Tag Archives: C. diff. Diagnostic Stewardship

Changes In Electronic Health Records (EHR) To Guide Clinicians In C. diff. Diagnostic Stewardship – To Pause Testing When Not Clinically Indicated

An intervention that required administrative approval of all Clostridioides difficile testing after

hospital day 3 out-performed electronic health record-based support in reducing

C. difficile testing, according to a study.

“We made a series of changes in the electronic health records (EHRs) that we hoped would discourage clinicians from ordering C. difficile tests when testing was not clinically indicated, such as when patients with diarrhea had a more likely explanation such as recent laxative use, or when testing was ordered on patients who were not having diarrhea or other symptoms of C. difficile infection at all,” Lewis said. “In addition, one hospital in our system independently implemented a physician ‘gatekeeper’ to approve all C. difficile test orders for admitted patients.”

“We performed this work as part of a larger quality improvement initiative with the goal of improving the accuracy of diagnosis of C. difficile infection in order to improve quality of care for patients and decrease our health system’s publicly reported rates of C. difficile,” Sarah S. Lewis, MD, MPH, associate professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases at Duke University Medical Center, told Healio.

“We made a series of changes in the electronic health records (EHRs) that we hoped would discourage clinicians from ordering C. difficile tests when testing was not clinically indicated, such as when patients with diarrhea had a more likely explanation such as recent laxative use, or when testing was ordered on patients who were not having diarrhea or other symptoms of
C. difficile infection at all,” Lewis said. “In addition, one hospital in our system independently implemented a physician ‘gatekeeper’ to approve all C. difficile test orders for admitted patients.”

Lewis and colleagues tested the three EHR-based interventions at three hospitals. The first intervention, initiated in January 2018, alerted clinicians ordering a test if laxatives were administered within 24 hours. The second, initiated in October 2018, canceled test orders after 24 hours. Implemented in July 2019, he third intervention involved “contextual rule-driven order questions” that required justification when laxatives were administered or there was a lack of EHR documentation of diarrhea. In February 2019, one of the three hospitals then implemented the “gatekeeper intervention” requiring approval for all C. difficile tests after 3 days in the hospital.

Sarah S. Lewis

Lewis and colleagues estimated the impact of the interventions on C. difficile testing and hospital-onset C. difficile infection (HO-CDI) using an interrupted time-series analysis. They found that C. difficile testing was already declining in the preintervention period (annual change in incidence rate [IR] = 0.79; 95% CI, 0.72-0.87) and did not decrease further with the EHR interventions.

The study demonstrated, however, that the laxative alert was temporally associated with a trend reduction in HO-CDI (annual change in IR from baseline = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.75-0.96) at two hospitals. Meanwhile, the gatekeeper intervention at the third hospital was associated with level (incidence rate ratio [IRR[ = 0.5; 95% CI, 0.42-0.6) and trend reductions in C. difficile testing (annual change in IR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.85-0.98) and level (IRR = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.22-0.81) and trend reductions in HO-CDI (annual change in IR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.5–0.92) relative to the baseline period, the researchers reported.

“Diagnostic stewardship, or the appropriate utilization of diagnostic tests, is important for improving quality of care. Electronic decision support in the form of alerts or background logic to reinforce the desired provider behavior is attractive because it is relatively low resource, easy to implement, and can be programmed in a way that is relatively unobtrusive to the clinical workflow,” Lewis said. “However, as we and others have seen, decision support often needs to be coupled with both provider education and some form of administrative restriction to achieve desired goals.”

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https://www.healio.com/news/infectious-disease/20210624/test-restrictions-more-effective-than-ehrbased-support-at-reducing-c-difficile-testing?utm_source=selligent&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=topicalert&M_BT=7301325430025

Researchers Evaluate Healthcare-Onset and Healthcare-Facility-Associated C. difficile Infections

 

Authors:
Dipesh Solanky12Derek K Juang#12Scott T Johns#3Ian C Drobish12Sanjay R Mehta124Monika Kumaraswamy1245

Abstract

Objective: Lack of judicious testing can result in the incorrect diagnosis of Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI), unnecessary CDI treatment, increased costs, and falsely augmented hospital-acquired infection (HAI) rates. We evaluated facility-wide interventions used at the VA San Diego Healthcare System (VASDHS) to reduce healthcare-onset, healthcare-facility-associated CDI (HO-HCFA CDI), including the use of diagnostic stewardship with test ordering criteria.

Design: We conducted a retrospective study to assess the effectiveness of measures implemented to reduce the rate of HO-HCFA CDI at the VASDHS from fiscal year (FY)2015 to FY2018.

Interventions: Measures executed in a stepwise fashion included a hand hygiene initiative, prompt isolation of CDI patients, enhanced terminal room cleaning, reduction of fluoroquinolone and proton-pump inhibitor use, laboratory rejection of solid stool samples, and lastly diagnostic stewardship with C. difficile toxin B gene nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) criteria instituted in FY2018.

Results: From FY2015 to FY2018, 127 cases of HO-HCFA CDI were identified. All rate-reducing initiatives resulted in decreased HO-HCFA cases (from 44 to 13; P ≤ .05). However, the number of HO-HCFA cases (34 to 13; P ≤ .05), potential false-positive testing associated with colonization and laxative use (from 11 to 4), hospital days (from 596 to 332), CDI-related hospitalization costs (from $2,780,681 to $1,534,190) and treatment cost (from $7,158 vs $1,476) decreased substantially following the introduction of diagnostic stewardship with test criteria from FY2017 to FY2018.

Conclusions: Initiatives to decrease the risk for CDI and diagnostic stewardship of C. difficile stool NAAT significantly reduced HO-HCFA CDI rates, detection of potential false-positives associated with laxative use, and lowered healthcare costs. Diagnostic stewardship itself had the most dramatic impact on outcomes observed and served as an effective tool in reducing HO-HCFA CDI rates.

 

 

 

 

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https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32943129/