Tag Archives: Recurrent Clostridium difficile treatment

U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Has Approved Merck’s (MSD) ZINPLAVA ™ (bezlotoxumab) Injection 25mg/ml To Reduce Recurrence Of Clostridium difficile Infection In Patients 18 Years Of Age Or Older

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Merck  known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, on October 22, 2016 announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved ZINPLAVA™ (bezlotoxumab) Injection 25 mg/mL.

Merck anticipates making ZINPLAVA available in first quarter 2017.

ZINPLAVA is indicated to reduce recurrence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients 18 years of age or older who are receiving antibacterial drug treatment of CDI and are at high risk for CDI recurrence.

ZINPLAVA is not indicated for the treatment of CDI.

ZINPLAVA is not an antibacterial drug. ZINPLAVA should only be used in conjunction with antibacterial drug treatment of CDI.

Please see Prescribing Information for ZINPLAVA (bezlotoxumab) at http://www.merck.com/product/usa/pi_circulars/z/zinplava/zinplava_pi.pdf 

 

Patient Information for ZINPLAVA at http://www.merck.com/product/usa/pi_circulars/z/zinplava/zinplava_ppi.pdf

CDI is caused by bacteria that produce toxins, including toxin B. Symptoms of CDI include mild-to-severe diarrhea, abdominal pain and fever. The incidence of recurrent CDI is higher in certain patient populations, including people 65 years of age or older and those with compromised immune systems.

“For generations, Merck has been steadfast in its commitment to fighting infectious diseases – and that commitment continues today. ZINPLAVA is a human monoclonal antibody that binds to C. difficile toxin B and neutralizes its effects,” said Dr. Nicholas Kartsonis, vice president of clinical development, infectious diseases, Merck Research Laboratories.

Selected safety information about ZINPLAVA

Heart failure was reported more commonly in the two Phase 3 clinical trials in ZINPLAVA-treated patients compared to placebo-treated patients. These adverse reactions occurred primarily in patients with underlying congestive heart failure (CHF). In patients with a history of CHF, 12.7% (15/118) of ZINPLAVA-treated patients and 4.8% (5/104) of placebo-treated patients had the serious adverse reaction of heart failure during the 12-week study period. Additionally, in patients with a history of CHF, there were more deaths in ZINPLAVA-treated patients [19.5% (23/118)] than in placebo-treated patients [12.5% (13/104)] during the 12-week study period. The causes of death varied, and included cardiac failure, infections, and respiratory failure. In patients with a history of CHF, ZINPLAVA (bezlotoxumab) should be reserved for use when the benefit outweighs the risk.

The most common adverse reactions occurring within 4 weeks of infusion with a frequency greater than placebo and reported in ≥4% of patients treated with ZINPLAVA and Standard of Care (SoC) antibacterial drug therapy vs placebo and SoC antibacterial drug therapy included nausea (7% vs 5%), pyrexia (5% vs 3%) and headache (4% vs 3%).

Serious adverse reactions occurring within 12 weeks following infusion were reported in 29% of ZINPLAVA-treated patients and 33% of placebo-treated patients. Heart failure was reported as a serious adverse reaction in 2.3% of ZINPLAVA-treated patients and 1.0% of placebo-treated patients.

In ZINPLAVA-treated patients, 10% experienced one or more infusion specific adverse reactions compared to 8% of placebo-treated patients, on the day of or the day after, the infusion. Infusion specific adverse reactions reported in ≥0.5% of patients receiving ZINPLAVA and at a frequency greater than placebo were nausea (3%), fatigue (1%), pyrexia (1%), dizziness (1%), headache (2%), dyspnea (1%) and hypertension (1%). Of these patients, 78% experienced mild adverse reactions, and 20% of patients experienced moderate adverse reactions. These reactions resolved within 24 hours following onset.

As with all therapeutic proteins, there is a potential for immunogenicity following administration of ZINPLAVA. The detection of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Additionally, the observed incidence of antibody (including neutralizing antibody) positivity in an assay may be influenced by several factors including assay methodology, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medications, and underlying disease. For these reasons, comparison of the incidence of antibodies to bezlotoxumab in two Phase 3 studies with the incidence of antibodies in other studies or to other products may be misleading. Following treatment with ZINPLAVA in these two studies, none of the 710 evaluable patients tested positive for treatment-emergent anti-bezlotoxumab antibodies.

About bezlotoxumab

Bezlotoxumab was developed by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s MassBiologics Laboratory in conjunction with Medarex (now part of Bristol-Myers Squibb), and was licensed to Merck in 2009.

Please see Prescribing Information for ZINPLAVA (bezlotoxumab) at http://www.merck.com/product/usa/pi_circulars/z/zinplava/zinplava_pi.pdf 

 

About Merck

For 125 years, Merck has been a global health care leader working to help the world be well. Merck is known as MSD outside the United States and Canada. Through our prescription medicines, vaccines, biologic therapies, and animal health products, we work with customers and operate in more than 140 countries to deliver innovative health solutions. We also demonstrate our commitment to increasing access to health care through far-reaching policies, programs and partnerships.

For more information, visit www.merck.com

To read this article in its entirety please click on the following link

http://www.pharmiweb.com/PressReleases/pressrel.asp?ROW_ID=187373#.WAsjR8li9kk

 

*Please note – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse any product and/or clinical study in progress. All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only.

C. diff. Prevention of Recurrent C. diff. Infection (RCDI), Seres Therapeutics Announces Achievement of Target Enrollment of SER-109 Phase 2 Study

In The News: May 2, 2016

Seres Therapeutics Announces Achievement of Target Enrollment of SER-109 Phase 2 Study for the Prevention of Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

Phase 2 data expected in mid-2016

New SER-109 Expanded Access Program initiated at Phase 2 clinical sites

Seres Therapeutics, Inc.  a leading microbiome therapeutics platform company, announced that the target enrollment of 87 patients has been achieved for its ongoing SER-109 Phase 2 clinical study.

SER-109 is an oral, potential first-in-field microbiome therapeutic that has been granted Orphan Drug and Breakthrough Therapy designations by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and is being investigated for use in preventing recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI).

“We are pleased to reach this important milestone in our ongoing development of SER-109, which has the potential to be the first therapy for C. difficile infection to treat the underlying cause of this disease, and the first microbiome drug for a human disease. This is the first placebo controlled trial for patients with multiply-recurrent CDI,” said Roger Pomerantz, M.D., Chairman, President, and CEO of Seres. “C. difficile infection is an extremely serious condition responsible for approximately 29,000 deaths each year in the United States alone. We are moving with urgency to develop SER-109 as quickly and safely as possible. We expect initial results of the Phase 2 study in the middle of this year, and we plan to initiate a Phase 3 study later in 2016.”

The SER-109 Phase 2 study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02437487) is a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled study being conducted at approximately 40 centers across the U.S. The current study builds on a completed, successful Phase 1b/2 trial, which demonstrated that 87 percent of patients (26 of 30) met the predefined endpoint of preventing recurrent CDI within eight weeks following administration of SER-109. In that study 97 percent of patients (29 of 30) achieved a clinical cure during the eight-week period after SER-109 dosing, as defined by the absence of CDI requiring antibiotic treatment. Results from the Phase 1b/2 have been published in The Journal of Infectious Disease.1

The Company has initiated a SER-109 Expanded Access Program at selected sites participating in the ongoing Phase 2 study. The Expanded Access Program will enable eligible patients with multiply-recurrent CDI to have continued access to SER-109. Furthermore, maintaining Phase 2 study sites open ahead of the anticipated start of the Phase 3 study expected to support and augment Phase 3 study execution and enrollment.

About Seres Therapeutics
Seres Therapeutics, Inc. is a leading microbiome therapeutics platform company developing a novel class of biological drugs that are designed to treat disease by restoring the function of a dysbiotic microbiome, where the natural state of bacterial diversity and function is imbalanced. Seres’ most advanced program, SER-109, has successfully completed a Phase 1b/2 study demonstrating a clinical benefit in patients with recurring Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and is currently being evaluated in a Phase 2 study in recurring CDI. The FDA has granted SER-109 Orphan Drug, as well as Breakthrough Therapy, designations. Seres’ second clinical candidate, SER-287, is being evaluated in a Phase 1b study in patients with mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis (UC). For more information, please visit www.serestherapeutics.com. Follow us on Twitter @SeresTx.

TO READ THE ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW:

http://ir.serestherapeutics.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=254006&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=2163658

Reference

1. Khanna S. et al., A novel microbiome therapeutic increases gut microbial diversity and prevents recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, Journal of Infectious Disease, 2016.

Note:  The C Diff Foundation does not endorse this product, or any product, and shares this article strictly for informational purposes.

 

 

Glenn Taylor, Head Microbiologist At the Taymount Clinic UK Discusses Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT) To Treat a Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI) on C diff Spores and More #CdiffRadio

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On Tuesday, March 8th  our guest, Glenn Taylor — Head Microbiologist –  joined us to discuss

“Taymount Clinic; Pioneering Fecal Microbiota Transplant ‘FMT’ For Digestive Problems”

CLICK ON THE Cdiff radio LOGO BELOW TO ACCESS THE PODCAST OF THIS EPISODE **

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Our guest, Glenn Taylor – Microbiologist at the Taymount Clinic just outside London in the UK, joined us to discuss this important topic.   Glenn has spent more than five years researching the commensal colonization of bacteria in the human digestive system. The Taymount Clinics are known internationally as a specialist center for the production of tested, certified, high quality gut bacteria and effective, efficient implant techniques Researching intestinal bacteria since 2006, the Taymount Clinic is now a recognized world leader in applying Fecal / Faecal Microbiota Transplant or FMT treatment procedures to create a “normal” bacterial environment in patients with a broad range of conditions. The Taymount clinic provides FMT treatment to normalize gut bacteria in patients with a Clostridium difficile infection.

For additional information visit the Taymount Clinic website:  www.taymount.com

C. diff. Spores and More™  Global Broadcasting Network –  producing educational programs dedicated to  C. difficile Infections and more —  brought to you by VoiceAmerica and sponsored by Clorox Healthcare