Tag Archives: Gastroenterology

Rebiotix Treats First Patient In Phase 1 Study of RBX7455 Oral Capsule – A Formulation of Rebiotix’s Microbiota Restoration Therapy (MRT)

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Rebiotix Treats First Patient in Phase 1 Study of RBX7455, an Orally Delivered Broad-Spectrum Non-Frozen MicrobiotaROSEVILLE, Minn., Jan. 4, 2017

 

Rebiotix Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company focused on harnessing the power of the human microbiome to treat challenging diseases, announced today that the first patient has been treated in a Phase 1 study of RBX7455 for the prevention of recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infection.

RBX7455 is a lyophilized non-frozen oral capsule formulation of Rebiotix’s Microbiota Restoration Therapy (MRT), a standardized, stabilized drug technology that is designed to rehabilitate the human microbiome by delivering a broad spectrum of live microbes into a patient’s intestinal tract via a ready-to-use and easy-to-administer format.

RBX7455 lyophilized capsules remove the need for patients to keep the product frozen or refrigerated.

This prospective, single center, two-arm Phase 1 study is a proof of concept dosing study of RBX7455 for the prevention of recurrent C. diff. infection, an increasingly difficult-to-resolve intestinal infection that causes approximately 29,000 deaths in the U.S. each year.1 It is also the first clinical study of an oral microbiota therapy that allows the patient to take the medication at home.

  • RBX7455 requires no special handling or storage needs for patients. The study will enroll approximately 20 patients at a single U.S. site and is being conducted by the Mayo Clinic, a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care, research and education.

“New therapies are urgently needed to prevent recurrent C. diff., a debilitating, costly and potentially life-threatening infection,” said Dr. Sahil Khanna, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, who is leading the study. “RBX7455 not only provides standardized and stabilized human microbes orally, but may provide several advantages in terms of patient dosing and therapy accessibility since no freezing or refrigeration is needed when the patient takes the product home.”

The initiation of the Phase 1 study of RBX7455 enhances Rebiotix’s clinical pipeline of human microbiome-directed drug candidates. The Company’s lead drug candidate, RBX2660, recently completed a Phase 2b randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial examining the efficacy and safety of the microbiota restoration therapeutic as a prevention for recurrent C. diff. infection after a standard of care course of antibiotics (PUNCH™ CD2).

“Dosing the first patient in the Phase 1 study of RBX7455 is a significant milestone for Rebiotix as it solidifies our position as the most clinically advanced microbiome company in the industry, while showcasing the potential of our MRT platform to create new solutions for challenging diseases through standardized microbiota-based drug development,” stated Lee Jones, president and CEO of Rebiotix. ”

RBX7455 is a potentially ground-breaking product for Rebiotix and the entire microbiome industry in that the lyophilized oral capsules do not need to be kept frozen and thus can be stocked in a pharmacy with no special handling or storage needs. As such, RBX7455 offers the unique opportunity to introduce live microbial therapy as a potential treatment for numerous diseases where chronic or repeat dosing is required.”

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected
*Please note – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse any products and/or clinical study in progress. All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only. Thank You.

Rebiotix Is Issued U.S. Patent For Its Patent Application Entitled “Microbiota Restoration Therapy (MRT) Compositions and Methods Of Manufacture”

Rebiotix Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company focused on harnessing the power of the human microbiome to treat challenging diseases,  announced on October 11, 2016 that the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has issued U.S. Patent No. 9,433,651 to Rebiotix for its patent application entitled, “Microbiota Restoration Therapy (MRT), Compositions and Methods of Manufacture.” The patent covers Microbiota Restoration Therapy (MRT) compositions and methods for manufacturing, processing and delivering the compositions, and builds on Rebiotix’s patent issuances in Australia and Canada.

MRT is a standardized, stabilized drug technology that is designed to rehabilitate the human microbiome by delivering a broad spectrum of live microbes into a patient’s intestinal tract via a readyto-use and easy-to-administer format. The patented technology is based on ground-breaking work that provides an avenue for the treatment of a variety of diseases including Clostridium difficile (C.diff), ulcerative colitis, hepatic encephalopathy and multi-drug resistant organisms.

“This patent covering our MRT platform is a significant addition to Rebiotix’s IP estate as we continue to advance our industry-leading pipeline of microbiome-directed drug therapies, including RBX2660, our Phase 3-ready drug candidate,” stated Lee Jones, Chief Executive Officer of Rebiotix. “Rebiotix has established one of the deepest IP portfolios in the microbiome industry covering an array of subjects, from formulation and storage to delivery and disease targets, that we believe are key to the eventual commercialization of microbiota-based therapeutics.”

https://cdifffoundation.org/clinical-trials-2/

 

About Rebiotix Inc.

Rebiotix Inc. is a clinical-stage biotechnology company focused on harnessing the power of the human microbiome to revolutionize the treatment of challenging diseases. Rebiotix is the most clinically advanced microbiome company in the industry, with its Phase 3-ready drug candidate, RBX2660, having successfully completed a Phase 2b randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial as a potential treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (PUNCH™ CD2). RBX2660 has been granted Orphan Drug status, Fast Track status and Breakthrough Therapy Designation from the FDA for its potential to treat recurrent C. diff. infection.

Rebiotix’s development pipeline includes multiple formulations targeting several disease indications and is built around its pioneering Microbiota Restoration Therapy (MRT) platform. MRT is a standardized, stabilized drug technology that is designed to rehabilitate the human microbiome by delivering a broad spectrum of live microbes into a patient’s intestinal tract via a ready-to-use and easy-to-administer format. For more information on Rebiotix and its pipeline of human microbiome-directed therapies, visit www.rebiotix.com.

source:  Rebiotix

U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Has Approved Merck’s (MSD) ZINPLAVA ™ (bezlotoxumab) Injection 25mg/ml To Reduce Recurrence Of Clostridium difficile Infection In Patients 18 Years Of Age Or Older

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Merck  known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, on October 22, 2016 announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved ZINPLAVA™ (bezlotoxumab) Injection 25 mg/mL.

Merck anticipates making ZINPLAVA available in first quarter 2017.

ZINPLAVA is indicated to reduce recurrence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients 18 years of age or older who are receiving antibacterial drug treatment of CDI and are at high risk for CDI recurrence.

ZINPLAVA is not indicated for the treatment of CDI.

ZINPLAVA is not an antibacterial drug. ZINPLAVA should only be used in conjunction with antibacterial drug treatment of CDI.

Please see Prescribing Information for ZINPLAVA (bezlotoxumab) at http://www.merck.com/product/usa/pi_circulars/z/zinplava/zinplava_pi.pdf 

 

Patient Information for ZINPLAVA at http://www.merck.com/product/usa/pi_circulars/z/zinplava/zinplava_ppi.pdf

CDI is caused by bacteria that produce toxins, including toxin B. Symptoms of CDI include mild-to-severe diarrhea, abdominal pain and fever. The incidence of recurrent CDI is higher in certain patient populations, including people 65 years of age or older and those with compromised immune systems.

“For generations, Merck has been steadfast in its commitment to fighting infectious diseases – and that commitment continues today. ZINPLAVA is a human monoclonal antibody that binds to C. difficile toxin B and neutralizes its effects,” said Dr. Nicholas Kartsonis, vice president of clinical development, infectious diseases, Merck Research Laboratories.

Selected safety information about ZINPLAVA

Heart failure was reported more commonly in the two Phase 3 clinical trials in ZINPLAVA-treated patients compared to placebo-treated patients. These adverse reactions occurred primarily in patients with underlying congestive heart failure (CHF). In patients with a history of CHF, 12.7% (15/118) of ZINPLAVA-treated patients and 4.8% (5/104) of placebo-treated patients had the serious adverse reaction of heart failure during the 12-week study period. Additionally, in patients with a history of CHF, there were more deaths in ZINPLAVA-treated patients [19.5% (23/118)] than in placebo-treated patients [12.5% (13/104)] during the 12-week study period. The causes of death varied, and included cardiac failure, infections, and respiratory failure. In patients with a history of CHF, ZINPLAVA (bezlotoxumab) should be reserved for use when the benefit outweighs the risk.

The most common adverse reactions occurring within 4 weeks of infusion with a frequency greater than placebo and reported in ≥4% of patients treated with ZINPLAVA and Standard of Care (SoC) antibacterial drug therapy vs placebo and SoC antibacterial drug therapy included nausea (7% vs 5%), pyrexia (5% vs 3%) and headache (4% vs 3%).

Serious adverse reactions occurring within 12 weeks following infusion were reported in 29% of ZINPLAVA-treated patients and 33% of placebo-treated patients. Heart failure was reported as a serious adverse reaction in 2.3% of ZINPLAVA-treated patients and 1.0% of placebo-treated patients.

In ZINPLAVA-treated patients, 10% experienced one or more infusion specific adverse reactions compared to 8% of placebo-treated patients, on the day of or the day after, the infusion. Infusion specific adverse reactions reported in ≥0.5% of patients receiving ZINPLAVA and at a frequency greater than placebo were nausea (3%), fatigue (1%), pyrexia (1%), dizziness (1%), headache (2%), dyspnea (1%) and hypertension (1%). Of these patients, 78% experienced mild adverse reactions, and 20% of patients experienced moderate adverse reactions. These reactions resolved within 24 hours following onset.

As with all therapeutic proteins, there is a potential for immunogenicity following administration of ZINPLAVA. The detection of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Additionally, the observed incidence of antibody (including neutralizing antibody) positivity in an assay may be influenced by several factors including assay methodology, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medications, and underlying disease. For these reasons, comparison of the incidence of antibodies to bezlotoxumab in two Phase 3 studies with the incidence of antibodies in other studies or to other products may be misleading. Following treatment with ZINPLAVA in these two studies, none of the 710 evaluable patients tested positive for treatment-emergent anti-bezlotoxumab antibodies.

About bezlotoxumab

Bezlotoxumab was developed by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s MassBiologics Laboratory in conjunction with Medarex (now part of Bristol-Myers Squibb), and was licensed to Merck in 2009.

Please see Prescribing Information for ZINPLAVA (bezlotoxumab) at http://www.merck.com/product/usa/pi_circulars/z/zinplava/zinplava_pi.pdf 

 

About Merck

For 125 years, Merck has been a global health care leader working to help the world be well. Merck is known as MSD outside the United States and Canada. Through our prescription medicines, vaccines, biologic therapies, and animal health products, we work with customers and operate in more than 140 countries to deliver innovative health solutions. We also demonstrate our commitment to increasing access to health care through far-reaching policies, programs and partnerships.

For more information, visit www.merck.com

To read this article in its entirety please click on the following link

http://www.pharmiweb.com/PressReleases/pressrel.asp?ROW_ID=187373#.WAsjR8li9kk

 

*Please note – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse any product and/or clinical study in progress. All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only.

ProNourish ™ Nutritional Drink Information For Healthcare Professionals — For Patients With Food Intolerance And Digestive Discomfort

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*Please note – The
C Diff Foundation does not endorse any product and/or clinical study in progress. All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only. If you have questions, please contact the companies directly. Thank you.

 

FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS **

………………………

For Patients with Food Intolerance
ProNourish™ Nutritional Drink is a unique option for patients who suffer with digestive discomfort and are following an exclusion diet.

It was specifically formulated with the guidance of healthcare professionals to be compliant with a Low FODMAP Diet and is Low FODMAP Certified by Monash University. Monash University Low Fodmap Certified™
Benefits in every bottle:
Low in FODMAPs*
3 g of Fiber
15 g of High Quality Protein
25 Essential Vitamins and Minerals
Suitable for Lactose Intolerance**

NO Gluten
NO High Fructose Corn Syrup
NO Sugar Alcohols or Artificial Colors
NO Inulin
NO Fructooligosaccharides
ProNourish™ Nutritional Drink helps make following a Low FODMAP Diet easier by providing a balanced mini-meal or snack without the ingredients that might trigger symptoms of digestive discomfort. Its just one more way Nestlé Health Science strives to help nourish patients quality of life through the power of nutrition.
HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS ONLY: Order Free Samples!
For Your Patients
To get your FREE samples, use promo code PRON-13851-1016.

Find out more about ProNourish™ Drink at ProNourish.com

or visit LowFODMAPcentral.com

For information and handouts for your patients.

Stop by the ProNourish™ Drink booth during these upcoming events!

2016 Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo™ (FNCE®): October 16–18
(booth #2951)
2016 ACG American College of Gastroenterology Meeting: October 16–18
(booth #1114)

*Formulated to be low in specific carbs (called FODMAPs) that can be difficult for some people to digest.

**Not for individuals with Galactosemia.

Monash University Low FODMAP Certified™ trademarks used under license by Nestlé.

A strict Low FODMAP Diet should only be commenced under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Provides Updates On C. difficile Infection Management and Treatment

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Clostridium difficile infection (C. difficile) “has become the most common microbial cause of healthcare-associated infections in U.S. hospitals and costs up to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs for acute care facilities alone.”

Statistics provided by the CDC suggest that C. difficile cause nearly 500,000 infections in patients in the US annually.

In one study noted by the CDC, among infected patients, nearly 29,000 died within 30 days of being diagnosed, and more than half of those deaths (15,000) were directly attributable to C. difficile infection.

With C. difficile infection prevention being declared a national priority by the CDC, researchers, public health officials, infectious disease specialists, and others continue to research more effective ways to combat this microbe. Below, we’ve collected links and information on several recent developments.

THE GOOD NEWS
The Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) recently -hospital-stewardship-lowers-antibiotic-use-infections”>reported some good news about the effectiveness of antibiotic stewardship programs (ASPs) in reducing antibiotic usage, especially among patients in the intensive care unit.

Citing the results of a meta-analysis published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, the CIDRAP report noted that, following the implementation of an ASP, “hospital antimicrobial consumption across all studies declined by 19.1%, and antibiotic costs fell by 33.9%. Though a modest decrease of 12.1% in antimicrobial use occurred in general medical wards, antimicrobial use in ICUs fell by 39.5% across the four studies that looked at that parameter.”

The meta-analysis also found that ASPs were effective in curbing the use of non-antibiotic therapies. In the six studies that also monitored antifungal prescription rates, the authors reported a 39.1% decline after ASP initiation.

The use of third- and fourth generation antibiotics (such as cephalosporins, vancomycin, tigecycline, linezolid, imipenem, meropenem, and fluoroquinolones) declined by 26.6% in facilities that implemented an ASP.

The meta-analysis found that bacteria infection rates declined 4.5% in the studies that measured clinical outcomes, and length of hospital stay fell by nearly 9% in studies that measured that metric.

However, the CIDRAP report noted that ASP implementation was not “associated with declining risks for Clostridium difficile (C diff) infections.” The authors of the meta-analysis did note that, in three studies that evaluated C difficile rates, “significant publication bias favored studies that reported ASPs’ negative effects.”

Let’s just get right to the heart of this report from Reuters:

“Fifteen years after the U.S. government declared antibiotic-resistant infections to be a grave threat to public health, a Reuters investigation has found that infection-related deaths are going uncounted, hindering the nation’s ability to fight a scourge that exacts a significant human and financial toll. Even when recorded, tens of thousands of deaths from drug-resistant infections – as well as many more infections that sicken but don’t kill people – go uncounted because federal and state agencies are doing a poor job of tracking them.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the go-to national public health monitor, and state health departments lack the political, legal and financial wherewithal to impose rigorous surveillance.”

The report goes on to outline how incomplete, “patchwork” infection reporting requirements for hospitals, and lax requirements in many states regarding physicians’ responsibilities when filling out death certificates, have led to deaths caused by (or at the very least associated with) MRSA and other drug-resistant pathogens to be “grossly under-reported.”

For example, according to Reuters, only 17 states require notification of C. difficile infections. Only two of the so-called “superbug” infections (MRSA bacteremia and C. difficile) are required to be reported to the CDC’s National Healthcare Safety Network surveillance program.

As they say, read the whole thing.

The authors of an article published in Clinical Microbiology and Infection  reported on a study that compared treatment with tigecycline to standard therapy in adult patients with severe C. difficile infection (sCDI).

The retrospective cohort study compared outcomes in patients with sCDI who received tigecycline alone to outcomes in patients who received standard oral vancomycin combined with intravenous metronidazole.

The primary study outcome was clinical recovery (as determined by European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases guidelines); secondary outcomes were “in-hospital and 90-day all-cause mortality and relapse, colectomy and complication rates.”

A total of 90 patients with sCDI were treated (45 in each group). Patients treated with tigecycline monotherapy tended to do better in terms of cure rate, complicated disease, and CDI sepsis.

The authors reported that, compared to the group that received standard therapy, the tigecycline group had “significantly better outcomes of clinical cure (34/45, 75.6% vs. 24/45, 53.3%; p=0.02), less complicated disease course (13/45, 28.9% vs. 24/45, 53.3%; p=0.02) and less CDI sepsis (7/45, 15.6% vs. 18/45, 40.0%; p=0.009).”

Rates of mortality, disease relapse, and other measures were similar between the groups.

These results led the researchers to conclude that “tigecycline might be considered as a potential candidate for therapeutic usage in cases of sCDI refractory to standard treatment.”

Our good friends at Contagion Live recently reported on a study that has uncovered how the C. difficile bacteria produces toxins, which could aid the development of nonantibiotic drugs to fight C. difficile infection.

According to Contagion Live, C. difficile produces two toxins, toxin A and toxin B, that “cause life-threatening diarrhea as well as pseudomembranous colitis, toxic megacolon, perforations in the colon, sepsis and rarely death.”

Researchers at the University of Texas found that strains of C. difficile with a mutation in a particular Agr locus in their genome could not produce the toxins.

“Identifying a pathway responsible for activating the production of the toxins… opens up a unique therapeutic target for the development of a novel nonantibiotic therapy for C. difficile infections,” said the study authors.

The Contagion Live article includes a quote from author Charles Darkoh, PhD, on the potential implications of these findings.

“By crippling their toxin-making machinery, C. diff cannot make toxins and thus cannot cause disease. My laboratory is already working on this and was awarded a 5-year National Institutes of Health grant to investigate and develop an oral compound we have identified that inactivate the toxins and block the toxin-making machinery of C. diff by targeting this pathway,” he said.

 

 

To read article in its entirety click on the link below:

 http://www.hcplive.com/medical-news/latest-news-and-updates-on-c-difficile-infection-management-and-treatment/P-4#sthash.iDm6FgAP.dpuf

 

U.Va.’s Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health Could Lead To a New Treatment For C. diff. Infection (CDI)

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Every year, about half a million patients are infected by Clostridium difficile, an otherwise harmless bacterium that can multiply out of control when the use of antibiotics upsets the balance of microorganisms in the gut. In 2011, about 15,000 deaths were directly attributable to the infection, according to a recent study by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Current probiotic treatments, which promote the growth of helpful bacteria, have been ineffective against the infection, also known as C. diff.

But work being done at U.Va.’s Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health could lead to a new treatment by the end of the calendar year, according to Dr. Bill Petri, chief of the division. That’s an unusually optimistic estimate in medical research, where scientific breakthroughs predate new treatments by several years.

“Some of these advanced probiotics are actually being tested today in the clinic for their role,” Petri said. “We’re actually participating in advanced clinical trials at U.Va.”

Immunologist Erica L. Buonomo was the driving force behind the new discovery, Petri said, which has to do with the role of white blood cells in protecting against C. diff.

Buonomo found that a particular type of white blood cells, called eosinophils, act as a barrier against the infection, which breaks down the lining of the gut. These eosinophils are recruited by a protein called IL-25. A serious C. diff infection kills eosinophils, allowing the bacteria to enter the gut.

The researchers found that gut bacteria stimulate the production of IL-25, so the right probiotic could help with the production of protective eosinophils.

“We identified a pathway in the immune response that reduces the severity of an infection,” Buonomo said. “When we activate this pathway, we find mice are a lot less sick.”

The discovery would be especially helpful for elderly patients, who are most at risk. It also could have larger implications in the world of microbiology.

Eosinophils are best known for their role in allergic reactions and asthma attacks, when a high number of eosinophils cause inflammation.

The function of these cells was not entirely clear before Buonomo’s discovery. She believes this knowledge could help doctors fight other types of gastrointestinal disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome.

U.Va. is now working on a probiotic with a Boston-based firm called Seres Therapeutics 

The finished product will be tested in Charlottesville, Petri said.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the link below:

C. difficile Infection (CDI) Prevention, Treatment, Environmental Safety, Research, Clinical Trials Being Discussed with World Topic Experts On September 20th In Atlanta, Georgia USA

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September 20th

It is with great pride and certainty in the power of the healthcare community to present the 4th Annual International Raising. C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health Expo

being hosted at the

DoubleTree by Hilton — Atlanta Airport 
3400 Norman Berry Drive
Atlanta,Georgia 30344 USA  (Hotel Phone: 1-404-763-1600)

Doors open at 7:15 a.m — Sign In and Continental Breakfast

Conference begins at: 7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

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Raising C. difficile awareness is essential to build upon and advance existing knowledge and necessary for overcoming the challenges our healthcare communities are faced with today.

“None of us can do this alone — All of us can do this together”

Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released February 25, 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   C. diff. is a leading cause of infectious disease death worldwide; 29,000 died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis in the USA.   Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of healthcare-associated infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone.

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Cdiff2015-1Clinical professionals gather for one day to present up-to-date data to expand on the existing knowledge and raise awareness of the urgency focused on a Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) —

    • Prevention
    • Treatments
    • Research
    • Environmental Safety
    • Clinical trials and studies

WITH

  • Microbiome research, studies
  • Infection Prevention
  • Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants for Adults & Pediatrics
  • A Panel Of C. diff. Infection Survivors
  • Antibiotic Stewardship
  • Healthcare EXPO
    ……………………and much more.

You won’t want to miss out on this opportunity to learn from
International topic experts delivering data directed at evidence-based
prevention, treatments, and environmental safety in the C. diff.
and healthcare community.

Gain insights on September 20th that will not be available anywhere else with an opportunity to receive up-to-date data on major topics in this program being presented in one day.

5 Leading reasons to attend this dynamic conference:

  • Learn from leading healthcare professionals, clinicians, researchers, and industry.
  • Networking opportunities with new and reconnect with those in the healthcare community with similar interests.
  • Gain breakthrough results through research in progress and gaining positive results. Programs focused on Antibiotic-resistance such as the  Antibiotic Stewardship making a difference. Front line developments in progress focused on C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety.
  • Implement and share the knowledge well after the conference ends.  Every attendee receives a booklet with guest speakers information, media to review audio programs, and Health Expo Sponsor information focused on the important agenda topics.
  • Embrace the opportunity, with all of the topic experts presenting, and hold the conference in the highest priority from the participation in this conference to an audience of medical students, and fellow healthcare professionals, who will benefit the most from the data and gain tools to overcome the barriers facing healthcare each day.

“The information and up-to-date studies shared at the 2015 conference added to an existing knowledge base that helps us to continue delivering quality care in the medical community.”   Linda Davis, RN,BSN

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REGISTRATION FEES:

$75.00  —  Conference Registration

$30.00  —  Student Conference Registration (Student ID To Be Presented At the Door)

TO REGISTER Click on the “Raising C. diff. Awareness” Ribbon below

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Room accommodations are available —  Complete and Confirm 

by August 19th to reserve your hotel reservations.   

To create a reservation please click on the DoubleTree By Hilton Logo below – – – – – –

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 A suggested travel coordinator, for your convenience

LibertyTraveldownloadMichael Beckman — Team Leader,  Liberty Travel, 467 Washington Street, Boston, MA  02111
617-936-2435
Michael.Beckman@flightcenter.com

 For Additional Information visit the C Diff Foundation Website:

https://cdifffoundation.org/

https://cdifffoundation.org/

And Click on the 2016 September Conference Tab

 

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