UV Room Disinfection: Scientific Evidence in Eliminating Healthcare-Associated Infections Worldwide

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Tuesday, April 21st: UV Room Disinfection: Scientific Evidence in Eliminating Healthcare Associated Infections Worldwide

Listen in at 11:00 a.m. Pacific , 2 pm Eastern time

http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/84813/uv-room-disinfection-scientific-evidence-in-eliminating-healthcare-associated-infections-worldwide

Guests:  Dr. Mark Stibich, PhD, is Chief Scientific Officer & Co-founder, Xenex. and
Ms. Sarah Simmons, MPH CIC, is Science Director, Xenex

Dr. Stibich and Ms. Simmons will discuss UV Room Disinfection, how pulsed UV disinfection works, the pulsed Xenon UV (PX-UV) difference, and the effectiveness against endospores like
C. diff.
and bacillus strains and the scientific evidence in eliminating
Healthcare-Associated Infections worldwide.

Dr. Mark Stibich, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer & Co-founder, Xenex
Dr. Stibich is a founder of Xenex and, as its Chief Scientific Officer, he oversees scientific research, product development, facility assessments, and protocol design. He leads new technology development and is an inventor on multiple patents. Dr. Stibich meets frequently with infection prevention representatives at healthcare facilities, helping them understand and solve their infection control challenges while analyzing hospital results. Dr. Stibich holds a doctoral degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, a Masters in Health Science, also from Johns Hopkins, and a bachelor’s degree from Yale University. He has conducted research in Russia, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, South Africa, Kenya, the United States and Brazil.

Ms. Sarah Simmons,  Science Director, Xenex
As an epidemiologist, Sarah Simmons works with customers to implement Xenex’s pulsed xenon UV light room disinfection technology in their facility, provide support for customers’ Infection Prevention departments, and evaluate their infection reduction results for publication in scientific journals. Sarah worked as an Infection Preventionist for five years in San Antonio, with a focus on infection prevention in critical care. She is a member of the San Antonio APIC chapter and has served on the board in numerous roles. Sarah is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Texas School of Public Health, has a Masters of Public Health in Epidemiology and Biostatistics from the Texas A&M School of Rural Public Health, and a Bachelors degree in Biology from Texas A&M University.