Category Archives: C. diff. prevention

The 4th Annual Global C. diff. Awareness 2K Walks Go Virtual on September 11 and 12

The 4th Annual Global C.diff. Awareness 2K Walks Will Now Be VIRTUAL!

                   Join Us On……………….

Friday, September 11th – UK

Dr. Clokie, UK Walk Event Coordinator, will be hosting the VIRTUAL Walk in Leicester on September 11th as the UK is also under strict guidelines to slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus. 

  • The Leicester VIRTUAL Walk Will Begin at 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. – UK

  • VIRTUAL Entertainment Will Begin at 10:00 a.m. UK For the Children!

Saturday, September 12th –  USA

  • The VIRTUAL Walks Will Begin at 9:00 a.m. through 12:00 p.m. EDT

  • VIRTUAL Entertainment Will Begin at 9:00 a.m. EDT For the Children!

All Registered Awareness Walkers Will Receive a T-Shirt, Giveaways, and More via: United States Postal Service To the Address Provided at the Time Of Registration.

To Learn More About the Global C. diff. Awareness Walk Event and How You Can Register, Please Click On the Green Button Below……………..

 

 

 

We are truly grateful for your efforts, support and participation
of the Annual Walk events and we look forward to virtually walking with you in September!

“None of us can do this alone ~ All of us can do this together!”
~ C Diff Foundation

Infectious Disease Research Finds the Laundering of Removable Bed Barriers More Effective at Reducing Hospital-Acquired Infections Keeping Patients Safe

Infectious disease research highlights that laundering removable bed barriers is more effective at reducing hospital-acquired infections and keeping patients safe

A new peer-reviewed study published today in Sage Journals’ Infectious Disease Research and Treatment publication, found that cleaning and disinfecting mattresses by using removable, launderable bed barriers is more effective at eliminating bacteria that cause C. diff, MRSA, and E.coli than manual processes using chemical disinfectants. These findings indicate a new, much-needed industry best practice that hospitals must adopt to keep patients safe – especially in today’s COVID-19 reality as more patients begin to re-enter hospitals and resume elective procedures.

Most hospitals currently conduct a manual one-step process of cleaning hospital beds and mattresses, despite being off-label use of the disinfectant and the manufacturer’s multi-step instructions for cleaning and disinfection. Studies have also shown that mattresses, which are difficult to disinfect, contribute to the high rates of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) in the United States. These concerns prompted ECRI to cite mattress contamination as one of its top health hazards in both 2018 and 2019.

“We evaluated the effectiveness of the commercial laundry process under extreme test conditions, using high concentrations of soilage, blood, and urine. Laundering the removable bed barriers eliminated every major organism that contributes to HAIs—when the fabric was tested both at the beginning and end of life of the barrier,” said Edmond Hooker, MD, DrPH, an epidemiologist and practicing physician who co-authored the study, “The findings are both significant and timely as hospitals grapple with growing concerns about patient safety and how to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and other diseases. The time is now to take action and protect patients with this evidenced-based approach to cleaning and disinfecting.”

The commercial laundry process detailed in the study provides detergent, bleach, agitation, and repeatability. These elements allow bacteria and spores to be physically separated from the barrier surface. The chlorine works to kill residual organisms. Multiple rinse cycles allow the microorganisms to be removed from the washing machine.

“The current state of cleaning and disinfecting beds and mattresses is dangerous because it can leave residual bacteria that can be transmitted from patient to patient. However, laundering removable bed barriers provides an alternative. It eliminates issues with insufficient removal of pathogens from the patient surface, ” said Ardis Hoven, MD, Professor of Medicine at the University of Kentucky and an Infectious Disease consultant to the Kentucky Department for Public Health. “Unlike the commonly used manual process, it exceeded FDA guidance on this type of device. Hospital administrators must translate this new knowledge into action to protect the patients and families they serve.”

Trinity Guardion, the maker of the Soteria Bed Barrier – a removable and launderable bed barrier – sponsored the study. Dr. Hooker is a professor at Xavier University’s Department of Healthcare Administration and associate professor at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. To view the full study results, please visit the publication website.

 

To read the publication in its entirety please visit

www.trinityguardion.com

 

Natural Ways to Keep Ticks Away From You and Your Pets

Tick Season has arrived and is in full-swing.

There are natural ways to keep the ticks away and decrease their existence.  This will help both you and your pets and decrease the risks in having a tick bite and acquiring Lyme Disease

It is recommended to keep the weeds down.  Ticks live in tall grass, weedy areas and in shrubs where they can easily hitch a ride on pets and people as they brush past. You can prevent ticks in your yard simply by keeping it well mowed. In your gardens, keep the weeds down as much as possible and maintain plenty of space between shrubs and perennials. This helps cut down on the number of places for ticks to hide, and it also makes it easier for your pets to walk through the gardens without brushing against the plants.

It’s a good time for the long-haired pets to try a shorter-summer haircut.  Ticks are a bigger problem for cats and dogs with long hair because all that fluff makes it easier for ticks to hitch a ride and hide. Consider giving your dog a short summer clip (but not too short because it protects them from sunburn). If you’d rather not trim a long-haired cat for the summer, your best bet may be to keep the kitty indoors or give them a confined outdoor area away from high grass and weedy spots. Be certain to do a thorough tick check before heading inside.

Try a Lint Roller.  After going for a walk in the woods, use a tape-style lint roller on your slacks, socks, sleeved shirts, jackets, and if there is a fellow-walker or group together — take turns rolling the lint roller across the clothing of each other to remove any hidden ticks and us the lint roller on your dog to pick up any ticks that have decided to hitch a ride

Add Food-Grade DE to the Gardens.   You can maintain plenty of space and weed regularly, and still there may be a few ticks hiding in your flowers and shrubs. You can protect your pets by using food-grade diatomaceous earth (DE) in the gardens. Because it dehydrates insects, this is an effective solution against ticks, fleas, and other pests.   Diatomaceous earth (sometimes to referred to simply as DE) is one of those handy substances that has all kinds of uses around the home and garden. It is mainly used for pest control, effective at killing everything from fleas and roaches indoors to aphids and slugs outdoors.  What is Diatomaceous Earth?   It’s useful, but what is it, exactly?   The short answer is fossils! Diatomaceous earth (pronounced “dia-toMAY-shus” earth) is ground fossilized remains of a type of phytoplankton called diatoms, which have existed on earth for millions of years. Of course, to look at diatomaceous earth, it doesn’t look like fossils and it is more of an off-white powder that looks similar to talc and has no odor.  Contact a local home-improvement garden center for more information.

Frequent Tick Checks.  Despite your best efforts, ticks will find their way onto you and your pets. To prevent tick bites, inspect yourself, your children, and family members along with your pets each day, and preferably each time you have all come in from the outside. With the pets: pay special attention to areas that your pet can’t easily reach such as around the head, behind the ears, and underneath their legs. Smaller deer ticks even hang out on eyelids. It’s a good habit to get into and try to be thorough.  If a tick is located contact a health care provider and for the pets contact their veterinarian to discuss tick removal and treatments.

Preventing Lyme Disease = Preventing Antibiotic Therapy = C.difficile Prevention and MORE.

Working together to prevent pain and suffering in both individuals and our pets. 

May Is National Walking Month and Time For the Annual Global C.diff. (CDI) Awareness 2K Walk

With its fresh Spring mornings and lovely long evenings – not to mention an extra long weekend – it’s no wonder that May is the official National Walking Month. Whether you prefer leisurely strolls or challenging hikes, our four park surroundings have a  walk for everyone to raise awareness of C.diff., walk for a cause in all locations.   Lace up your walking shoes and venture out to Milton A. Votee Park, Teaneck, N.J., Charlestown Township Park, Phoenixville, PA., Sims Park, New Port Richey, FL.,  on Saturday, May 18th to experience one of  these 3 C.diff. Awareness 2k walks.

 

Registration is open until May 8th.   3rd Annual Global C.diff. Awareness 2K Walks.

The USA events will take place on Saturday, May 18, 2019 from 8 a.m. – 12 p.m.

 

2019 CDIFF Global Awareness Walk

Dr. Martha Cloakie, PhD will be leading the walk in Leicester, U.K. on Friday, May 17, 2019.

All registered awareness walkers will receive t-shirts, giveaways, and educational material while introducing the communities to the resources available. C.diff. infections are one of the leading healthcare-associated infections facing local communities.

Registration is $20.00 per walker and children 10 years of age and under walk free. https://cdifffoundation.org/3rdannualwalk/

Proceeds from the events will benefit the C Diff Foundation’s mission educating and advocating for C.difficile infection prevention, treatments, clinical trials,  environmental safety, sepsis, and antibiotic awareness worldwide.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a Clostridioides difficile infection (C.difficile), (formally known as Clostridium difficile) “has become the most common microbial cause of healthcare-associated infections in U.S. hospitals and costs up to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs for acute care facilities alone.”

Statistics provided by the CDC suggest that C. difficile cause nearly 500,000 infections in patients in the U.S. annually. In one study noted by the CDC, among infected patients, nearly 29,000 died within 30 days of being diagnosed, and more than half of those deaths (15,000) were directly attributable to a C. difficile infection.

We sincerely thank Vedanta Biosciences, Inc. for being the Diamond Sponsor of the 3rd Annual Global C.diff. Awareness 2K Walks. Vedanta Biosciences, Inc. is dedicated to finding treatments for patients with serious infections and immune diseases. Vedanta develops medicines made of consortia of bacterial strains which are selected to effect robust and durable changes in a patient’s gut microbiota. In contrast to fecal transplants or administration of fecal fractions, Vedanta’s medicines are pure, uniform compositions of bacteria manufactured from clonal cell banks, bypassing the need to rely on direct sourcing of fecal donor material of inconsistent composition. Vedanta is currently enrolling patients with recurrent C. difficile infections (CDI) in its CONSORTIUM study to evaluate VE303, an investigational treatment for CDI.

Our gratitude to all of the sponsors for their support and partnering with the C Diff Foundation in raising C. diff. awareness worldwide:

Gold Sponsors:    Rebiotix, Pfizer, Ferring Pharmaceutical

Silver Sponsor:    CutisPharma

Bronze Sponsor: Finch Therapeutics

If you have any questions,  please contact one of our staff members at

(727) – 205 – 3922  or e-mail:  info@cdifffoundation.org

We look forward to walking with you on May 18th!

Follow Us On Twitter:   #CdiffWalks2019

Patient Safety Is Jeopardized by Unnecessary Antibiotics

Like any medication, antibiotics carry certain risks. While they are critical to treating a wide range of conditions, from strep throat and urinary tract infections to bacterial pneumonia and sepsis, these drugs also increase a patient’s chances of developing Clostridium difficile infections—which can result in life-threatening diarrhea—and can lead to adverse drug events, including allergic reactions.

Because of these dangers, it is important to use antibiotics only when needed. However, many antibiotics prescribed in the United States are unnecessary.

See what the research tells us and what leading antibiotic use experts say about inappropriate prescribing, the threat it poses to patient health, and how improved antibiotic stewardship can help to protect patient safety.

Improving Outpatient Antibiotic Use: The Role of Pediatricians

“For a long time, we believed that ‘erring on the safe side’ for our patients might be to prescribe an antibiotic just in case, even when we weren’t completely certain of the diagnosis. … Increasingly, we’re realizing that ‘being on the safe side’ often means not prescribing an antibiotic.”

Adam Hersh, M.D., University of Utah, Primary Children’s Hospital

 

Improving Outpatient Antibiotic Use: The Role of Emergency Room Doctors

“Acute bronchitis is one of the very common conditions we see in the emergency department and it’s also one … for which we have the best evidence that antibiotics should not be used, as these infections are typically caused by viruses and will resolve on their own. … I’ve seen … patients that received antibiotics for simple bronchitis or sinusitis that probably didn’t need the antibiotic, and then came in with life-threatening diarrheal illness, known as C. difficile infection.”

Larissa May, M.D., University of California, Davis

 

Improving Outpatient Antibiotic Use: The Role of Pharmacists

“I’ve had patients with antibiotic-associated adverse drug reactions … serious ones, such as Stevens-Johnson’s syndrome and [the] development of C. difficile.”

Katie Suda, Pharm.D., M.S., University of Illinois, Chicago

 

Improving Outpatient Antibiotic Use: The Role of Primary Care Physicians

“There’s a misperception on the part of doctors that patients want antibiotics. … [There] are millions of individual visits where we’re doing the wrong thing by our patients. We’re giving them medicines that they don’t need.”

Jeff Linder, M.D., M.P.H., Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School

 

One study estimated that a 30 percent reduction in broad-spectrum antibiotic use in hospitals could result in a 26 percent reduction in hospital-associated C. difficile infections.

Improving Outpatient Antibiotic Use: The Role of Nurse Practitioners

“What is concerning is a lot of people think every sore throat is strep throat, and they want antibiotics. The reality is that most sore throats are not strep throat. It is important that we make sure that we don’t give antibiotics just for a viral sore throat. … If we continue to prescribe antibiotics inappropriately … we will get to a point where children are not responding to antibiotics. And that’s very scary.”

Teri Woo, Ph.D., National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners

 

David Hyun, M.D., works on The Pew Charitable Trusts’ antibiotic resistance project.

 

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/articles/2017/03/16/unnecessary-antibiotic-use-jeopardizes-patient-safety