Tag Archives: What is Sepsis?

C. diff. Infection and Sepsis Overview During a One Year Follow Up

Sepsis was a common Clostridioides difficile infection (C diff) complication throughout a 12-month follow-up period and was most commonly observed in the cohort of patients with 3 or more C diff infection recurrences, according to a paper published in SAGE Open Medicine.

Investigators from around New England conducted a retrospective analysis of more than 46,000 adult patients with C diff infection in order to evaluate the clinical complications of C diff in patients with index and recurrent cases. The investigators used the IQVIA PharMetrics Plus database to looks for patients aged 18-64 years with an index C diff episode that required inpatient stay or an outpatient visit, followed by a treatment for the infection. Treatments included vancomycin, fidaxomicin, metronidazole, rifaximin, or bezlotoxumab, or fecal microbiota transplant (FMT – though it was rare).

Each infection ended after a 14-day C diff-free period was observed, leaving recurrent C diff to be defined as further infection within an 8-week window for a period of 12 months.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.hcplive.com/view/sepsis-among-common-c-diff-complications-during-one-year-follow-up-period

A total of 3129 patients (6.7%) experienced 1 recurrence, while 1% had 2 recurrences, and 0.3% had 3 or more recurrences. The study authors also noted that autoimmune diseases, such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis, were present in 18%, 23%, 24%, and nearly 40% of patients, respectively, in patients with 0, 1, 2, or 3 or more C diff infection recurrences.

Antibiotics were prescribed for three-quarters of all patients in all groups in the 6 months preceding the index C diff infection, the investigators found. Gastric acid-suppressing agents were prescribed in 28%, 33%, 39%, and 38%, respectively, in patients with 0, 1, 2, or 3 or more C diff infection recurrences, the study authors also noted.

Vancomycin was used to treat about a third of all index C diff infection patients, while metronidazole was used to treat a little more than half of the patients, the study authors wrote. Fidaxomicin was used to treat about 4% of patients. Vancomycin was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic used in recurrent C diff cases, with 55% of patients getting the antibiotic for the first recurrence, 56% getting it for their second recurrence, and 60% getting it for their third recurrence.

During the 12-month follow-up period, the investigators observed sepsis in 16%, 27%, 33%, and 43%, respectively, in patients with 0, 1, 2, or 3 or more C diff infection recurrences. No patient had more than 2 sepsis episodes during the 12-month follow-up period. Additionally, subtotal colectomy or diverting loop ileostomy was performed in 4%, 7%, 9%, and 10% of patients, respectively, in patients with 0, 1, 2, or 3 or more C diff infection recurrences.

“Our findings indicate that, among patients with more recurrent C diff infection, there was a parallel trend for higher rates of colectomy and sepsis,” the study authors wrote.

The study authors also said that patients with 3 or more recurrences also had the highest health care resource utilization and total, all-cause, direct medical costs of all the recurrence cohorts. Sepsis was highest among this group with the most recurrences, and the study authors hypothesized that this was due to having more opportunities to suffer from this type of adverse outcome.

“Reduction in recurrent C diff infection may be an important step to reduce the burden of serious clinical complications,” they concluded.

Sepsis Resources: 

https://www.global-sepsis-alliance.org/

https://www.sepsis.org/

 

The World Health Assembly and the World Health Organization Adopts Resolution To Improve Sepsis Prevention, Diagnosis, and Management

Congratulations!

On Friday, May 26th, 2017, the World Health Assembly and the World Health Organization made sepsis a global health priority, by adopting a resolution to improve, prevent, diagnose, and manage sepsis. This marks a quantum leap in the global fight against sepsis.

Sepsis, commonly referred to as ‘blood poisoning’, is the life-threatening condition that arises when the body’s response to infection results in organ dysfunction or failure.  Sepsis is often confused with other conditions in its early stages, with delayed recognition of the signs and symptoms quickly leading to multi-system organ failure and ultimately death.

The resolution urges the 194 United Nation Member States to implement appropriate measures to reduce the human and health economic burden of sepsis. In the USA alone, sepsis causes or contributes to half of all deaths in hospitals and has become the leading cause of annual hospitals costs, at over 24 billion USD per year.

The resolution also requests the Director-General of the WHO, Dr. Margaret Chan, to draw attention to the public health impact of sepsis and to 1) publish a report on sepsis and its global consequences by the end of 2018, 2) support the Member States adequately, 3) collaborate with other UN organizations, and 4) report to the 2020 WHA on the implementation of this resolution.

“Community-acquired and health care-acquired sepsis represent a huge global burden that has been estimated to be 31 million cases every year, six million of which result in death,” said Dr. Chan. “One in ten patients world-wide acquires one health care associated infection which often manifests itself with sepsis conditions. I commend the member states for the content of the resolution on sepsis which point to key actions that need to be taken to reverse these shocking statistics.”

The WHO has allocated $4.6 million USD to help implement their sepsis resolution.

The adoption of sepsis as a global priority was initiated by the Global Sepsis Alliance who gathered the consensus and authority of clinicians and families from over 70 countries.

“Worldwide, sepsis is one of the most common deadly diseases, and it is one of the few conditions to strike with equal ferocity in resource-poor areas and in the developed world,” said Dr. Konrad Reinhart, Chairman of the Global Sepsis Alliance.  “In the developed world, sepsis is dramatically increasing by an annual rate of 5-13 per cent over the last decade, and now claims more lives than bowel and breast cancer combined.  When sepsis is quickly recognized and treated, lives are saved but health care providers need better training because they are the critical link to preventing, recognizing, and treating sepsis.”

 

Learn more  by accessing the GSA link:

https://www.global-sepsis-alliance.org/news/2017/5/26/wha-adopts-resolution-on-sepsis