Tag Archives: How can C.diff. be spread?

Monday, April 27th – 6:00 p.m. EST Leading Gastroenterologist’s Caterina Oneto, MD & Paul Feuerstadt, MD Host C. diff. Global TeleSupport Network

MONDAY,  April 27th   –  6:00 p.m. EST
Hosts and Co-Directors

Doctors Caterina Oneto, MD &
Paul Feuerstadt, MD

 

Topic:  Doctors Oneto and Feuerstadt will discuss C. difficile Infections; The What, Where and How.  There will be opportunities to ask a  brief question to the physicians.  We appreciate Dr.’s Oneto and Dr. Feuerstadt for donating their time to discuss C. difficile Infections and to provide information regarding prevention, treatments available, and environmental safety products available.   Join Dr. Oneto and Dr. Feuerstadt’s session hosted on the fourth Monday of each month.
Via: Teleconference Call:  1 – 646 -927 – 0297   Conference ID:  123560#
3:00 p.m. PT     4:00 p.m. MT     5:00 p.m. CT    6:00 p.m ET

NOTE:  The Physicians will not prescribe, diagnose, or provide medical assessment answers to any individuals participating in their support session.  Please contact the Physician providing care for a C. diff. Infection or other diagnoses that are being treated.    Thank you.

 

SUPPORT IS JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY

Support and information sessions are for everyone especially for —

  • Families.
  • Clinicians,
  • C. diff. survivors continuing their recovery from a prolonged illness.
  • Patients working their way through any long-term wellness draining diagnosis.

All Sessions are FREE and accessible from the USA and 57 countries  *

Support is available to anyone seeking additional information with the desire to speak with others that understand the journey.

  • PLEASE NOTE *  If you, or anyone you know, are experiencing mental or physical symptoms causing pain, fever, discomfort, C. difficile symptoms or changes in a diagnosed infection, or a change in emotional behavior or having suicidal thoughts, DO NOT wait for a scheduled support session.  Contact a physician or seek medical attention at a local clinic or hospital immediately. Thank you.

The C. diff. Global TeleSupport Network program is the first-ever FREE GLOBAL patient and family educational support program developed by a U.S. non-profit 501(c)(3) — The C Diff Foundation is dedicated to educating and advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, clinical trials, support, and environmental safety worldwide.

Community-acquired C. diff. Infection (CA-CDI)

How is Clostridioides difficile epidemiology changing?

 

What risk factors are associated with community-acquired C. diff (CA-CDI)?

How has molecular epidemiology improved our understanding of Cdiff transmission?

What are the potential novel sources of Cdiff?

Investigators with Duke University Medical Center certainly asked the right questions in “Novel and Emerging Sources of Clostridioides difficile Infection,” a new study published December 19 in PLOS Pathogens.

The global answer is that infection preventionists and other infection control professionals will have their work cut out for them in the coming year. They’ll have to contend with diversity among C. diff isolates, mounting evidence that it’s often transmitted outside the hospital, and that those multiple sources of infection will put current infection control processes to the test. Coming up with the best approach will take lots of exposure-related data, coupled with whole-genome sequencing.

“With the additional issues of widespread outpatient healthcare contact, asymptomatic carriage, and long-term environmental persistence of spores, even the basic distinction between community- versus healthcare-associated CDI may become less relevant with time,” the study states.

Mathematical modeling studies suggest reducing transmission would require that patients with C. diff be placed in single rooms and the healthcare workers who care for them wear gowns and gloves. Clinical data supporting this method are missing, however. “Molecular epidemiologic studies attribute a relatively small minority of transmission events to carriers,” the study states.

It’s more of a challenge to investigate CA-CDI than healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). There aren’t even that many population-based studies on CDI incidence, say, investigators.

Which population is most at risk?

And how does the healthcare system go about tracking it?

These questions have not been answered and don’t look to be answered anytime soon.

“One of the major issues with defining populations at risk for CA-CDI is a lack of centralized testing or surveillance,” the study states. “Because patients are able to present to urgent care, primary care offices, emergency rooms, and hospitals, often all belonging to different healthcare networks, it is extremely difficult to determine how many cases are occurring within a particular community.”

The fact that most C. diff interventions occur within the hospital also limits what can be done about CA-CDI. It’s also unclear just how the infection travels: from the community into the hospital, the other way around, or some combination of both?

Also, “even though healthcare contact is frequently associated with CA-CDI, it remains unclear if this reflects patients who are actually at elevated risk because of multiple chronic health problems or if contact with healthcare is truly what is driving the risk.”

Nursing homes and long-term care facilities seem to be breeding grounds for C. diff and may be a major source of C. diff infection in hospitals because many of the residents in those latter facilities often wind up in the hospital.

“With the additional issues of widespread outpatient healthcare contact, asymptomatic carriage, and long-term environmental persistence of spores, even the basic distinction between community- versus healthcare-associated CDI may become less relevant with time.

Given the challenges posed by current evidence of interspecies transmission and environmental reservoirs of Cdifficile, future research in C. difficile prevention will require an integrative multidisciplinary approach, as exemplified by the OneHealth concept.”

To view this article in its entirety, please click on the following link to be redirected.  Thank You.

https://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/hai-types/c-diff-conundrum-sources-harder-pin-down-making-control-difficult

Study Finds C.diff. Infections Could Be Reduced by 13% In Hospital Transfers

“We defined a patient transfer as a patient discharged from one hospital and then admitted to another hospital on the same day.”

The study findings reinforce that infection prevention and control strategies should be conducted at the regional level to better minimize the spread of HAIs, Sewell and colleagues said.

Study findings showed that hospital transfers cause a “minority but substantial burden” of Clostridioides difficile infections in California and that the burden could be reduced by 13% statewide if contamination from hospital transfers was eliminated.

Hospital transfers are known to be associated with the spread of pathogens like C. difficile and MRSA, but researchers said it is critical to better understand the role that hospital transfers play in the spread of hospital-acquired infections, or HAIs.

“The relationship between hospital transfers and higher levels of HAIs is unclear, as is the public health significance of this relationship,” Daniel K. Sewell, PhD, assistant professor of biostatistics in the University of Iowa College of Public Health, and colleagues wrote.

They conducted a retrospective observational study using data collected between 2005 and 2011 from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project California State Inpatient Database.

“We were able to discern transfers between hospitals by considering patients who had common discharge and admission dates involving two distinct hospitals,” Sewell and colleagues wrote. “We defined a patient transfer as a patient discharged from one hospital and then admitted to another hospital on the same day.”

According to the study, Sewell and colleagues identified 26,878,498 admissions and 532,925 patient transfers across 385 hospitals. They found that 13% of C. difficile infections (CDIs) were a result of patient transfers (95% CI, 7.6%-18%). Additionally, the researchers observed CDI cases increase at receiving hospitals when the number of transfer patients increased or when the CDI rate at the transferring hospital increased, or both.

“Transfers of patients demonstrate the interconnectedness of health care systems,” they wrote. “Accordingly, efforts to control the spread of infections at one facility may benefit others, and the less rigorous infection control efforts at some hospitals may impact the infection rates at other hospitals within a transfer network.” – by Marley Ghizzone

 

 

 

 

To review article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

 

https://www.healio.com/infectious-disease/nosocomial-infections/news/online/%7B7bc8ae6c-fcc3-4ca6-a625-29301eb6535a%7D/eliminating-contamination-from-hospital-transfers-could-reduce-cdi-cases-by-13