Tag Archives: Hospital-Associated Infections

Bridging Collaboration Between Patients and Healthcare Providers to Reduce Hospital-Acquired Infections

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C. diff. Spores and More” Global Broadcasting Network
will host a special episode on their live radio program (cdiffradio.com)
airing on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 at 1:00 pm EST featuring world-renowned
infectious disease expert, Dr. Hudson Garrett Jr., Global Chief Clinical Officer for Pentax Medical-Hoya Corporation and Chairperson of the Clinical Education Committee
for the C Diff Foundation.

This special episode, Bridging Collaboration Between Patients and Healthcare Providers to Reduce Hospital-Acquired Infections (HAI’s),  will feature a robust discussion on the patient’s role in preventing healthcare associated infections, an overview of medical device hygiene and infection control, the importance of antibiotic stewardship, and applications of evidence-based infection control measures across the entire healthcare continuum of care.

“Healthcare continues to become more and more complex as the acuity and needs of the patient changes along with the correlating technologies. Patients and Healthcare Providers must work together to mitigate the risk for Healthcare Associated Infections and other adverse events,” says Dr. Garrett.

C. diff. Spores and More ™“ spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the
C. diff.
community and more.

Through the interviews, the C Diff Foundation’s mission connects, educates, and empowers listeners worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

 

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Clorox Healthcare, Sponsor of C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network

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U.S. Panel To the Food and Drug Administration Voted 10-5 In Favor For Merck & Co. ‘s bezlotoxumab Effective At Preventing A Recurrence Of C. diff. Infection

NewsUpdate

 Merck & Co’s experimental drug to treat the most common hospital-associated infectious diarrhea
* Clostridium difficile  *  warrants approval, an advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Thursday.

 

The panel voted 10-5, with one abstention, that the drug, bezlotoxumab, was effective in preventing a recurrence of infection with Clostridium difficile, or C. difficile, a germ that causes inflammation of the colon and potentially fatal diarrhea.

The FDA is not obliged to follow the advice of its advisory panels but typically does.

The panel’s vote follows an internal review by FDA staff which found an apparent decrease in recurrence of C. difficile but expressed concern as to whether the drug could hurt the cure rate of the initial C. difficile episode.

Panelists who voted in favor of the drug acknowledged the FDA’s concerns but said they were persuaded there was a need for new targeted therapies and this one seems effective.

“We haven’t had a new drug for C. difficile in our armamentarium for some time,” Dr. Joanna Schaenman, assistant professor of medicine at UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, said.

MORE about bezlotoxumab :   https://cdifffoundation.org/category/clinical-trials/

Merck & Co.   bezlotoxumab was successful in two Phase III trials against the recurrence of

Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection when combined with antibiotics.

Currently, there are no therapies approved for the prevention of recurrent disease caused by C. difficile.

Bezlotoxumab’s approval would also make it the first antibody to treat bacterial infection.

Scientists say mAbs would have benefits over small molecule antibiotics because they are less likely to drive antimicrobial resistance and are administered less frequently. “Results of these studies showed that a single, one-time infusion of the antitoxin bezlotoxumab given with standard of care C. difficile antibiotic treatment significantly reduced the recurrence of C. difficile infection compared to standard of care alone, and demonstrated this benefit over a 12-week period,” said lead investigator Mark Wilcox of the University of Leeds, UK. “These results were also demonstrated in patient subgroups known to be at high risk for C. difficile recurrence.”

C. difficile toxin B can damage the gut wall and cause inflammation, leading to the symptoms of C. difficile enteritis, which include abdominal pain and watery diarrhea. Bezlotoxumab, a fully-human monoclonal antibody, was developed by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s MassBiologics Laboratory with Medarex (now part of Bristol-Myers Squibb), and licensed to Merck in 2009.

The studies   Merck’s studies took more than 1,000 patients each and evaluated them over 12 weeks. Participants received either a single infusion of bezlotoxumab, actoxumab (another mAb designed to fight C. difficile),a combination of the two, or a placebo. The actoxumab arm of the study ended early for efficacy and safety reasons.    Both studies had infection recurrence as their primary endpoint – this rate was significantly lower for the bezlotoxumab arms (17.4% and 15.7%) and bezlotoxumab plus actoxumab arms (15.9% and 14.9%), compared to placebos (27.6% and 25.7%). Actoxumab was found not to provide extra benefit on its own or combined with bezlotoxumab, so Merck’s marketing authorisation application is for bezlotoxumab alone.

The FDA is due to make its decision by July 23.

 

TO READ ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW:

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/health/us-regulatory-panel-backs/2860152.html

Xenex Germ Zapping Robot Cleans House To Protect A Pediatric Patient From Deadly Infections

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To view video – click on the link below

http://wdtn.com/2015/11/23/robot-protects-8-year-old-with-brain-tumor-from-deadly-infection/

 

1.7-million Americans will pick up infections at the hospital this year, often antibiotic resistant superbugs hard to disinfect, that can potentially be fatal.

That has apparently happened to an eight-year-old Westlake boy. During the time he was receiving chemotherapy for his brain cancer, he got C. diff. , a superbug that kills one in ten people who get it, and lingers on surfaces for months. But Aydan Chapman is safely home now, his entire house disinfected by a superbug zapping robot.

The San Antonio based company Xenex recently sold its disinfecting robots to St. Davids in Austin. Within minutes, they can disinfect a hospital room for anything from Ebola, C. diff.  MRSA, norovirus, even Anthrax.

Also this fall, Aydan Chapman learned that he had acquired c-Diff, around the time of his chemo treatment at Dell Children’s Medical Center. Dell confirmed the infection. Aydan had already endured four brain tumors since 2009, now he is enduring chemo and strong antibiotics for the superbug.

Bryce Chapman, Aydan’s father, is hearing impaired but told KXAN through a Community Service for the Deaf sign reader, “It was extremely frustrating to see what was happening with him. It was actually two to three weeks before we learned he had the c-Diff, so he had gone through so much at this point. It felt like he was getting hit by more than one thing.”

UVC Emitting Robot
While effective against germs the UVC rays are also dangerous for humans; rooms must be emptied before the robot can begin cleaning.

Xenex learned of what happened. In four short years, they have sold the UVC emitting robots to 300 hospitals, including M.D. Anderson, the Dallas Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas where an Ebola patient died, to the UCLA Medical Center, and others. But occasionally they do pro bono work in homes and high schools. Friday they disinfected Aydan’s home, zapping it from top to bottom in one afternoon.

Xenex vice president Ryan N. Williams believes hospitals too often shortchange their cleaning efforts, “Hospitals are not doing the best they can to be able to eliminate these infections. The incidents of these superbugs and resistant bacteria in the environment has been on the rise. Traditional cleaning and the incidents of human error and oversight is just not good enough.”Aydan, a third grader, homeschools for now but he and his family rest easier knowing that while he continues his chemo, c-Diff may be the least of his worries. His dad says, Yes, it’s absolutely given us peace of mind. Definitely. Now we know our house is peaceful and clean for Aydan.” When asked how he is feeling these days, Aydan tells KXAN “I don’t know how to explain it.” He nodded when asked if he misses school, “I don’t get to see my friends and I don’t get to do the regular things I do at school.” His favorite part of school? “Recess, and math. Because I’m really good at it.” He smiles.

Taking a deeper look at the growing problem of hospital infections, c-Diff is the most common infection caught in American hospitals. It leads to 14,000 deaths a year. In a major study, the University of Texas College of Pharmacy found c-Diff infections doubled in the U.S. between 2001 and 2010, rising from 4.5 patients per thousand visits to 8.2 patients.
Just last year President Obama signed an executive order calling for a national strategy to combat antibiotic resistant bacteria, the so-called superbugs

 

To read article in its entirety click on the following link:

http://wdtn.com/2015/11/23/robot-protects-8-year-old-with-brain-tumor-from-deadly-infection/