Tag Archives: Healthcare Professionals

Severe Cases of C.diff. Infection (CDI)Study Suggests the Most Routinely Prescribed Antibiotic Is Not the Best Treatment

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Over the past two decades there has been a sharp rise in the number and severity of infections caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile  (C. diff ) now the most common healthcare-acquired infection in the United States.

 

As published – to view the article in its entirety please click on the link below to be redirected:

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-02/uou-rpa020117.php

But a new study suggests that the most routinely prescribed antibiotic is not the best treatment for severe cases. Scientists at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System and University of Utah report that patients with a severe C. diff infection (CDI) were less likely to die when treated with the antibiotic vancomycin compared to the standard treatment of metronidazole.

The findings will be published online on Feb. 6, 2017 on the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine website.

C. diff does not cause illness outright. The bacterium produces two chemicals that are toxic to the human body. These toxins work in concert to irritate the cells of the Large intestinal lining producing the symptoms associated with the illness. Symptoms of CDI include watery diarrhea, fever, loss of appetite, nausea, and abdominal pain and tenderness. Severe cases are associated with inflammation of the colon.

Current guidelines primarily recommend two antibiotics metronidazole or vancomycin to treat CDI. While vancomycin was the original treatment, the medical community has favored metronidazole for the past few decades, because it is less expensive and will limit vancomycin resistance in other hospital-acquired infections. The guidelines are based on small clinical trials carried out about 30 years ago.

“For many years the two antibiotics were considered to be equivalent in their ability to cure C. diff and prevent recurrent disease,” says Stevens. “Our work and several other studies show that this isn’t always the case.” In the current issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, the research team looked at the effectiveness of the two drugs by comparing the risk of mortality after treatment with these two antibiotics.

The investigators conducted the largest study to date by examining the data from more than 10,000 patients treated for CDI through the US Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare system from 2005 to 2012. A severe case of CDI was defined as a patient with an elevated white blood cell count or serum creatinine within four days of the CDI diagnosis. A mild to moderate case of CDI was defined as a patient with normal white blood cell counts and creatinine levels. About 35 percent of cases in this study were considered severe.

Patients with a severe case of CDI had lower mortality rates when treated with vancomycin compared to metronidazole (15.3 percent versus 19.8 percent). The scientists calculated that only 25 patients with severe CDI would need to be treated with vancomycin to prevent one death. “That is a powerful, positive outcome for our patient’s well-being,” explains Stevens. She cautions that the researchers still do not understand how the choice of antibiotic affects mortality rates.

“Although antibiotics are one of the greatest miracles of modern medicine, there are still tremendous gaps in our knowledge about when and how to use them to give our patients the best health outcomes,” explains Michael Rubin, M.D., Ph.D., an associate professor in internal medicine and an investigator at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System.

“This research shows that if providers choose vancomycin over metronidazole to treat patients with severe CDI, it should result in a lower risk of death for those critically ill patients,” said Rubin. This study showed that less than 15 percent of CDI patients, including severe cases, received vancomycin.

The study results did not show a difference in the rate of the illness returning following either antibiotic treatment whether the initial illness was mild to moderate or severe. Nor did it show a difference for the rate of death following either antibiotic treatment for mild to moderate CDI cases.

Stevens cautions that the study was observational in nature and does not prove cause and effect of the drug. In addition, the study focused on patients that were primarily men; however, past studies show that the C. diff treatment outcomes for men and women were similar.

According to Stevens, future work should balance the targeted application of vancomycin treatment, especially for severe CDI cases, with economic considerations and the consequences of antibiotic resistance. “The optimal way to move forward is to do decision analysis that allows us to weigh the pros and cons of the various treatment strategies,” she says.

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The research was funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, Office of Research and Development, Health Services Research and Development.

In addition to Stevens and Rubin, co-authors include Richard Nelson, Karim Khader, Makoto Jones, Lindsay Croft and Matthew Samore (University of Utah and the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System), Elyse Schwab-Daugherty and Kevin A. Brown (Public Health Ontario and University of Toronto), Tom Greene (University of Utah), Melinda Neuhauser (VA Pharmacy Benefits Management Services) and Peter Glassman and Matthew Bidwell Goetz (VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System).

ProNourish ™ Nutritional Drink Information For Healthcare Professionals — For Patients With Food Intolerance And Digestive Discomfort

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*Please note – The
C Diff Foundation does not endorse any product and/or clinical study in progress. All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only. If you have questions, please contact the companies directly. Thank you.

 

FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS **

………………………

For Patients with Food Intolerance
ProNourish™ Nutritional Drink is a unique option for patients who suffer with digestive discomfort and are following an exclusion diet.

It was specifically formulated with the guidance of healthcare professionals to be compliant with a Low FODMAP Diet and is Low FODMAP Certified by Monash University. Monash University Low Fodmap Certified™
Benefits in every bottle:
Low in FODMAPs*
3 g of Fiber
15 g of High Quality Protein
25 Essential Vitamins and Minerals
Suitable for Lactose Intolerance**

NO Gluten
NO High Fructose Corn Syrup
NO Sugar Alcohols or Artificial Colors
NO Inulin
NO Fructooligosaccharides
ProNourish™ Nutritional Drink helps make following a Low FODMAP Diet easier by providing a balanced mini-meal or snack without the ingredients that might trigger symptoms of digestive discomfort. Its just one more way Nestlé Health Science strives to help nourish patients quality of life through the power of nutrition.
HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS ONLY: Order Free Samples!
For Your Patients
To get your FREE samples, use promo code PRON-13851-1016.

Find out more about ProNourish™ Drink at ProNourish.com

or visit LowFODMAPcentral.com

For information and handouts for your patients.

Stop by the ProNourish™ Drink booth during these upcoming events!

2016 Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo™ (FNCE®): October 16–18
(booth #2951)
2016 ACG American College of Gastroenterology Meeting: October 16–18
(booth #1114)

*Formulated to be low in specific carbs (called FODMAPs) that can be difficult for some people to digest.

**Not for individuals with Galactosemia.

Monash University Low FODMAP Certified™ trademarks used under license by Nestlé.

A strict Low FODMAP Diet should only be commenced under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

Learn More About The Signs and Symptoms Of Sepsis With The CDC; It’s A Race Against Time

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Saving patients from sepsis is a race against time

CDC calls sepsis a medical emergency; encourages prompt action for prevention, early recognition

Sepsis is caused by the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening response to an infection and requires rapid intervention. It begins outside of the hospital for nearly 80 percent of patients. According to a new Vital Signs report released by CDC, about 7 in 10 patients with sepsis had used health care services recently or had chronic diseases that required frequent medical care. These represent opportunities for healthcare providers to prevent, recognize, and treat sepsis long before it can cause life-threatening illness or death.

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“When sepsis occurs, it should be treated as a medical emergency,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “Doctors and nurses can prevent sepsis and also the devastating effects of sepsis, and patients and families can watch for sepsis and ask, ‘could this be sepsis?’”   

Certain people with an infection are more likely to get sepsis, including people age 65 years or older, infants less than 1 year old, people who have weakened immune systems, and people who have chronic medical conditions (such as diabetes). While much less common, even healthy children and adults can develop sepsis from an infection, especially when not recognized early. The signs and symptoms of sepsis include: shivering, fever, or feeling very cold; extreme pain or discomfort; clammy or sweaty skin; confusion or disorientation; shortness of breath and a high heart rate.

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According to the Vital Signs report, infections of the lung, urinary tract, skin, and gut most often led to sepsis. In most cases, the germ that caused the infection leading to sepsis was not identified. When identified, the most common germs leading to sepsis were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and some types of Streptococcus.

 

Health care providers, patients and their family members can work as a team to prevent sepsis.

Health care providers play a critical role in protecting patients from infections that can lead to sepsis and recognizing sepsis early. Health care providers can:

·         Prevent infections. Follow infection control requirements (such as handwashing) and ensure patients to get recommended vaccines (e.g., flu and pneumococcal).

·         Educate patients and their families. Stress the need to prevent infections, manage chronic conditions, and, if an infection is not improving, promptly seek care. Don’t delay.

·         Think sepsis. Know the signs and symptoms to identify and treat patients earlier.

·         Act fast. If sepsis is suspected, order tests to help determine if an infection is present, where it is, and what caused it. Start antibiotics and other recommended medical care immediately.

·         Reassess patient management. Check patient progress frequently. Reassess antibiotic therapy 24-48 hours or sooner to change therapy as needed. Determine whether the type of antibiotics, dose, and duration are correct.

CDC is working on five key areas related to sepsis:

·         Increasing sepsis awareness by engaging clinical professional organizations and patient advocates.

·         Aligning infection prevention, chronic disease management, and appropriate antibiotic use to promote early recognition of sepsis.

·         Studying risk factors for sepsis that can guide focused prevention and early recognition.

·         Developing tracking for sepsis to measure impact of successful interventions.

·         Preventing infections that may lead to sepsis by promoting vaccination programs, chronic disease management, infection prevention, and appropriate antibiotic use.

To read the entire Vital Signs report visit: www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/sepsis.

For more information on sepsis and CDC’s work visit: www.cdc.gov/sepsis.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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CDC works 24/7 protecting America’s health, safety and security. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are curable or preventable, chronic or acute, stem from human error or deliberate attack, CDC is committed to respond to America’s most pressing health challenges.

 

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C.diff Spores and More Discuss Current C.difficile Infection Objectives For Hospitals Within the United Kingdom With James McIlroy, Founder of EuroBiotix CIC

 

Listen To The JUNE 7, 2016 Podcast

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To access the live broadcast and Podcast Library
C. diff. Spores and More  Global Broadcasting Network
please click on the logo above *

C. diff. Spores and More,” Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program discusses

This Episode:      “EuroBiotix CIC – Supporting Clinicians Within the UK Deliver Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) To Patients With Recurrent C.difficile Infection”

With Our Guest:              James Mcllory

Listen to the PodCast available from the JUNE 7TH  C.diff Spores and More episode as we discussed current C.difficile infection objectives for hospitals within the United Kingdom with James McIlroy, a medical student and founder of a not-for-profit stool bank based within the University of Aberdeen in Scotland

MORE ABOUT OUR GUEST:

James McIlroy is a senior medical student at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. Previously, he earned his Bachelors in Medical Sciences with Honors in human Physiology at the University of Edinburgh. At the present time, James is undertaking a prestigious fellowship at the Royal Society of Edinburgh. During his time at medical school, James identified an unmet need for safe access to fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) within the United Kingdom. He subsequently established a not-for-profit community interest company called EuroBiotix CIC, which seeks to support clinicians within the UK National Health Service provide FMT.

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C. diff. Spores and More ™“ Global Broadcasting Network spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives,C. diff. survivors, board members, and C Diff Foundation volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the C. diff. community worldwide.

Through their interviews, the C Diff Foundation mission will connect, educate, and empower many worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of
Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

To access the C. diff. Spores and More program page and library, please click on the following link:    www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

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Programming for C. diff. Spores and More ™  is made possible through our official  Sponsor;  Clorox Healthcare

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Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) Infection (CDI) Rates In the United States and Across the Globe Have Increased In the Last Decade, Along With Associated Morbidity and Mortality

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Early Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment of Clostridium difficile: Update

Prepared for:
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD 20857
March 2016

 

Clostridium difficile is a gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium generally associated through ingestion. Various strains of the bacteria may produce disease generating toxins
and TedA and TedB, as well as the lesser understood binary toxin.

Our use of the term indicates this review’s focus is the presence of clinical disease rather than asymptomatic carriage of C. difficile CDI symptoms can range from mild diarrhea to severe cases including pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon and death.

Estimated U.S. health care associated CDI incidence in 2011 was 95.3 per 100,000, or about
293,000 cases nationally. Incidence is higher among females, whites, and persons 65 years of
age or older. (1)

About one third to one half of health-care onset CDI cases begin in long term care,thus residents in these facilities are at high risk.  Incidence rates may increase by four or five-fold during outbreaks.

Community associated CDI, where CDI occurs outside the institutional setting,
is also on the rise, though still generally lower than institution associated rates and may be in part due to increased surveillance. Estimated community associated CDI was 51.9 per 100,000, or   159,700 cases in 2011.  (1)

Community-associated CDI complicates measuring the effectiveness of  prevention within an institutional setting. 3  Additionally, the pathogenesis of CDI is complex and not
completely understood, and onset may occur as late as several months after hospitalization or antibiotic use

The estimated mortality rate for health -care associated CDI ranged from 2.4 to 8.9 deaths per

100,000 population in 2011.(1) For individuals ≥65 years of age, the mortality rate
was 55.1 deaths per 100,000; (1)

CDI was the 17th leading cause of death in this age group (4)
Hypervirulent C. difficile  strains have emerged since 2000 . These affect a wider population

that includes children, pregnant women, and other healthy
adults, many of whom lack standard risk profiles such as previous hospitalization or antibiotic use.(5)

The hypervirulent strains  account for 51 percent of CDI, compared to only 17 percent
of historical isolates. (6)

Time from symptom development to septic shock may be reduced in the hypervirulent strains, making quick diagnosis and proactive treatment regimens critical for positive outcomes.

To read more on  TREATMENT, PREVENTION, KEY QUESTIONS ——

https://www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/ehc/products/604/2208/c-difficile-update-report-160329.pdf

Early Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment of Clostridium difficile: Update

Prepared for:
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD 20857
March 2016

 

Sources:

1Appendix J. References for Appendixes
1.Alcala L, Reigadas E, Marin M, et al.
Comparison of GenomEra C. difficile and Xpert
C. difficile as confirmatory tests in a multistep
algorithm for diagnosis of Clostridium difficile
infection.
J Clin Microbiol 2015 Jan;53(1):332
5. PMID: 25392360.
2.Barkin JA, Nandi N, Miller N, et al.
Super iority
of the DNA amplification assay for the
diagnosis of C. difficile infection: a clinical
comparison of fecal tests.
Dig Dis Sci 2012Oct;57(10):2592-
9. PMID: 22576711.
3.Bruins MJ, Verbeek E, Wallinga JA, et al.
Evaluation of three enzyme immunoassay
s and a loo mediated isothermal amplification test
for the laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium
difficile infection. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect
Dis 2012 Nov;31(11):3035 9. PMID:
22706512.
4.Buchan BW, Mackey TL, Daly JA, et al.
Multicenter clinical evalu
ation of the portrait
toxigenic C. difficile assay for detection of
toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains in clinical
stool specimens. J Clin Microbiol 2012
Dec;50(12):3932-
6. PMID: 23015667.
5.Calderaro A, Buttrini M, Martinelli M, et al.
Comparative analysis of different methods to
detect Clostridium difficile infection. New
Microbiol 2013 Jan;36(1):57-
63. PMID:
23435816.
6.Carroll KC, Buchan BW, Tan S, et al.
Multicenter evaluation of the Verigene
Clostridium difficile nucleic acid assay.
J ClinMicrobiol 2013 Dec;51(12):4120-
5. PMID:24088862

“C. diff. Spores and More ™” C diff Radio Returns To Live Broadcasting Tuesday, January 19th

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Welcome to Season 2

C. diff. Spores and More ™”

Join us for live broadcasting  on Tuesday January 19th, 2016 at 10 a.m. Pacific Time,
11 a.m. Mountain Time, 12 p.m. Central Time,   1 p.m. Eastern Time.

 

Programming for Tuesday, January 19th:
“C. difficile Infections; The What, Where and How.”

This episode of “C. diff. Spores and More” is focused on
“C. difficile Infections; The What, Where and How.”
What is it,  What can be done to prevent acquiring it,
Where is it acquired, Where can clinicians and patients
learn more about this infection, How is it being prevented at home
and in the hospitals, How CDI’s are being treated, and How to learn more about the
prevention, treatments, and environmental safety products available
With our special guests:

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Dr. Caterina Oneto,, MD

 

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and Dr. Paul Feuerstadt, MD,
Both professors and physicians specializing in Gastroenterology with
a wealth of knowledge and experience treating patients
with a CDI and through ongoing scientific/medical research.

 

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 Click Image Above to Listen to Archived Shows

 

We are pleased to share  “C. diff. Spores and More ™”  with you because, as advocates
of C. diff., we know the importance of this cutting-edge new weekly radio show
and what it means for our Foundation’s community worldwide.

Hard Facts: Deaths and illnesses are much higher than reports have shown Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released today, February 25, 2015, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common
microbial cause of Healthcare-Associated Infections found in U.S. hospitals
driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute
care facilities alone. Approximately two-thirds of C. diff. infections
were found to be associated with an inpatient stay in a health care facility,
only 24% of the total cases occurred in patients while they were hospitalized.
The study also revealed that almost as many cases occurred in nursing homes as
in hospitals and the remainder of individuals acquired the
Healthcare-Associated infection, C. diff., recently discharged from
a health care facility.

This new study finds that 1 out of every 5 patients with the
Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI), C. diff., experience
a recurrence of the infection and 1 out of every 9 patients over the
age of 65 diagnosed with a HAI – C. diff. infection died
within 30 days of being diagnosed. Older Americans are quite vulnerable
to this life-threatening diarrhea infection. The CDC study also found
that women and Caucasian individuals are at an increased risk of
acquiring a C. diff. infection.
The CDC Director, Dr. Tom Frieden, MD, MPH said, “C. difficile
infections cause immense suffering and death for thousands of Americans
each year.” “These infections can be prevented by improving antibiotic
prescribing and by improving infection control in the health care system.
CDC hopes to ramp up prevention of this deadly infection by supporting
State Antibiotic Resistance Prevention Programs in all 50 states.”

“This does not include the number of C. diff. infections taking place
and being treated in other countries.”  “The  C Diff Foundation supports hundreds
of communities by sharing the Foundation’s mission and
Raising C. diff. awareness to healthcare professionals,patients,
families,  and communities working towards a shared goal ~  witnessing a
reduction of newly diagnosed C. diff. cases by 2020 .”
” The C Diff Foundation volunteer Advocates are truly appreciated and stand
with the Foundation members creating positive changes through
time and dedication in “Raising C. diff. awareness ™”  worldwide.

C. diff. Spores and More ™“ spotlights world
renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals,
organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members,
and C Diff Foundation volunteer advocates  – all working together to
create positive changes in the C. diff. community and more.

Through their interviews, the C Diff Foundation mission will
connect, educate, and empower our worldwide listeners.

Do you have Questions?  Email them to the C Diff Foundation at

info@cdifffoundation.org or through the show page portal.
Questions will be addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,
Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine,
Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency
at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has
been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of Clostridium difficile disease
and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

 

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

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Programming for “C. diff. Spores and More ™”   is made
possible through our official Corporate Sponsor;  Clorox Healthcare™

Click on the Clorox Healthcare Logo to visit their website.

Seal Shield LLC, A Healthcare Technology Company, Introduces SKY™ To Their Family Of UVC Sanitizers, Designed To Kill Bacteria and Viruses On Hard To Clean Consumer Electronics

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Seal Shield LLC (Jacksonville, FL), today will demonstrate the SKY™ family of UV Sanitizers at the CES- Consumer Electronics Show, Sands Booth #73213. 

The SKY™ UVC sanitizers use high intensity, 254 nanometer UVC light, at close proximity of less than 60 thousandths of an inch, to thoroughly disinfect a tablet or smart phone and achieve up to a 6 log reduction in pathogens such as MRSE, VRE, MDR-gram negative, Norovirus and C.diff..

The SKY™ is the world’s first UV Sanitizer to kill more than 99.95% of pathogens in less than 30 seconds. Designed for use in hospitals to protect patients and practitioners from dangerous cross contamination infections, the Sky is also the perfect solution for mobile retailers and IT / MIS professionals who service and support mobile devices of unknown or dubious origins.

Tablet computers and smart phones have been proven to harbor harmful bacteria and viruses. A study published in the Journal of Applied Microbiology warns that “twenty to thirty percent of viruses can be readily transferred from a fingertip to a glass surface, like that on a touch screen.”

“Mobile device hygiene is imperative in today’s pathogen rich environments. SKY™ was designed to be easy to use, and it can safely disinfect virtually any mobile device in under 30 seconds,” states Seal Shield CEO, Brad Whitchurch.

The SKY™ UVC sanitizers use high intensity, 254 nanometer UVC light, at close proximity of less than 60 thousandths of an inch, to thoroughly disinfect a tablet or smart phone and achieve up to a 6 log reduction in pathogens such as MRSE, VRE, MDR-gram negative, Norovirus and C.diff..

The Seal Shield SKY™ is currently available in 2 models.

The SKY™ 6Xi features a horizontal orientation, ideal for desktop applications.

The SKY™ 7Xi features vertical orientation and can be wall mounted or placed on a mobile cart.

The SKY™ sanitizers are the latest additions to Seal Shield’s family of UV infection prevention devices which include the ElectroClave™ and MoonBean™ UV sanitizers.

Seal Shield is a world leader in infection control technology. Seal Shield designs, develops and manufactures medical grade, infection prevention technology for hospitals and the home including UV sanitizers, air purification systems, antimicrobial products, waterproof keyboards, mice and TV remote controls.

 

For more information please visit http://www.SealShield.com/

 

To read article in its entirety:

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-sanitizers-for-smart-phones-and-tablets-can-reduce-the-spread-of-super-bugs-in-under-30-seconds-300199923.html?tc=eml_cleartime&utm_source=NetSuite+Contacts&utm_campaign=f41fd750a2-SKY%2FCES16&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_e25719ba34-f41fd750a2-102891281