risk of CDI.

“The hospital where I was treated initially seemed eager to have me leave. They offered no additional help. The C diff Foundation has been my greatest source of help. In turn, I feel I help myself cope best, when I help others to cope with the disease,” said Poole.

TO READ THIS ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY AS PUBLISHED IN THE MD MAGAZINE 

PLEASE CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINK TO BE REDIRECTED —- THANK YOU

http://www.mdmag.com/medical-news/c-diff-foundation-highlights-latest-advances-in-the-battle-against-the-deadly-pathogen

 

Dale Gerding, MD, FACP, FIDSA, is Professor of Medicine at Loyola University Chicago, Research Physician at the Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital. Additionally, Gerding is an infectious disease specialist and hospital epidemiologist, past president of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and past chair of the antibiotic resistance committee of SHEA. He is a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and past chair of the National and Global Public Health Committee and the Antibiotic Resistance Subcommittee of IDSA. His research interests include the epidemiology and prevention of Clostridium difficile, antimicrobial resistance, and antimicrobial distribution and kinetics.

The paper, “Burden of Clostridium difficile Infection in the United States,” was published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The study, “Changing epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection following the intriduction of a national ribotyping-based surveillance scheme in England,” was published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.

The study, “Prevalence of antimicrobial use in US acute care hospitals,” was published in JAMA.

The paper, “Vancomycin, metronidazole, or toleyamer for Clostridium difficile infection: results from two multinaionalm randomized, controlled trials,” was published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

The study, “A Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial of Saccharomyces boulardii in Combination with Standard Antibiotics for Clostridium difficile disease,” was published in JAMA.

A Time To Reflect and Give Thanks

 

 

 

 

Dear Members, Followers, and Visitors,

It’s hard to believe another  year has caught up with us and here we are preparing for the
Thanksgiving holiday and reflecting upon the days that have passed by in 2016.

During this year we have been expanding across  the nation and reaching far away lands
meeting great people like you who are devoted to “Raising C. diff. Awareness” with
the C Diff Foundation.  “Thank you for joining us.”

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We want to extend our gratitude to you and everyone for the very warm welcome this past
year.  In our travels, and communication we get to discover many organizations doing really good work. The ones that are successful have a unique mission and a clear understanding of how to carry out that mission.  Some organizations, however, rise above the rest and just seem to possess special ingredients not found in the others.

 

The C Diff Foundation is one of these exceptional organizations, and its special ingredients
are what makes us so proud to be a part. The first of these is our outreach programs. Offering patients and their families avenues to gain support and information is vital and greatly needed during a C. diff. infection and during the recovery time from a C. diff. infection.

The second special ingredient is the dedicated volunteering members and staff around the globe,  most of whom have been faithfully serving our Foundation since the formation in 2012.  “Thank you for all you do for the good of others.”

The third special ingredient is you and all the Volunteer Patient Advocates worldwide with the financial supporters who see to it that our mission continues spreading with promoting the “Raising C. diff. Awareness” program along with the many programs in place to make you and your communities stronger than ever in C. diff. infection prevention, treatment , support, information, and environmental safety products available.  We are truly grateful.

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As we work together today, and in the coming  year, seeking opportunities to bring hearts to a mend through the C. diff. Global Community Support Program, we hope to speak with you by telephone via: Teleconferencing sessions or in person at a local event.  We are in the process of scheduling support sessions  worldwide right now, so please let us know if you are interested in participating by contacting us by phone or through the website.

There are tele-conference sessions hosted monthly by
Dr. Caterina Oneto, MD and Dr. Paul Feuerstadt, MD to discuss the Who, What, Where of
C. diff. infections, and additional sessions offered throughout the month
to discuss financial support, pharmaceutical information, bereavement, anxiety and
depression, nutrition, and general information sessions to speak with others who
truly understand the diagnosis and able to discuss how to work through it.

Register for a free support session by calling the
Nationwide Hot-line 1-844-FOR-CDIF or by accessing the registration page on the website

https://cdifffoundation.org/cdiff-global-community-support-program-%e2%99%a5/

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We also encourage you to introduce others to the C Diff Foundation Nationwide Hot-Line available: 1-844-FOR-CDIF for information and support.

 

 

“Support is only a phone call away”

 

As we come together with friends, family, and strangers–  let us reflect on our own thoughts and reflections of gratitude and let us light a candle to signify “hope” – the shining light that we see in the shadows when turmoil and struggles occur.

The days may becoming shorter during the winter months on the horizon but our light of “hope” for better health and stronger days has never shown brighter than today.

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Thank you for sharing the C Diff Foundation’s gifts with others worldwide.

“None of us can do this alone – All of us can do this together!”

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November 29th Is Giving Tuesday – A Global Day Of Giving and Your Support Grows and Strengthens the C Diff Foundation

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#GivingTuesday

Giving Tuesday Is a global day dedicated to giving back.

On Tuesday, November 29th , 2016  Charities, Families, Businesses, Community centers, and Students around the world will come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give.

 

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#GivingTuesday was founded in 2012 by New York’s 92nd Street Y in partnership with the United Nations Foundation. Together, with a team of influential and founding partners together launched a global movement that has engaged over 10,000 organizations worldwide.

Remember the C Diff Foundation in your Giving Tuesday efforts. Your gift is tax deductible and it will support patients touched by the life-threatening C. diffiicle infection,  their families, communities and the many  programs dedicated in Raising C. diff. Awareness™   by providing information and support — from villages to cities — worldwide.

We appreciate you and all that you do for the good of others.

To Donate please visit  the C Diff Foundation Website   www.cdifffoundation.org

and choose the tab at the top of the page —

https://cdifffoundation.org/donate/

 

Thank you for your continued support and we are grateful for your generosity.

C Diff Foundation Is Approved For Google Ad Grant To Promote Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) Prevention, Treatments, Environmental Safety, And Support Worldwide

 

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The C Diff Foundation announces that it has been approved  for a Google Ad Grant equivalent to about USD 10,000 per month .  Google offers organizations free access to Google tools like Gmail, Google Calendar, Google Drive, Google Ad Grants,

“Nearly half a million Americans suffer from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year. With annual fatalities close to 29,000 a year, it’s a global problem that affects every community,” explains Nancy Caralla, Executive Director and Foundress of the
C Diff Foundation. “With the support of companies like Google, we can further raise C. diff. awareness, provide information and support  and save lives worldwide.”

We’ are truly appreciative to have Google Ad Grants as part of the C Diff Foundation’s  C. diff. educational and advocacy  program and we are confident that the AdWords Grant will help the C Diff Foundation deliver additional support to patients, their families, and healthcare professionals worldwide.

With the Google Ad Grant the C Diff Foundation is able to help raise C. diff. awareness through education about research being conducted by the government, industry, and academia; and better advocacy on behalf of patients, healthcare professionals, and researchers worldwide working to address the public health threat posed by this devastating infection.

About the C Diff Foundation:
The C Diff Foundation is a leading nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, established in 2012 and dedicated at supporting public health through education and advocating for C. difficile infection (CDI) prevention, treatments, environmental safety, and support worldwide. The Foundation’s founder is a Nurse and after suffering through C. difficile infections herself and witnessing the loss of her father, whose life was claimed by C. difficile involvement, the
C Diff Foundation came to fruition.

The C Diff Foundation, with their Volunteer Patient Advocates, successfully “Raise C. diff. Awareness” nationwide and in 38 countries, and host a Nationwide information Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) which also supports health care providers and patients to manage through the difficulties of a C. diff. infection.

 

Twitter:          @cdiffFoundation   #cdiff2016

Face Book:   https://www.facebook.com/CdiffFoundationRadio

C. diff. and Crohn’s & Colitis; Improving Quality Of Life – Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America

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Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America
Established in 1967, the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA) is a non-profit, volunteer-driven organization whose mission is to cure Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, and to improve the quality of life of children and adults affected by these diseases.

Since its founding, CCFA has remained at the forefront of research in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Today, it funds cutting-edge studies at major medical institutions, nurtures investigators at the early stages of their careers, and finances underdeveloped areas of research.

In addition, CCFA provides a comprehensive series of education programs and support services to members of the IBD community, including patients and caregivers.

Website: www.ccfa.org
Email: info@ccfa.org
Phone: 888.MY.GUT.PAIN (888.694.8872)
Address: Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America, 733 Third Avenue, Suite 510, New York, NY 10017

Irwin M. and Suzanne R. Rosenthal IBD Resource Center (IBD Help Center)
The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America’s IBD Help Center is a free service designed to provide members of the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) community with disease-specific information, guidance and support. The IBD Help Center is staffed by caring Master’s degree-level specialists who provide education on IBD management, available treatment options and coping strategies, as well as referrals to helpful resources and programs.

Hours: Monday through Friday, 9am to 5pm Eastern
Email: info@ccfa.org
Phone: 888-MY-GUT-PAIN (888-694-8872)

C Diff Foundation launches C. diff. Radio, “C. diff. Spores and More” on March 3rd, 2015

What’s new in the C Diff Foundation?  Let us introduce you to the first internet radio talk show dedicated to C. diff. and more……

C. diff. Spores and More”

We invite you to join us in listening to this exciing, new internet talk show when it debuts Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015 at the following times:

ET   2 – 3 p.m.,  CT 1 – 2 p.m.,  MT 12 – 1 p.m.,  PT 11 – 12 p.m.

We are so excited to share the debut of “C. diff. Spores and More” with you – not only because the C Diff Foundation, our Founding Executive Director –  Nancy C. Caralla, and Chairperson of Research and Development – Dr. Chandrabali Ghose, are introducing the first episode, but also because, as advocates of C. diff., we are very excited about what this cutting-edge new weekly radio show means for our Foundation’s community worldwide.

Fact: Deaths and illnesses are much higher than reports have shown. In March, 2012 the  CDC  said in a report that the C difficile infection kills 14,000 people a year. But that estimate is based on death certificates, which often don’t list the infection when patients die from complications, such as kidney failure.  Hospital billing data collected by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality shows that more than 9% of C. diff-related hospitalizations end in death — nearly five times the rate for other hospital stays. That adds up to more than 30,000 fatalities among the 347,000 C. diff hospitalizations in 2010. Thousands more patients are treated in nursing homes, clinics and doctors’ offices.

“We’re talking in the range of close to 500,000 total cases a year,” says Cliff McDonald, a C. diff expert and senior science adviser in the CDC’s Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion. And annual fatalities “may well be … as high as * 30,000.”

* AHRQ News and Numbers provides statistical highlights on the use and cost of health services and health insurance in the United States.

“This does not include the number of C. diff. infections taking place and being treated in other countries.”  “The  CDF supports hundreds of communities by sharing the CDF mission and    raising C. diff. awareness to healthcare professionals, individuals, patients, families,  and communities working towards a shared goal ~  witnessing a reduction of newly diagnosed                   C. diff. cases by 2020 .”   ” The CDF Volunteers are greatly appreciated as they create positive changes sharing their time so generously worldwide aiding in the success of our mission and raising C. diff. awareness.”

C. diff. Spores and More” will spotlight world renown topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the C. diff. community and more. Through their interviews, the CDF mission will connect, educate, and empower many in over 180 countries.

Please join us in listening to the first of many episodes of C. diff. Spores and More” debuting on Tuesday, March 3rd .

View the programs and radio information:

health.voiceamerica.com

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

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