Tag Archives: Healthcare Professionals

World Health Organization (WHO) World Antibiotic Awareness Week November 16-22

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The first World Antibiotic Awareness Week will be held from 16 to 22 November 2015. The campaign aims to increase awareness of global antibiotic resistance and to encourage best practices among the general public, health workers and policy makers to avoid the further emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance.

Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI, C. diff. ) for Healthcare Providers

Patients admitted to an ICU for Clostridium difficile infection were at risk for developing subsequent C. difficile infections, according to recent research.

To read this article in its entirety:

http://www.healio.com/infectious-disease/gastrointestinal-infections/news/online/%7Be22ec9f0-c474-4753-9b95-2084d4f9b177%7D/icu-patients-admitted-with-c-difficile-colonization-at-risk-for-subsequent-infections

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Patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) warranting admission to the ICU may benefit from a treatment regimen of combined oral vancomycin and IV metronidazole, according to recent findings.

To read article in its entirety: 

http://www.healio.com/infectious-disease/gastrointestinal-infections/news/online/%7B86429037-44a1-4ac3-9241-b2a8f31d9312%7D/c-difficile-patients-benefit-from-oral-vancomycin-iv-metronidazole-combination

In a retrospective, observational, comparative study, researchers evaluated 88 critically ill adult patients with C. difficile who were admitted to the ICU at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center between June 2007 and September 2012. All patients were treated for CDI with oral vancomycin, and those in the combination therapy group received concomitant metronidazole intravenously for a minimum of 72 hours. Patients were matched and equally placed within either the combination or vancomycin-only groups using the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) metric. The patients were clinically and demographically comparable, although the combination therapy group had a higher prevalence of moderate-to-severe renal disease.

The study’s primary outcome was in-hospital death, and secondary outcomes included clinical success at days 6, 10 and 21; hospital length of stay after diagnosis of CDI; and duration of ICU stay after diagnosis of CDI. Multivariable analysis was used to identify factors independently correlated with survival.

C. diff. Infection Prevention Study: Phase 2 Study SER-109 by Seres Therapeutics; First Patient Dosed for the Prevention of Recurrent C. diff. Infection in Adults

* In The News *

Seres Therapeutics, Inc., a leading microbiome therapeutics platform company, announced on May 28th, 2015 the enrollment and dosing of the first patient in its Phase 2 clinical study of SER-109, an investigational oral microbiome therapeutic for the prevention of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in adults.

The objective of the Phase 2 study is to further assess the efficacy and safety of SER-109, Seres’ leading development candidate.

“Recurrent CDI is a rapidly growing problem in the U.S., and antibiotics are currently the only FDA-approved treatment option,” said Roger Pomerantz, Chairman, President and CEO of Seres. “For many patients, antibiotics may exacerbate the problem by inducing or prolonging an imbalance of the microbiome and creating the conditions that support disease recurrence. We are excited about evaluating the potential of SER-109 to correct the microbiome and address this critical patient need.

“The start of our Phase 2 study is an important milestone for patients, and for Seres.

Our earlier studies suggest that SER-109 is a potentially transformative therapeutic for tens of thousands of patients each year, validating our conviction that treating dysbiosis of the microbiome enables us to address the underlying cause of disease and bring about rapid improvements in health.”

Results from the Phase 1b/2 study of SER-109 in recurrent CDI patients showed that 87 percent of patients met the primary study endpoint and 97 percent of patients achieved a clinical cure, which was defined as the absence of CDI requiring antibiotic treatment during the eight-week period after SER-109 dosing.

The Phase 2 study is a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled study that will evaluate the efficacy and safety of SER-109. The primary outcome measure is the absence of clinically-significant CDI through eight weeks following administration of SER-109 compared to placebo. SER-109 will be administered orally as a single dose, following the standard of care antibiotics for CDI. The study is actively enrolling and will be conducted at approximately 35 centers across the U.S. The read-out from the Phase 2 study is currently expected in the middle of 2016.

About SER-109

SER-109 is the lead Seres Ecobiotic® microbiome therapeutic in clinical testing for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). SER-109 was developed utilizing the Seres Microbiome Therapeutics™ platform that provides deep insight into the ecologies of disease and then identifies microbial compositions that can catalyze a shift to health. CDI is a rapidly growing problem associated with antibiotic use. Approximately 85,000 to 110,000 CDI patients in the U.S. are expected to have more than one recurrence.

About Seres Therapeutics, Inc.

Seres Therapeutics, Inc. is a leading microbiome therapeutics platform company developing a novel class of biological drugs that are designed to treat disease by restoring the function of a dysbiotic microbiome.

 

For article in its entirety:

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/seres-therapeutics-inc-announces-first-113000601.html

 

 

*Please note – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse this product or any product and this posting is strictly for informational purposes only.

C. diff. Survivors Share Their Journey Through a C. diff. Infection (CDI) On C diff Spores and More, C diff Radio

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What’s new in the C Diff Foundation?

Let us introduce you to the first internet radio talk show dedicated to C. diff. and more……

C. diff. Spores and More”

 

UPCOMING SHOW:  Tuesday, May 12th: 

C diff survivors share their unique journey through a C diff infection and how it changed their lives forever

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report published in
February 2015, almost 500,000 C.diff. infections occurred in the U.S. in 2011, with 83,000 recurrences.

Join our guests – all  C. diff. survivor’s – who have been touched by this horrific
and life changing infection.

Heather Clark, Veronica Edmond, Renetta Dudzinski, and Lisa Hurka Covington bravely share their unique journey through a C. diff. infection that forever changed their lives.

 http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

…… we strongly recommend having a box of tissues nearby ………..

 

Listen in live at:     11a Pacific, 12p Mountain, 1p Central, 2p Eastern time

We are so excited to share  C. diff. Spores and More” with you because, as advocates of C. diff., we are very excited about what this cutting-edge new weekly radio show means for our Foundation’s community worldwide.

Fact: Deaths and illnesses are much higher than reports have shown. Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released today, February 25, 2015, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

• More than 100,000 of these infections developed among residents of U.S. nursing homes.

Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of a C. diff. infection. Of these 29,000 – 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly related to a
C. diff. infection. Therefore; C. diff. is an important cause of infectious disease death in the U.S.
Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of Healthcare-Associated Infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone. Approximately
two-thirds of C. diff. infections were found to be associated with an inpatient stay in a health care facility, only 24% of the total cases occurred in patients while they were hospitalized. The study also revealed that almost as many cases occurred in nursing homes as in hospitals and the remainder of individuals acquired the Healthcare-Associated infection, C. diff., recently discharged from a health care facility.

This new study finds that 1 out of every 5 patients with the Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI), C. diff., experience a recurrence of the infection

Older Americans are quite vulnerable to this life-threatening diarrhea infection. The CDC study also found that women and Caucasian individuals are at an increased risk of acquiring a C. diff. infection. The CDC Director, Dr. Tom Frieden, MD, MPH said, “C. difficile infections cause immense suffering and death for thousands of Americans each year.” “These infections can be prevented by improving antibiotic prescribing and by improving infection control in the health care system. CDC hopes to ramp up prevention of this deadly infection by supporting State Antibiotic Resistance Prevention Programs in all 50 states.”

“This does not include the number of C. diff. infections taking place and being treated in other countries.”  “The  CDF supports hundreds of communities by sharing the CDF mission and    raising C. diff. awareness to healthcare professionals, individuals, patients, families,  and communities working towards a shared goal ~  witnessing a reduction of newly diagnosed            C. diff. cases by 2020 .”   ” The CDF Volunteers are greatly appreciated as they create positive changes sharing their time so generously worldwide aiding in the success of our mission and raising C. diff. awareness.”

C. diff. Spores and More” spotlights world renown topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the C. diff. community and more.

Through these interviews, the CDF mission will connect, educate, and empower many in over 180 countries.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

 

Please join us Tuesdays in listening to the educational episodes of C. diff. Spores and More”

View the programs and radio information and access previous episodes available as a podcast by clicking on the link below:

www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

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Healthcare Disinfecting Cell PhoneSoap System

PHONESOAP_CELL_PHONE_CHARGER_UV_SANITIZER_003Cell Phone Soap

Click on the link below to be directed to the PhoneSoap website and learn more about this Cell Phone Disinfecting System Available:

https://www.phonesoap.com/product/healthcare-sanitizing-and-disinfecting/

 

 

PhoneSoap’s UV products are used in hospitals throughout the country

 

UV-C light is already being used in hospitals and clean rooms throughout the world because it has been proven to effectively penetrate and disarm bacteria. The light will sanitize any surface it touches. PhoneSoap has adapted this technology to be portable and accessible to the average health care provider.

 

C. diff. Infection Support and Information Available

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Do you have questions about a                          C. diff.   infection?

Call 1-844-FOR-CDIF  (367-2343)

And speak with a information specialist for          assistance regarding  C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety products available.

 

 

* Disclaimer:  Please do not cease in seeking medical treatment and medical care if any C. diff. symptoms are noticed or continue. Please see your Primary Care Physician or go to the nearest Clinic/ER for medical treatment. The C Diff Foundation does not provide assessments or diagnosis and is not liable for decisions made solely based from the information provided here or through the hotline or archived on the website. The foundation does not provide ancillary assistance with travel, or lodging. Information shared is for educational use only and to raise C. diff.  awareness in prevention, treatments, and environmental safety worldwide.  Thank you

 

Hand-washing (aka hand-hygiene) Helps Stop The Spread Of Germs

HAVE YOU TAKEN A 20 – 30 SECOND HAND-WASHING BREAK?

Correct hand-washing technique keeps you and others safe:

 

  • Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
  • Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  • Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  • Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
  • Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them

WHEN TO WASH YOUR HANDS:

  • Before, during, and after preparing food
  • Before eating food
  • Before and after patient care in any setting
  • Before and after treating a cut or wound
  • After using the toilet and before exiting the restroom
  • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
  • After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste
  • After handling pet food or pet treats
  • After touching garbage
  • After visiting an outpatient setting (Physicians office/Dentist office/Clinic)
  • After shopping
  • Before and after handling food
  • After traveling on public transportation
  • Any any time hands are soiled

 

What is the difference?
Hand hygiene . A general term that applies to either
handwashing, antiseptic handwash, antiseptic hand rub, or
surgical hand antisepsis.
Handwashing . Washing hands with plain (i.e., non-antimi-
crobial) soap and water.
Guideline for Hand Hygiene in Health-Care Settings
Recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices
Advisory Committee and the HICPAC/SHEA/APIC/IDSA
Hand Hygiene Task Force
Vol. 51 / RR-16
Activity of Antiseptic Agents Against
Spore-Forming Bacteria
The widespread prevalence of health-care–associated diarrhea                                                            caused by Clostridium difficile and the recent occurrence
in the United States of human Bacillus anthracis infections                                                                    associated with contaminated items sent through the postal
system has raised concern regarding the activity of antiseptic
agents against spore-forming bacteria. None of the agents
(including alcohols, chlorhexidine, hexachlorophene,
iodophors, PCMX, and triclosan) used in antiseptic handwash
or antiseptic hand-rub preparations are reliably sporicidal
against Clostridium spp. or Bacillus spp. (120,172,224,225).
Washing hands with non-antimicrobial or antimicrobial soap
and water may help to physically remove spores from the sur-
face of contaminated hands. HCWs should be encouraged
to wear gloves when caring for patients with
C. difficile – associated diarrhea (226). After gloves are removed, hands
should be washed with a non-antimicrobial or an antimicro-
bial soap and water or disinfected with an alcohol-based hand
rub. During outbreaks of C. difficile-related infections, washing                                                              hands with a non-antimicrobial or antimicrobial soap and
water after removing gloves is prudent. HCWs with suspected
or documented exposure to B. anthracis-contaminated items also should be encouraged to wash their hands with a non-antimicrobial or antimicrobial soap and water
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