Tag Archives: World Health Organization

SAVE LIVES: Clean YOUR Hands WHO Global Annual Campaign Kicks Off On May 5th

“Clean care for all – it’s in your hands” — this year’s slogan

SAVE LIVES: Clean YOUR Hands  global annual campaign kicks off on May 5th.

As the World Health Organization shared in their newsletter;   “Being “campaign active” is an important part of improving hand hygiene and Infection Prevention and Control (IPC)  in health care.”

 

 

“Health facilities should always be places of healing. No one should get sick while seeking care. Achieving universal health coverage means quality care for everyone, everywhere. And quality care is clean care. We all have a part to play; hand hygiene is one of the most basic elements of infection prevention and control.” Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General, advocacy video (https://youtu.be/nw9TMfqc3cE).

The following WHO campaign resources are now available on the 5 May 2019 web page (https://www.who.int/infection-prevention/campaigns/clean-hands/5may2019/en/)

Visit the WHO website to gain access to the resources available and being “campaign active” to share the high levels of the importance of this life-saving intervention across the globe.

 

Global Antibiotic Research and Development Partnership (GARDP) – GARDP is a non-profit research and development organization initiated by WHO and the Drugs for Neglected Disease initiative, that addresses global public health needs by developing and delivering new or improved antibiotic treatments, while endeavouring to ensure their sustainable access. GARDP recently launched the COHERENCE (COmbination tHERapy to treat sepsis due to carbapenem-resistant Gram negative bacteria in adult and paediatric population: EvideNCE and common practice) project. As a first activity, COHERENCE launched a survey assessing the prescription habits and attitudes of clinicians who normally deal with the treatment of carbapenem-resistant Gram negative bacteria in adult and paediatric populations worldwide. Please promote the survey and participate here (https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/GARDP-COHERENCE)! By completing the survey, you will have a chance to win a complimentary registration for the 2020 ECCMID Congress in Paris.

News from stakeholders:
European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)
In support of 5 May hand hygiene campaign activities, ECDC will be promoting reports and materials including:
•       a short video on the importance of clean hands (ttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sbx5ZZYNxzg)
•       infographics:
       – Antibiotic resistance – an increasing threat to human health (https://antibiotic.ecdc.europa.eu/en/publications-data/antibiotic-resistance-increasing-threat-human-health)
       – Healthcare-associated infections – a threat to patient safety in Europe (https://antibiotic.ecdc.europa.eu/en/publications-data/healthcare-associated-infections-threat-patient-safety-europe)
•       Highlights of the PPS published on Euro-surveillance:
       – Antimicrobial use in European acute care hospitals: results from the second point prevalence survey of healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial use, 2016-2017 (https://www.eurosurveillance.org/content/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.23.46.1800393).
       – Antimicrobial use in European long-term care facilities: results from the third point prevalence survey of healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial use, 2016-2017 (https://www.eurosurveillance.org/content/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2018.23.46.1800394).
       – Prevalence of healthcare-associated infections, estimated incidence, and composite antimicrobial resistance index in acute care hospitals and long-term care facilities: results from two European point prevalence surveys, 2016-2017 (https://www.eurosurveillance.org/content/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2018.23.46.1800516).

 

 

Resources:  World Health Organization

Updated 2019

 

The World Health Organization (WHO) Ranks Worlds Most Deadliest “Superbugs” In the World

 

the WHO has ranked world’s most deadly “Superbugs” in the world:

Three bacteria were listed as critical:

  • Acinetobacter baumannii bacteria that are resistant to important antibiotics called carbapenems. These are highly drug resistant bacteria that can cause a range of infections for hospitalized patients, including pneumonia, wound, or blood infections.
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which are resistant to carbapenems. These bacteria can cause skin rashes and ear infectious in healthy people but also severe blood infections and pneumonia when contracted by sick people in the hospital.
  • Enterobacteriaceae that are resistant to both carbepenems and another class of antibiotics, cephalosporins. This family of bacteria live in the human gut and includes bugs such as E. coli and Salmonella.

The list, which was released February 27th, 2017 and enumerates 12 bacterial threats, grouping them into three categories: critical, high, and medium.

“Antibiotic resistance is growing and we are running out of treatment options. If we leave it to market forces alone, the new antibiotics we most urgently need are not going to be developed in time,” said Dr. Marie-Paule Kieny, the WHO’s assistant director-general for health systems and innovation.

The international team of experts who drew up the new list urged researchers and pharmaceutical companies to focus their efforts on a type of bacteria known as Gram negatives.

(The terminology relates to how the bacteria respond to a stain — developed by Hans Christian Gram — used to make them easier to see under a microscope.)

Dr. Nicola Magrini, a scientist with the WHO’s department of innovation, access and use of essential medicines, said pharmaceutical companies have recently spent more efforts trying to find antibiotics for Gram positive bacteria, perhaps because they are easier and less costly to develop.

Gram negative bacteria typically live in the human gut, which means when they cause illness it can be serious bloodstream infections or urinary tract infections.

Gram positive bacteria are generally found outside the body, on the skin or in the nostrils.

Kieny said the 12 bacteria featured on the priority list were chosen based on the level of drug resistance that already exists for each, the numbers of deaths they cause, the frequency with which people become infected with them outside of hospitals, and the burden these infections place on health care systems.

Paradoxically, though, she and colleagues from the WHO could not provide an estimate of the annual number of deaths attributable to antibiotic-resistant infections. The international disease code system does not currently include a code for antibiotic-resistant infections; it is being amended to include one.

Six (6) others were listed as high priority for new antibiotics. That grouping represents bacteria that cause a large number of infections in otherwise healthy people. Included there is the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, for which there are almost no remaining effective treatments.

Three (3)  other bacteria were listed as being of medium priority, because they are becoming increasingly resistant to available drugs. This group includes Streptococcus pneumoniae that is not susceptible to penicillin. This bacterium causes pneumonia, ear and sinus infections, as well as meningitis and blood infections.

The creation of the list was applauded by others working to combat the rise of antibiotic resistance.

“This priority pathogens list, developed with input from across our community, is important to steer research in the race against drug resistant infection — one of the greatest threats to modern health,” said Tim Jinks, head of drug-resistant infections for the British medical charity Wellcome Trust.

“Within a generation, without new antibiotics, deaths from drug-resistant infection could reach 10 million a year. Without new medicines to treat deadly infection, lifesaving treatments like chemotherapy and organ transplant, and routine operations like caesareans and hip replacements, will be potentially fatal.”

FULL LIST:

Priority 1: Critical
1. Acinetobacter baumannii, carbapenem-resistant
2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, carbapenem-resistant
3. Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant, ESBL-producing

Priority 2: High
4. Enterococcus faecium, vancomycin-resistant
5. Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant, vancomycin-intermediate and resistant
6. Helicobacter pylori, clarithromycin-resistant
7. Campylobacter spp., fluoroquinolone-resistant
8. Salmonellae, fluoroquinolone-resistant
9. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, cephalosporin-resistant, fluoroquinolone-resistant

Priority 3: Medium
10. Streptococcus pneumoniae, penicillin-non-susceptible
11. Haemophilus influenzae, ampicillin-resistant
12. Shigella spp., fluoroquinolone-resistant

 

to read the article in its entirety click on the link below to be redirected:

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-who-has-ranked-the-deadliest-superbugs-in-the-world-2017-2

World Health Organization (WHO) World Antibiotic Awareness Week November 16-22

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The first World Antibiotic Awareness Week will be held from 16 to 22 November 2015. The campaign aims to increase awareness of global antibiotic resistance and to encourage best practices among the general public, health workers and policy makers to avoid the further emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance.