Tag Archives: Clostridium difficile awareness

C Diff Foundation’s Volunteer Patient Advocates Promote Their Summer of 2016 Schedule Of Events “Raising C. diff. Awareness™”

VOLUNTEER PT ADVOCATES

C Diff Foundation’s Volunteer Patient Advocates; Heather Clark and Kimberly Reilly

will be “Raising C. diff. Awareness ™”  at the following events over the Summer of 2016.

 ~ Save the dates ~ 

Lycoming County Fair
1 E. Park St, Hughesville, PA 17737
Saturday, July 16 and Saturday, July 23, 2016
10 am to 10 pm

Hart-Parr Oliver Collectors Association National Summer Show
(This is the national tractor show where their Father’s tractor will be on display)
3349 Gehan Road, Canandaigua, NY 14424
Friday, August 12, 2016
* See us in the flea market section of the event; there will be acres of flea market displays
Hours not set, but we will be there all day

Wyoming County Fair
Route 6, Meshoppen, PA 18629
Saturday, September 3, 2016
10 am to 10 pm

 

Stop by their booths to learn more about C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, support, and environmental safety worldwide.

For additional information please
contact the C Diff Foundation office:  1-919-201-1512

C Diff Foundation Is Approved For Google Ad Grant To Promote Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) Prevention, Treatments, Environmental Safety, And Support Worldwide

 

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The C Diff Foundation announces that it has been approved  for a Google Ad Grant equivalent to about USD 10,000 per month .  Google offers organizations free access to Google tools like Gmail, Google Calendar, Google Drive, Google Ad Grants,

“Nearly half a million Americans suffer from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year. With annual fatalities close to 29,000 a year, it’s a global problem that affects every community,” explains Nancy Caralla, Executive Director and Foundress of the
C Diff Foundation. “With the support of companies like Google, we can further raise C. diff. awareness, provide information and support  and save lives worldwide.”

We’ are truly appreciative to have Google Ad Grants as part of the C Diff Foundation’s  C. diff. educational and advocacy  program and we are confident that the AdWords Grant will help the C Diff Foundation deliver additional support to patients, their families, and healthcare professionals worldwide.

With the Google Ad Grant the C Diff Foundation is able to help raise C. diff. awareness through education about research being conducted by the government, industry, and academia; and better advocacy on behalf of patients, healthcare professionals, and researchers worldwide working to address the public health threat posed by this devastating infection.

About the C Diff Foundation:
The C Diff Foundation is a leading nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, established in 2012 and dedicated at supporting public health through education and advocating for C. difficile infection (CDI) prevention, treatments, environmental safety, and support worldwide. The Foundation’s founder is a Nurse and after suffering through C. difficile infections herself and witnessing the loss of her father, whose life was claimed by C. difficile involvement, the
C Diff Foundation came to fruition.

The C Diff Foundation, with their Volunteer Patient Advocates, successfully “Raise C. diff. Awareness” nationwide and in 38 countries, and host a Nationwide information Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) which also supports health care providers and patients to manage through the difficulties of a C. diff. infection.

 

Twitter:          @cdiffFoundation   #cdiff2016

Face Book:   https://www.facebook.com/CdiffFoundationRadio

“It Takes A Village” Re: Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) and Healthcare-Associated Infections, By Dr. Rosie D. Lyles, MD,MHA,MSc

“It Takes a Village”
By: Rosie D. Lyles, MD, MHA, MSc, Head of Clinical Affairs for Clorox Healthcare
September 21, 2015

With increasing rates of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), C. difficile now rivals methicillin-resistance Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as the most common organism to cause healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in the United States. (1) The prevalence of C. difficile infections has more than doubled in U.S. hospitals from 2000 to 2009 (2) and CDI is regarded as one of the serious, expensive, and potentially avoidable consequences of hospitalization. The cost of treating CDI in the hospital is $3427-$9960 (in 2012), and the cost of treating patients with recurrent CDI is $11,631, for a total cost of more than $1.2 billion annually in the United States. (3-4)

In June 2015, the White House spearheaded an executive call to action focused on implementing and improving antibiotic stewardship programs (ASPs) across the continuum of care (acute care facilities, outpatient clinics, doctors’ offices and long-term care facilities). The urgency around this issue stems from the increasing number of antibiotics prescribed, which subsequently breeds multi-drug resistant organisms (MDROs) like C. difficile. Unnecessary or excessive antibiotic use combined with poor infection control practices may increase the spread of C. difficile within a facility and across facilities when infected patients transfer, such as from a hospital to a nursing home. Increasing evidence suggests that contaminated surfaces in healthcare facilities play an important role in the transmission of several key pathogens including C. difficile, vancomycin – resistant enterococci (VRE), MRSA, Acinetobacter baumannii, and norovirus.

In order to reduce HAIs, all hands on deck are required to support a successful infection prevention strategy. In other words, “it takes a village.” Growing up, I remember hearing the phrase, “it takes a village to raise a child,” meaning there is a partnership within a community with several individuals playing a role in the maturation of a youth. Within a hospital, it’s a collaborative team across several departments that implements evidence-based protocols, continues to educate staff and patients, and maintains compliance of infection control strategies/approaches to reduce the risk of a broad range of infections, including CDI. From the C-suite (administrators and senior management) to direct healthcare providers (such as physicians, nurses, aides, and therapists) and environmental staff (EVS); everyone with direct or indirect contact with a patient’s care plays an essential role.

As a healthcare professional, it’s very important for hospitals to focus on the bigger picture when it comes to infection prevention strategy and control. Prioritizing infection control measures for just one or two pathogens of concern is insufficient. At the end of the day, one pathogen doesn’t trump another because patients don’t want an HAI from ANY pathogen! The horizontal approaches aim to reduce the risk of infections due to a broad array of pathogens through implementation of standardized practices that do not depend on patient-specific conditions:

• Proper hand hygiene
Hand hygiene practices in compliance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines are a key component in preventing and controlling C. difficile, in addition to many other HAI-causing pathogens.
• Universal use of gloves or gloves and gowns
Donning the correct protective equipment minimizes contact with pathogens. It is also important to follow protocols for properly discarding this equipment.
• Universal decolonization (daily optimal bathing with chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG))
CHG bathing has been shown to decrease the bioburden of microorganisms on the patient, the environment, and the hands of healthcare personnel.
• Antimicrobial stewardship program
Ensuring every patient receives an antibiotic only when needed: the right agent, at the right dose, for the right duration.
• Evidence-based environmental cleaning and disinfection products
At a minimum, effective environmental cleaning involves using cleaners & disinfectants that are registered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Supplementing manual cleaning with new technology like ultraviolet (UV) light provides an extra layer of protection and the most comprehensive approach. UV has the highest-energy form that can inactivate dangerous and persistent pathogens by eradicating microorganism deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that may be left on surfaces, which can be missed with traditional cleaning. Finally, because C. difficile has been found in non-CDI patient rooms, using an EPA-registered sporicidal surface disinfectant to clean all patient rooms (daily and terminal) is great strategy to prevent the spread of the bacteria.

I had the pleasure of attending the CDC’s Environmental Hygiene for Ebola and Other Emerging Pathogens meeting on September 14, 2015, with attendees from academia, private industry, federal employees and health organizations, participated in a roundtable discussion on the research framework needed to determine the public health significance of non-critical environmental surface contamination and provide guidance to healthcare facilities about the methods to reduce the contamination of non-critical environmental surfaces reliably in order to improve patient safety. Every participant present at the meeting agreed that, due to the challenges/barriers that hospitals face with preventing HAIs (both from emerging pathogens and more common pathogens like C. difficile), it takes a village to successfully implement evidence-based protocols, continue to educate and maintain compliance with infection prevention protocols.

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About Rosie D. Lyles, MD, MHA, MSc, Head of Clinical Affairs for Clorox Healthcare

Rosie D. Lyles, MD, MHA, MSc is the Head of Clinical Affairs for the Clorox Professional Products Company where she serves as a research fellow and primary medical science liaison for the healthcare business, supporting all scientific research as well as clinical and product intervention design and development.
Dr. Lyles previously served as a physician researcher and study director for multiple epidemiologic research initiatives in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Cook County Health and Hospitals System, investigating healthcare-associated infections with a particular focus on the epidemiology and prevention of multidrug-resistant organisms and infections in intensive care units and in long-term acute care hospitals. She has directed numerous clinical studies and interventions for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Chicago Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Prevention Epicenter.
During her nine years as a study director and physician researcher at Hektoen Institute for Medical Research, Dr. Lyles’ work included CDC Epicenters Prevention program studies on bloodstream infections, Clostridium difficile infections and case-control studies of community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). She also performed surveillance studies of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) positive patients, examining universal contact isolation and patient skin antisepsis protocols to identify ways to optimize standard infection control measures.
Dr. Lyles received her medical degree from St. Matthew’s University School of Medicine and holds a Master of Health Service Administration from St. Joseph College. She also recently completed a Master of Science in Clinical Research and Translational Sciences through the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is an active member of the Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, the Infectious Disease Society of America, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and has served as a peer reviewer for the National Institutes of Health, New England Journal of Medicine, and American Journal of Infection Control.
References:
1. Dubberke, ER, et al. Strategies to Prevent Clostridium difficile Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2014, V35:S48-S65
2. Tabak et al., Predicting the Risk for Hospital-onset Clostridium difficile Infection (HO-CDI) at the Time if Inpatient Admission: HO-CDI Risk Score. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2015, 36: 6; 695-701
3. Magill, SS. et al. “Multistate Point-Prevalence Survey of Health Care-Associated Infections.” The New England Journal of Medicine 370.13 (2014): 1198–1208.
4. Dubberke, ER, and Olsen, MA. “Burden of Clostridium Difficile on the Healthcare System.” Clinical infectious diseases 55 Suppl. 2 (2012): S88–92.
5. Septimus, E., et al. “Approaches for preventing Healthcare-associated Infections: Go Long or Go Wide?” Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2014. 35: 7; 797-801

Stop the Spread of Antibiotic Resistance and C. difficile Infections

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Antibiotic-resistant germs cause more than 2 million illnesses and at least 23,000 deaths each year in the US.

Up to 70% fewer patients will get CRE over 5 years if facilities coordinate to protect patients.

Preventing infections and improving antibiotic prescribing could save 37,000 lives from drug-resistant infections over 5 years.

Problem:  Germs spread between patients and across health care facilities.

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Antibiotic resistance is a threat.

 

  • Nightmare germs called CRE (carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae) can cause deadly infections and have become resistant to all or nearly all antibiotics we have today. CRE spread between health care facilities like hospitals and nursing homes when appropriate actions are not taken.
  • MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) infections commonly cause pneumonia and sepsis that can be deadly.
  • The germ Pseudomonas aeruginosa can cause HAIs, including bloodstream infections. Strains resistant to almost all antibiotics have been found in hospitalized patients.
  • These germs are some of the most deadly resistant germs identified as “urgent” and “serious” threats.
C. difficile infections are at historically high rates.
  • C. difficile (Clostridium difficile), a germ commonly found in health care facilities, can be picked up from contaminated surfaces or spread from a healthcare provider’s hands.
  • Most C. difficile is not resistant to antibiotics, but when a person takes antibiotics, some good germs are destroyed. Antibiotic use allows C. difficile to take over, putting patients at high risk for deadly diarrhea.
Working together is vital.
  • Infections and antibiotic use in one facility affect other facilities because of patient transfers.
  • Public health leadership is critical so that facilities are alerted to data about resistant infections, C. difficile, or outbreaks in the area, and can target effective prevention strategies.
  • When facilities are alerted to increased threat levels, they can improve antibiotic use and infection control actions so that patients are better protected.
  • National efforts to prevent infections and improve antibiotic prescribing could prevent 619,000 antibiotic-resistant and C. difficile infections over 5 years.

 

  • “Patients and their families may wonder how they can help stop the spread of infections,” says Michael Bell, M.D., deputy director of CDC’s Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion. “When receiving health care, tell your doctor if you have been hospitalized in another facility or country, wash your hands often, and always insist that everyone have clean hands before touching you.”

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Antibiotic-resistant germs, those that no longer respond to the drugs designed to kill them, cause more than 2 million illnesses and at least 23,000 deaths each year in the United States. C. difficile caused close to half a million illnesses in 2011, and an estimated 15,000 deaths a year are directly attributable to C. difficile infections.

 The report recommends the following coordinated, two-part approach to turn this data into action that prevents illness and saves lives:

  1. Public health departments track and alert health care facilities to drug-resistant germ outbreaks in their area and the threat of germs coming from other facilities, and
  2. Health care facilities work together and with public health authorities to implement shared infection control actions to stop the spread of antibiotic-resistant germs and C. difficile between facilities.

“Antibiotic resistant infections in health care settings are a growing threat in the United States, killing thousands and thousands of people each year,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “We can dramatically reduce these infections if health care facilities, nursing homes, and public health departments work together to improve antibiotic use and infection control so patients are protected.”

The promising news is that CDC modeling projects that a coordinated approach—that is, health care facilities and health departments in an area working together—could prevent up to 70 percent of life-threatening carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) infections over five years. Additional estimates show that national infection control and antibiotic stewardship efforts led by federal agencies, health care facilities, and public health departments could prevent 619,000 antibiotic-resistant and C. difficile infections and save 37,000 lives over five years.

During the next five years, with investments, CDC’s efforts to combat C. difficile infections and antibiotic resistance under the National Strategy to Combat Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, in collaboration with other federal partners, will enhance national capabilities for antibiotic stewardship, outbreak surveillance, and antibiotic resistance prevention. These efforts hold the potential to cut the incidence of C. difficile, health care CRE, and MRSA bloodstream infections by at least half.

The proposed State Antibiotic Resistance Prevention Programs (Protect Programs) would implement this coordinated approach. These Protect Programs would be made possible by the funding proposed in the President’s FY 2016 budget request, supporting work with health care facilities in all 50 states to detect and prevent both antibiotic-resistant germs and C. difficile infections. The FY 2016 budget would also accelerate efforts to improve antibiotic stewardship in health care facilities.

 

Volunteer Advocates Raise C.diff. Awareness July 27 – August 9th at Troy (PA) and Chemung County Fair (NY)

It is with great pleasure to announce CDF representatives volunteering and advocating with
the C. Diff. Foundation,  “Raising C. diff. Awareness”  providing educational information to the thousands of fair-goers in North Central Pennsylvania and South Central New York.

The representatives will also be advocating on how to prevent acquiring a
Healthcare-Acquired Infection (HAI)  from  July 27th-August 9th.

Nearly half a million Americans suffered from a Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infection in a single year according to a study released February 25, 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   C. diff. is an important cause of infectious disease death in the U.S.
Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of an initial diagnosis of a C. diff. infection.
Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of Healthcare-Associated Infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone. Approximately
two-thirds of C. diff. infections were found to be associated with an inpatient stay in a health care facility, only 24% of the total cases occurred in patients while they were hospitalized. The study also revealed that almost as many cases occurred in nursing homes as in hospitals and the remainder of individuals acquired the Healthcare-Associated infection, C. diff., recently discharged from a health care facility. his does not include the number of C. diff. infections taking place and being treated in other countries.”  This data confirmed the necessity
to support communities through education and advocating,  sharing the C Diff Foundation’s mission and  Raising C. diff.  Awareness – working towards a shared goal;  To witness a reduction of newly diagnosed C. diff. cases by 2020.

Come visit the C Diff Foundation’s booth at the Troy Fair in the lower meadow of Alparon Park just off Route 14 in Troy, Pennsylvania, Monday, July 27th through Saturday, August 1st from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m.

The Foundation representatives will also “Raising C. diff.  Awareness”
at the Chemung County Fair commercial building, just off Route 17 in
Horseheads, New York,
Tuesday, August 4th through Sunday, August 9th from
10 a.m. to 10 p.m. There will be a drawing at each fair for a basket filled with hand soaps, and other freebies will also be available.

For more information, please contact the C Diff Foundation at 919-201-1512 or
local C Diff Foundation Representative; Heather Clark at 607-821-0575.

Dr. Nicholas Kartsonis Discusses Merck’s History In Infectious Disease and Their Ongoing Research Plus Some Of The Company’s Current Treatments, Including Dificid, To Address C. diff. Infections (CDI)

cdiffRadioLogoMarch2015                What’s new in the C Diff Foundation?

Let us introduce you to the first internet radio talk show dedicated to C. diff. and more……

C. diff. Spores and More”

 

UPCOMING SHOW:  TODAY ~ Tuesday, May 26th: 

 Dr. Nicholas Kartsonis;  Merck Research Laboratories (MRL)

Join us today, Tuesday, May 26th,  as our guest Dr. Nicholas Kartsonis , Associate Vice President of Clinical Research for Infectious Diseases for Merck Research Laboratories (MRL) and Section Head within MRL for antibiotics, antibacterials and cytomegalovirus  shares his time and discusses the past, present, and future contributions of Merck Research Laboratories.  

Dr. Kartsonis joined Merck Research Laboratories in February 2000 and has been actively involved in programs for new antibacterials, antifungals, anti-HIV, anti-CMV, and agents targeted against C. difficile infection.  Most recently, he has led the efforts to ensure the integration of the Cubist Pharmaceuticals clinical research portfolio within Merck. 

 Dr. Kartsonis will provide an overview of Merck’s current efforts to address the worldwide public health crisis posed by antimicrobial resistance, as well as the company’s history in infectious disease and antimicrobial stewardship. In addition, he will talk about the company’s current treatment for C. difficile and ongoing research efforts to address C. difficile infections (CDI).

http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

We invite you to join us in listening to this exciting, new internet talk show that broadcasts live every Tuesday at the following times:

caralla-Promo-Health

 Click Image Above to Listen to Archived Shows

 


PT 11a,  MT 12p, CT 1p, ET  2 p

 

We are pleased to share C. diff. Spores and More” with you because, as advocates of C. diff., we know how important this cutting-edge new weekly radio show means for our Foundation’s community worldwide.

Hard Facts: Deaths and illnesses are much higher than reports have shown. Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released today, February 25, 2015, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

• More than 100,000 of these infections developed among residents of U.S. nursing homes.

Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of a C. diff. infection. Of these 29,000 – 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly related to a
C. diff. infection. Therefore; C. diff. is an important cause of infectious disease death in the U.S.
Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of Healthcare-Associated Infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone. Approximately
two-thirds of C. diff. infections were found to be associated with an inpatient stay in a health care facility, only 24% of the total cases occurred in patients while they were hospitalized. The study also revealed that almost as many cases occurred in nursing homes as in hospitals and the remainder of individuals acquired the
Healthcare-Associated infection, C. diff., recently discharged from a health care facility.

This new study finds that 1 out of every 5 patients with the Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI), C. diff., experience a recurrence of the infection and 1 out of every 9 patients over the age of 65 diagnosed with a HAI – C. diff. infection died within 30 days of being diagnosed. Older Americans are quite vulnerable to this life-threatening diarrhea infection. The CDC study also found that women and Caucasian individuals are at an increased risk of acquiring a C. diff. infection. The CDC Director, Dr. Tom Frieden, MD, MPH said, “C. difficile infections cause immense suffering and death for thousands of Americans each year.” “These infections can be prevented by improving antibiotic prescribing and by improving infection control in the health care system. CDC hopes to ramp up prevention of this deadly infection by supporting State Antibiotic Resistance Prevention Programs in all 50 states.”

“This does not include the number of C. diff. infections taking place and being treated in other countries.”  “The  CDF supports hundreds of communities by sharing the CDF mission and    raising C. diff. awareness to healthcare professionals, individuals, patients, families,  and communities working towards a shared goal ~  witnessing a reduction of newly diagnosed            C. diff. cases by 2020 .”   ” The CDF Volunteers are greatly appreciated as they create positive changes sharing their time so generously worldwide aiding in the success of our mission and raising C. diff. awareness.”

C. diff. Spores and More” spotlights world renown topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the C. diff. community and more.

Through their interviews, the CDF mission will connect, educate, and empower many worldwide.

 

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

 

Please join us Tuesdays in listening to the educational episodes of C. diff. Spores and More”

View the programs and radio information and access previous episodes available as a podcast by clicking on the link below:

www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

C. diff. Survivors Share Their Journey Through a C. diff. Infection (CDI) On C diff Spores and More, C diff Radio

cdiffRadioLogoMarch2015

What’s new in the C Diff Foundation?

Let us introduce you to the first internet radio talk show dedicated to C. diff. and more……

C. diff. Spores and More”

 

UPCOMING SHOW:  Tuesday, May 12th: 

C diff survivors share their unique journey through a C diff infection and how it changed their lives forever

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report published in
February 2015, almost 500,000 C.diff. infections occurred in the U.S. in 2011, with 83,000 recurrences.

Join our guests – all  C. diff. survivor’s – who have been touched by this horrific
and life changing infection.

Heather Clark, Veronica Edmond, Renetta Dudzinski, and Lisa Hurka Covington bravely share their unique journey through a C. diff. infection that forever changed their lives.

 http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

…… we strongly recommend having a box of tissues nearby ………..

 

Listen in live at:     11a Pacific, 12p Mountain, 1p Central, 2p Eastern time

We are so excited to share  C. diff. Spores and More” with you because, as advocates of C. diff., we are very excited about what this cutting-edge new weekly radio show means for our Foundation’s community worldwide.

Fact: Deaths and illnesses are much higher than reports have shown. Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released today, February 25, 2015, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

• More than 100,000 of these infections developed among residents of U.S. nursing homes.

Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of a C. diff. infection. Of these 29,000 – 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly related to a
C. diff. infection. Therefore; C. diff. is an important cause of infectious disease death in the U.S.
Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of Healthcare-Associated Infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone. Approximately
two-thirds of C. diff. infections were found to be associated with an inpatient stay in a health care facility, only 24% of the total cases occurred in patients while they were hospitalized. The study also revealed that almost as many cases occurred in nursing homes as in hospitals and the remainder of individuals acquired the Healthcare-Associated infection, C. diff., recently discharged from a health care facility.

This new study finds that 1 out of every 5 patients with the Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI), C. diff., experience a recurrence of the infection

Older Americans are quite vulnerable to this life-threatening diarrhea infection. The CDC study also found that women and Caucasian individuals are at an increased risk of acquiring a C. diff. infection. The CDC Director, Dr. Tom Frieden, MD, MPH said, “C. difficile infections cause immense suffering and death for thousands of Americans each year.” “These infections can be prevented by improving antibiotic prescribing and by improving infection control in the health care system. CDC hopes to ramp up prevention of this deadly infection by supporting State Antibiotic Resistance Prevention Programs in all 50 states.”

“This does not include the number of C. diff. infections taking place and being treated in other countries.”  “The  CDF supports hundreds of communities by sharing the CDF mission and    raising C. diff. awareness to healthcare professionals, individuals, patients, families,  and communities working towards a shared goal ~  witnessing a reduction of newly diagnosed            C. diff. cases by 2020 .”   ” The CDF Volunteers are greatly appreciated as they create positive changes sharing their time so generously worldwide aiding in the success of our mission and raising C. diff. awareness.”

C. diff. Spores and More” spotlights world renown topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the C. diff. community and more.

Through these interviews, the CDF mission will connect, educate, and empower many in over 180 countries.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

 

Please join us Tuesdays in listening to the educational episodes of C. diff. Spores and More”

View the programs and radio information and access previous episodes available as a podcast by clicking on the link below:

www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

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