Tag Archives: Xenex

Xenex Disinfection Services’ LightStrike™ Robot With Pulsed Xenon Ultraviolet-C (UV-C) Light Technology Introduces Its LightStrike Disinfection Pod

The scientific evidence has clearly established that in the hospital environment, microorganisms such as Clostridium difficile (C.diff), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are responsible for the infections that kill nearly 300
people in the U.S. every day.

Xenex Disinfection Services’ LightStrike™ Robot with pulsed xenon ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light technology is a proven solution that quickly destroys deadly viruses, bacteria and spores before they pose a threat to patients and healthcare workers. LightStrike Robots help healthcare facilities reduce their HAI rates by destroying the microscopic germs that may be missed during the manual cleaning process. Xenex robots use pulsed xenon, a noble gas, to create Full Spectrum™, high intensity UV light that quickly destroys infectious germs in less than five minutes. Hospitals using Xenex devices have published clinical outcome studies in peer-reviewed journals showing 50-100 percent reductions in C.diff, MRSA and Surgical Site Infection rates when those hospitals used LightStrike Robots to disinfect rooms.

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Now, for the first time, hospitals can utilize the power of

LightStrike Germ-Zapping Robots™ to quickly disinfect mobile equipment just as effectively as they disinfect rooms within their facility. Pathogens like C.diff, Acinetobacter baumannii, MRSA and Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) can travel throughout a healthcare facility on mobile equipment.

To address this gap in the infection control process, Xenex recently partnered with an industry leader in containment units, Mintie Technologies, Inc., to create the LightStrike Disinfection Pod.

Designed to quickly disinfect reusable mobile equipment such as isolettes, ventilators, pressure monitors, wheelchairs and workstations, the

LightStrike Disinfection Pod enables the power of the LightStrike Robot’s intense, germicidal light to be used anywhere in a facility.
The Pod is collapsible, mobile and can be positioned in a hospital hallway or other areas without disrupting or impeding daily workflow. Its proprietary design integrates reflective interior fabric ensuring 360 degrees of UV light coverage over difficult-to-clean equipment including anesthesia carts, ventilators, and mobile imaging machines.

To access and read the article in its entirety please click on the link below:

https://www.dotmed.com/news/story/37771

Florida’s Tampa Bay Community; Raising C. diff. Awareness Event Planned For November 4, 2016

The Inaugural Tampa Bay Community Sunset Casual Dinner Dance

 “Raising  C. diff. Awareness”  Event

November 4, 2016   5:30pm – 9:30pm

2016CdiffNovFrontPC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Join us for the Inaugural 

Tampa Bay Community Sunset Casual Dinner Dance

“Raising C. diff. Awareness”  

on the evening of

November 4th  from 5:30 to 9:30 at the

Spartan Manor located in

New Port Richey, Florida

Community professionals, families, and friends will be gathered in a beautiful environment
while Raising C. diff. awareness.   There will be C. difficile Infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety information provided by clinicians and healthcare professionals and much more during this fun filled evening in New Port Richey, Florida.

Tickets are $25.00 each and are available through the C Diff Foundation

info@cdifffoundation.org   or Contact the main office toll-free:  1-844-367-2343

Enjoy a four course white glove plated dinner with entree choices of beef or chicken, with outstanding entertainment.

 Music and entertainment will be provided by ML Productions

SpartonManorBanquets-and-Special-Event-Venue

We look forward to sharing an enjoyable evening with  you on November 4th

 

(click on the above logo to be redirected to our sponsor’s website)

Highlights — 4th Annual International “Raising C. diff. Awareness” Conference — Boston

symposium

THE C DIFF FOUNDATION 

  4th ANNUAL

INTERNATIONAL RAISING C. diff. AWARENESS CONFERENCE

HIGHLIGHTS — PROMISE & CHALLENGES IN C. diff.  TREATMENT

Part 1: Novel Approaches and Therapies in Development

The Centers for Disease Control first recognized C. difficile infection (CDI) as an urgent threat to public health in September 2013. However, I first began to understand the impact on patients in 2008 when I was first diagnosed with Clostridium difficile (C. diff).  My journeys, including many months of illness (nine recurrent CDI) which  included a referral to hospice care before finally being correctly treated in 2009.  Henceforth; I was no stranger to this diagnosis with over two decades of  Nursing and witnessing the loss of my Father, whose life was claimed by C. difficile involvement in 2004.

C. diff.  has left me with serious health complications. Though I returned to my career as a Nurse for a brief time, I was diagnosed with an entirely new  C. diff infection in 2011– enduring  nine recurrences through the following year.  Another year  taken away from C. diff..

Like many other patients, the physical, financial and emotional toll has been great – not only on me, but also on my family.  Yet, through my  journeys and what I have learned in the process has inspired me to help others affected by C. diff.  and share with fellow healthcare professionals through educating and advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety worldwide.

I was proud to kick off the third annual International Raising C. diff Awareness Conference & Health EXPO in Cambridge, MA last fall.   The Annual Conference is one of many important initiatives the C Diff Foundation undertakes to build awareness, advance advocacy and support research to address the public health threat posed by this devastating, life-threatening  infection and common healthcare-associated infection.

Through the Conference–  the C Diff Foundation offers perspective from world renowned experts on C. difficile infection prevention, treatment and research, with discussions ranging from pharmaceutical options to environmental safety products.

♦ Here are the  highlights from our guest speakers ♦

Bezlotoxumab

Dr. Mary Beth Dorr, Director of Clinical Research, Infectious Diseases at Merck, presented the most recent data on the company’s C. diff antitoxin, bezlotoxumab. Nearest to potential FDA approval among new options for patients, bezlotoxumab would be used as an adjunct to standard antibiotic regimens for C. diff, with a goal of reducing recurrences—something for which no other drug has been approved.

Merck’s first trial, MODIFY 1 (Monoclonal Antibodies For C. DIFficile Therapy), included 1,412 patients globally. In addition to standard treatment of care, patients received a single intravenous infusion of either the antitoxin actoxumab (binds to the C. diff toxin A) or bezlotoxumab (binds to the C. diff toxin B) alone, or the two in combination, or a placebo.

This study called for a pre-specified interim analysis allowing for modifications in the trial after 40% of patients had completed a 12-week follow-up. As a result, actoxumab alone was dropped from further study as it did not provide added efficacy over bezlotoxumab alone or the combination of bezlotoxumab and actoxumab.

The MODIFY 2 trial evaluated an additional 1,163 patients who received standard antibiotic treatment for C. diff plus either bezlotoxumab alone, or the combination of bezlotoxumab and actoxumab, or placebo. The primary endpoint was prevention of a recurrence of C. diff infection at 12 weeks defined as a new episode of diarrhea and a positive stool test for toxigenic C. diff.

Many of the patients in the trial were quite ill: 17% had severe CDI, 18% had the more virulent PCR ribotype 027 strain, and about 20% were immunocompromised.

For the two studies overall, the rates of recurrent C. diff were significantly less in patients receiving bezlotoxumab alone than placebo (17% vs. 28%). Adverse events were no different in the treatment and placebo groups.

Because there was no benefit to the combination of the two antibodies, bezlotoxumab alone was selected for new drug applications submitted to the US FDA and European Medicines Agency seeking marketing approval.

Ecobiotics  — A Novel Approach To Recurrent CDI’s

Fecal microbial therapy, also referred to as FMT or stool transplants, generated much discussion. However; this therapeutic approach aiming to change the gut microbiome, the collection of bacteria and other microorganisms in and on our bodies, is being studied in clinical trials by two of the presenters.

Dr. David Cook, PhD, Executive Vice President of Research and Development and Chief Scientific Officer, Seres Therapeutics, spoke about “ecobiotic therapeutic restoration.” He noted that a dysbiotic, or imbalanced microbiome, is increasingly linked to multiple diseases including C. difficile infection, inflammatory bowel disease, and metabolic diseases like diabetes mellitus.   ECOSPOR ™ is their current Phase 2 clinical study focused on the safety and efficacy of SER-109, a drug for the potential prevention of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in adults who have had three or more episode of CDI within the previous nine months.

In its Phase 2 study, Seres used spores from the Clostridiales group of organisms, treated to decrease the risk of any pathogen transmission. A small group of patients with > 3 prior CDIs were given two doses of a mixture of strains of spores by mouth and followed up for 8 weeks. In this study, 13 of 15 (87%) patients met the primary endpoint of no recurrent diarrhea associated with a positive test for C. diff.

Another study, using a slightly smaller dose of spores, had the same findings. Overall, 29 of 30 (97%) patients had clinical resolution of their diarrhea; the improvement persisted at 24 weeks. A slightly larger Phase 2 study is underway now and Phase 3 studies are planned for 2016. The drug has received breakthrough and orphan drug designations from the FDA. Seres’ drug also reduced carriage of or colonization by multi-drug resistant organisms (MDRO), including Klebsiella, Providencia, and Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), all of which are recognized by the CDC as urgent or emerging health threats.

RBX2660  —  Therapeutic Microbiota Restoration

Dr. Lee Jones, Foundress and CEO of Rebiotix, presented ongoing studies with RBX2660. Their product, RBX2660, which also aims to restore a gut microbiome altered by CDI, has been designated a drug, rather than a tissue transplant, by the FDA and has received fast track, orphan drug, and breakthrough therapy designations. The liquid microbial suspension packaged for enema delivery is manufactured differently than fecal microbial transplants, and the end-product is standardized and ready for administration.

The initial Phase 2 study, PUNCH™, was open-label and included 30 patients with at least two recurrences of C. diff requiring hospitalization. With a 6-month follow-up period, this trial had an 87% efficacy rate and no recurrences. A second 120 patient randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial (PUNCH CD 2) is ongoing. Rebiotix is also developing an oral formulation and planning trials for other indications.

Vaccines

Approaches to vaccination were also discussed at the conference by the companies leading those research initiatives. Mucosal vaccination, to protect people from pathogens that enter or cause harm at the mucosal surface, or lining of our gastrointestinal or respiratory tracts, has been used in developing a variety of vaccines, including polio, typhoid, and experimental influenza vaccinations. Dr. Simon Cutting, PhD, Professor of Molecular Microbiology at
Royal Holloway, University of London
, explained the rationale behind this approach and reviewed supporting animal data. If approved, this vaccine would be administered orally.
These studies are still in early development.

Dr. Patricia Pietrobon, Associate Vice President, Research and Development, C. diff Program Leader at Sanofi Pasteur, presented an update on the company’s vaccine, H-030-012, which relies on injection of an inactivated whole toxin to both C. diff toxins A and B. Sanofi’s vaccine showed immunogenicity in patients in Phase 2 studies, and was the first vaccine to be awarded fast track approval by the FDA. Their vaccine showed an antibody response and immunologic boost after a dose at 6 months, suggesting vaccination might confer long-term protection from C. diff. A 15,000 participant, 5-year, global trial is underway, hoping to provide long-term immunity to C. diff.

Several other approaches for C. diff prevention and treatment were presented:
The first, described by Dr. Klaus Gottleib, MD, FACG, Vice President, Clinical Development and Regulatory Affairs, Synthetic Biologics, involves use of a beta-lactamase enzyme given orally in combination with a patient receiving a beta-lactam (penicillin or cephalosporin) antibiotic. The antibiotics would still have full efficacy in the blood or soft tissue, but the company’s hypothesis is that the enzyme will destroy unneeded antibiotic in the gut and will prevent
C. diff from developing by reducing alteration in the gut flora.
Their drug, SYN-004, is in Phase 2 trial development.

Dr. Martha Clokie, Ph.D.  Leicester UK, Professor in Microbiology.  Dr. Cloakie’s research focuses on phages that infect bacterial pathogens of medical relevance and  is focusing on  targeting  C. diff without altering the rest of the microbiome in preclinical studies. Hoping to destroy
C. diff with a biological warfare approach, she focuses on phages, tiny virus-like particles that infect bacteria.

Dr. Melanie Thompson, Ph.D.  is studying an older drug used for rheumatoid arthritis, auranofin, in Australia. Auranofin targets the selenium metabolism of C. diff, and is likely to be fairly specific treatment against that bacterium.

 

Part 2 – Challenges in Testing and Infection Management

 

Challenges

Testing

Among the key presentations, Dr. Mark Wilcox, MD, FRCPath, Head of Microbiology and Academic Lead of Pathology at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Leeds, lead on Clostridium difficile for Public Health England, and Chairman of the conference, addressed the challenges of diagnosing C. diff..  From knowing who to test, to which test to employ, the state of testing poses challenges in accurately determining the number of CDI cases and in comparing rates over time or between locations.

He raised important questions for the medical community to address:

  •  Who should be tested?
  • Which tests should be used?
  • How do we measure accuracy between tests in order to compare infection rates over time and by location?

Dr. Wilcox showed data from the Euclid Study in Europe looking at approximately 4,000 stool samples submitted to participating hospital labs on a given day, whether or not a test for           C. diff. was ordered.  The data shows that about 25% of cases were missed by the hospitals, but were picked up by a centralized reference lab.  On a single day, 246 patients (6.3%) received an incorrect result from their hospital.  The translates to about 40,000 cases of CDI missed in Europe alone per year and underscoring that CDI is far more common, and commonly missed than appreciated, making it hard to grasp both the magnitude of the problem and the treat individual patients.

Barley Chironda, RPN, CIC, Manager of Infection Prevention and Medical Device Reprocessing at St. Joseph’s Health Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada also addressed the topic of testing in acknowledging that some physicians may also be reluctant to order C. diff. tests both because the tests can be hard to interpret, and because there may be perceived disincentives for detecting and reporting the infection .  Hospitals can be penalized financially for infections acquired in the hospital as well as receive lower quality of care ratings.

Antibiotic Stewardship

While there is confusion over how to test for C. diff. there is a general understanding as to what we must do to contain the epidemic — use fewer antibiotics.  Currently, up to 85% of patients with C. difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) have received antibiotics in the 28 days before their CDI occurred.  More than 1/2 of all hospital patients receive an antibiotic, as do almost all surgical patients.  Estimates are that 30 – 50% of antibiotic use is unnecessary or inappropriate.

As Dr. Hudson Garrett, Jr., PhD, MSN, MPH, FNP, CSRN, VA-BC, Vice President, Clinical Affairs, PDI, Nice-Pak, and Sani Professional, explained, education of both healthcare workers and patients is needed.  Prescribers need to limit antibiotic use to the most specific or narrowest spectrum antibiotic they can, and patients need to learn that antibiotics are not helpful for colds or viral infections.

If use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in hospitals is reduced by 30%, the CDC has estimated there will be 26% fewer CDI’s.  Garrett stressed the importance of good leadership and multidisciplinary approach to the success of an antibiotic stewardship program, emphasizing the need for engagement, education and involvement from the top administrators, physicians, pharmacists, and patients,

Another concern is the overuse of the class of antibiotics called quinolones.  An especially toxic and severe strain of C. diff. NAP2/027/B1 has been emerging, seemingly driven by the use of fluoroquinolone antibiotics.  Quinolones are a widely prescribed class of antibiotics often used in treating pneumonia.

Limiting antibiotics and more appropriate use is not just for people — it is also important in agriculture.  There is a growing concern that contaminated products — both meat and                 produce — may transmit resistant organisms to people and spread C. diff. outside healthcare facilities.

Infection Control

Controlling the spread of  C. diff.  is a challenge.  While previously believed to be strictly a             healthcare-associated infection, recent findings show that many patients acquire C. diff. in the community.

As part of his presentation, “Behind the Scenes;  C. difficile Management in Health from the lens of an Infection Preventionist, ”  Barley Chronda, also reviewed infection control issues, focusing on the importance of cleaning.  He noted that 11% of occupants in a hospital room would acquire C. diff. if a prior patient had the infection.

The issues hospitals face include:

  •  A lack of dedicated equipment which may allow for the spread of C. diff. spores on items like stethoscopes and blood pressure cuffs;
  • Isolation for patients with diarrhea or incontinence with consideration for patient symptoms, hospital costs and appropriate patient care;
  • Lack of clarity re: responsibility for cleaning specific items, and what type of cleaning agent to use, as many products do not inactivate spores.  Clorox ® and UV-C Xenon, a high-energy, full spectrum ™ pulsed Xenon Ultraviolet Light by Xenex — both sponsors of the Conference, were addressed as options for CDI and a variety of multi-drug resistant organisms.
  • Hand-washing (Hand Hygiene) as many hospitals lack conveniently placed sinks and rely on alcohol hand sanitize gels and solutions,.  While alcohol is great for reducing most bacterial contamination, it is ineffective against C. diff. spores.

The Patient Journey Continues

Nancy Sheridan an Educator and  Volunteer Patient Advocate, represented the voice of the many patients who face the challenges of being diagnosed,  treated, and surviving a C. diff.  infection and shared her experience with the audience.  After developing diverticulitis complicated by a perforated colon following an overseas trip.  Nancy was treated with antibiotics and developed diarrhea.  Though doctors thought she might have a travel – related infection, she insisted on being tested for C. diff. and found C. diff. was causing her severe symptoms.  She suffered recurrent C. diff. infections, forcing her to take a leave of absence from her job.  In addition to the loss of income and mounting medical bills, she described feeling “defeated and broken.”

Desperate, housebound, in pain, and having a marked weight loss from her recurrent vomiting and bloody diarrhea, she asked for a fecal transplant.  Despite multiple refusals, she persisted.  Eight months after her ordeal began, Nancy received the stool transplant.  She describes her recovery as “miraculous” and within a few weeks, she was back to her teaching and active life.  Nancy concluded her story by reminding us that on any given day, 1 of 25 hospitalized patients becomes infected with C. diff. noting “the risk of contracting this deadly infection is too  great to remain uninformed.”

That message – from Nancy Sheridan, from the professionals who support us, and the patients who we hear from each day on our U.S. national Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) continue to drive us in educating, and advocating for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety, and providing support worldwide.

About The C Diff Foundation
The C Diff Foundation is a leading non-profit organization founded in 2012 by Nancy Caralla, a Nurse who was diagnosed and treated for recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infections. Through her own journey, and the loss of her father to C. difficile infection involvement, Nancy recognized the need for greater awareness through education about research being conducted by the government, industry and academia and better advocacy on behalf of patients, healthcare professionals and researchers worldwide working to address the public health threat posed by this devastating infection. Follow the C Diff Foundation on Twitter (@cdiffFoundation) or Facebook. For more information, visit: http://www.cdifffoundation.org/.

 

 

Xenex Germ Zapping Robot Cleans House To Protect A Pediatric Patient From Deadly Infections

Xenex_LogoLockups_PantoneC

 

 

To view video – click on the link below

http://wdtn.com/2015/11/23/robot-protects-8-year-old-with-brain-tumor-from-deadly-infection/

 

1.7-million Americans will pick up infections at the hospital this year, often antibiotic resistant superbugs hard to disinfect, that can potentially be fatal.

That has apparently happened to an eight-year-old Westlake boy. During the time he was receiving chemotherapy for his brain cancer, he got C. diff. , a superbug that kills one in ten people who get it, and lingers on surfaces for months. But Aydan Chapman is safely home now, his entire house disinfected by a superbug zapping robot.

The San Antonio based company Xenex recently sold its disinfecting robots to St. Davids in Austin. Within minutes, they can disinfect a hospital room for anything from Ebola, C. diff.  MRSA, norovirus, even Anthrax.

Also this fall, Aydan Chapman learned that he had acquired c-Diff, around the time of his chemo treatment at Dell Children’s Medical Center. Dell confirmed the infection. Aydan had already endured four brain tumors since 2009, now he is enduring chemo and strong antibiotics for the superbug.

Bryce Chapman, Aydan’s father, is hearing impaired but told KXAN through a Community Service for the Deaf sign reader, “It was extremely frustrating to see what was happening with him. It was actually two to three weeks before we learned he had the c-Diff, so he had gone through so much at this point. It felt like he was getting hit by more than one thing.”

UVC Emitting Robot
While effective against germs the UVC rays are also dangerous for humans; rooms must be emptied before the robot can begin cleaning.

Xenex learned of what happened. In four short years, they have sold the UVC emitting robots to 300 hospitals, including M.D. Anderson, the Dallas Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas where an Ebola patient died, to the UCLA Medical Center, and others. But occasionally they do pro bono work in homes and high schools. Friday they disinfected Aydan’s home, zapping it from top to bottom in one afternoon.

Xenex vice president Ryan N. Williams believes hospitals too often shortchange their cleaning efforts, “Hospitals are not doing the best they can to be able to eliminate these infections. The incidents of these superbugs and resistant bacteria in the environment has been on the rise. Traditional cleaning and the incidents of human error and oversight is just not good enough.”Aydan, a third grader, homeschools for now but he and his family rest easier knowing that while he continues his chemo, c-Diff may be the least of his worries. His dad says, Yes, it’s absolutely given us peace of mind. Definitely. Now we know our house is peaceful and clean for Aydan.” When asked how he is feeling these days, Aydan tells KXAN “I don’t know how to explain it.” He nodded when asked if he misses school, “I don’t get to see my friends and I don’t get to do the regular things I do at school.” His favorite part of school? “Recess, and math. Because I’m really good at it.” He smiles.

Taking a deeper look at the growing problem of hospital infections, c-Diff is the most common infection caught in American hospitals. It leads to 14,000 deaths a year. In a major study, the University of Texas College of Pharmacy found c-Diff infections doubled in the U.S. between 2001 and 2010, rising from 4.5 patients per thousand visits to 8.2 patients.
Just last year President Obama signed an executive order calling for a national strategy to combat antibiotic resistant bacteria, the so-called superbugs

 

To read article in its entirety click on the following link:

http://wdtn.com/2015/11/23/robot-protects-8-year-old-with-brain-tumor-from-deadly-infection/

 

 

#Cdiff2015 International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health Expo

2015 International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference & Health EXPO

Boston, MA, USA

November 9th

8:00 a.m – 5:00 p.m

symposium

Join us at our 3rd annual International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health EXPO on November 9th as world-renown Healthcare Professionals, Researchers, and Infection Preventionists come together to share the latest data pertaining to C. difficile  infection (CDI) prevention, treatments, clinical trials, environmental safety products, Microbiome research, Healthcare-Associated Infections and much, much  more…………

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Conference Venue:

Double Tree Suites Hotel – Boston – Cambridge
400 Soldiers Field Road, Boston, MA  02134  USA
1-617-783-0090 For Hotel Accommodations *   * There are rooms available for Sunday evening and being offered at a special event rate for guests of the C Diff Foundation.  Please inform the DoubleTree representative at the time of creating a reservation to receive the special event room rate.

Registration Fee:  $75.00

Student Fee:          $50.00

Registration includes the following:   Admission to all presentations, formal and informal Q&A sessions, introductions to fellow healthcare professionals, continental breakfast, a plated luncheon with a choice of main entree  (chicken or beef) and beverages.  access to the Health EXPO exhibits, a conference book containing sponsor information, educational DVD, and a  formal conference program.  

For Tickets and Registration CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINK TO ACCESS THE REGISTRATION PAGE:
 

http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=6iomnjnab&oeidk=a07ebaumwu164b799f9

 

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Guest Speakers

Key Speaker and Conference Chair:  Professor Mark Wilcox, Professor of Medical Microbiology, Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, UK. Professor Mark Wilcox is a Consultant Microbiologist, Head of Microbiology and Academic Lead of Pathology at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Leeds, and is the Lead on Clostridium difficile for the Public Health England. He has formerly been the Director of Infection Prevention, Infection Control Doctor and Clinical Director of Pathology at Leeds Teaching Hospitals.

Dr. John Bartlett, MD; Assistant Professor Medicine, UCLA/Sepulveda Veterans Admin Hospital 1972-5, Associate Professor and Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, 1975-80, Professor of Medicine and Chair Division of Infectious Diseases Division, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine 1980 – 2006; Professor of Medicine, 2006 – 13; Professor of Medicine emeritus, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2013.Dominant research interests: anaerobic infections and pulmonary infections 1968 – 74; community acquired pneumonia and diagnostic methods, 1974-1980; Bowel prep for elective colon surgery; Protected bronchoscopy brush catheter-1977; Clostridium difficile 1977 – 84, HIV 1983 – 2014; bioterrorism 1999 –2004; Clostridium difficile infection, HIV/AIDS and antibiotic resistance 2006-2013 with  Major current interests: Clostridium difficile infection, HIV infection, antibiotic resistance, careers in infectious diseases.

Professor Simon M. Cutting, is a bacterial geneticist with over 25 years of experience with Bacillus since graduating from Oxford University with a D. Phil in 1986. His work on Bacillus probiotics provides another area of research interests and he was the first to address the fundamental mechanisms that might enable these bacteria to promote potential health benefits.  Presentation Topic: CDVAX in the  prevention of C. difficile infection.”

Dr. Clifford McDonald, MD, Currently the Chief of the Prevention and Response Branch in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Center of Disease Control (CDC).  Dr. McDonald graduated from Northwestern University Medical School, completed his Internal Medicine Residency at Michigan State University, and an Infectious Disease Fellowship at the University of South Alabama, following which he completed a fellowship in Medical Microbiology at Duke University. He is the author or co-author of over 100 peer-reviewed publications with his main interests in the epidemiology and prevention of healthcare-associated infections, especially Clostridium difficile infections, and the prevention of antimicrobial resistance.  Dr. McDonald’s Presentation Topic: “Clostridium difficile disinfecting and spores.”

Barley Chironda, Manager of Infection Prevention and Control (IPAC) and Medical Device Reprocessing Device at St. Joseph Health Centre in Toronto, Canada. He is certified in Infection prevention and control (CIC TM) and has worked extensively as an Infection Preventionist. Barely has been an integral to the successful decline in Clostridium difficile infections through implementing innovative technology and quality improvement behavioral changes.   Barley’s presentation will show a behind the scenes account of the C. diff. management from the healthcare facilities perspective while providing a call to action.

Dr. Patricia Pietrobon, Ph.D. , Associate Vice President, Research & Development Sanofi Pasteur  has over 25 years of experience in the Vaccine & Diagnostic industries and more then 20 years in leadership roles focusing on research & development of new vaccines. Patricia began her career in diagnostic assay development with a focus on validation and quality alignment to regulatory requirements and GXPs. Patricia has been with Sanofi Pasteur for over 25 years and has contributed to the development and licensure of new bacterial & viral vaccines for pediatric & adult populations worldwide.
Sanofi Pasteur

Dr. Martha Clokie, PhD, Leicester UK, Professor in Microbiology.  Dr. Cloakie’s research focuses on phages that infect bacterial pathogens of medical relevance and  has published 41 papers in this area. Her major focus has been on Clostridium difficile where she has  isolated a large phage collection. In vitro and in vivo data has shown that the viruses have therapeutic potential. A patent has been filed  on these phages and  working with AmpliPhi to develop a product. Dr. Cloakie  has regular contact with the BBC and other media to talk about her work, and other phage projects, and has consulted with Science museum, London and Eden Project, UK to advise on bacteriophage displays.

Professor Nancy Sheridan,   a C. diff. Survivor and  Associate Professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology and a winner of the prestigious SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. Professor Sheridan will share her personal experience being treated for a painful and extended journey with a C. diff. infection (CDI).  Professor Sheridan has been teaching since fall 2000 in the Fashion Merchandising Management Department within the School of Business and Technology. For the past seven years, she has also taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Wharton Business School to undergraduate and MBA students.

Dr Mel Thomson, PhD,  completed her Honors degree in microbiology and immunology at the University of Melbourne . She then immigrated to the UK where she worked on various projects as diverse as allergy and cancer before undertaking further studies. She completed a Masters of Research in functional genomics before reading for a PhD in microbial genetic regulation in Neisseria species, both at University of York, UK. After the award of her PhD, Dr Thomson became interested the host-pathogen interactions at the Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, UK.  Dr Thomson returned to Australia in 2011 to start her own research group studying host-pathogen interactions in the GI tract, at Deakin Medical School. A passionate science communicator, she has recently become a national ‘torch bearer’ for the concept of crowd funding academic research, which a track record of three successful ‘Pozible’ crowd funding campaigns, ‘Mighty Maggots’, ‘Hips 4 Hipsters’ and ‘No more Poo Taboo’

+ many more……….

NOTE:  *Presentations are not to be recorded audio or video or published without the presenters written and signed permission to do so by each attendee seeking publication of said presentations.

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We look forward to meeting you in Boston, Massachusetts on November 9th

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 A suggested local travel coordinator, for your convenience

LibertyTraveldownloadMichael Beckman — Team Leader,  Liberty Travel, 467 Washington Street, Boston, MA  02111
617-936-2435
Michael.Beckman@flightcenter.com

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 We would like to sincerely thank the following Corporate Sponsors for their continued support for the “RAISING C. diff. AWARENESS” conference being hosted in Boston, MA

syntheticbiologics

CdifficileRandDLogo

 

AmericanGreenTechnologyhrms

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SporeGen Logo 2

UV Room Disinfection: Scientific Evidence in Eliminating Healthcare-Associated Infections Worldwide

CdiffRadioPostC. diff. Spores and More  #CdiffRadio

Tuesday, April 21st: UV Room Disinfection: Scientific Evidence in Eliminating Healthcare Associated Infections Worldwide

Listen in at 11:00 a.m. Pacific , 2 pm Eastern time

http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/84813/uv-room-disinfection-scientific-evidence-in-eliminating-healthcare-associated-infections-worldwide

Guests:  Dr. Mark Stibich, PhD, is Chief Scientific Officer & Co-founder, Xenex. and
Ms. Sarah Simmons, MPH CIC, is Science Director, Xenex

Dr. Stibich and Ms. Simmons will discuss UV Room Disinfection, how pulsed UV disinfection works, the pulsed Xenon UV (PX-UV) difference, and the effectiveness against endospores like
C. diff.
and bacillus strains and the scientific evidence in eliminating
Healthcare-Associated Infections worldwide.

Dr. Mark Stibich, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer & Co-founder, Xenex
Dr. Stibich is a founder of Xenex and, as its Chief Scientific Officer, he oversees scientific research, product development, facility assessments, and protocol design. He leads new technology development and is an inventor on multiple patents. Dr. Stibich meets frequently with infection prevention representatives at healthcare facilities, helping them understand and solve their infection control challenges while analyzing hospital results. Dr. Stibich holds a doctoral degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, a Masters in Health Science, also from Johns Hopkins, and a bachelor’s degree from Yale University. He has conducted research in Russia, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, South Africa, Kenya, the United States and Brazil.

Ms. Sarah Simmons,  Science Director, Xenex
As an epidemiologist, Sarah Simmons works with customers to implement Xenex’s pulsed xenon UV light room disinfection technology in their facility, provide support for customers’ Infection Prevention departments, and evaluate their infection reduction results for publication in scientific journals. Sarah worked as an Infection Preventionist for five years in San Antonio, with a focus on infection prevention in critical care. She is a member of the San Antonio APIC chapter and has served on the board in numerous roles. Sarah is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Texas School of Public Health, has a Masters of Public Health in Epidemiology and Biostatistics from the Texas A&M School of Rural Public Health, and a Bachelors degree in Biology from Texas A&M University.

 

Xenex Improving Patient Safety In The Operating Room

Xenexrobot2015

Interest in understanding the role of the operating room (OR) environment in transmission of surgical site infections (SSIs) has increased greatly in recent years. Numerous studies have shown that standard cleaning practices leave significant levels of contamination on OR surfaces and can contribute to SSIs, the most expensive hospital acquired infection (HAI) to treat. Xenex Disinfection Services’ patented pulsed xenon Full Spectrum™ ultraviolet (UV) disinfection technology has been proven to quickly destroy the viruses, bacteria, mold, fungus and bacterial spores in ORs that cause SSIs.

Traditional cleaning practices leave behind dangerous pathogens such as Clostridium difficile (C.diff), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). A study conducted at Cambridge Health Alliance, a Harvard Medical School Teaching Affiliate, demonstrated that pulsed xenon UV light disinfection can significantly decrease OR contamination. The study showed that Xenex’s germ-zapping robot reduced surface contamination in the OR by 81 percent, and that while between-case contamination in the OR continued to rise from case to case with standard cleaning, it was reduced to almost zero when the Xenex robot was used between cases.

Xenex will demonstrate its germ-zapping robot at the Association of Perioperative Registered Nurses (AORN) Surgical Conference & Expo in Denver, CO, March 7-10, 2015. Hospitals using Xenex for OR disinfection will discuss how they are eliminating the microorganisms that cause infections and make patients and healthcare workers sick.

Xenex has teamed up with AORN to host an educational session as part of the AORN Leadership Development series. On Tuesday, March 10, Julie Tonsager, OR Team Lead at St. Cloud Surgical Center, will share the facility’s two-year journey in evaluating UV technology. She will discuss the steps they took to ensure a successful implementation in their ORs.

“The risk of post-op infection poses a great risk to patients and healthcare facilities alike. We have proven repeatedly that hospitals using our room disinfection technology are reducing patient risk because they are destroying the microorganisms that cause infections. Most importantly, hospitals using our robots are reporting infection rate reductions of more than 50 percent as outcome studies in peer reviewed medical journals,” said Dr. Mark Stibich, Chief Scientific Officer of Xenex. “Unlike other UV disinfection systems, the Xenex robot utilizes pulsed xenon and kills C.diff spores in less than five minutes. The robot’s five-minute disinfection cycle enables it to disinfect areas and rooms quickly so it can be used throughout the entire facility, including multi-bed wards, to enhance patient and healthcare worker safety.”

Uniquely designed for ease of use and portability, a hospital’s environmental services staff can operate the Xenex robot without disrupting hospital operations and without using expensive chemicals. With a five-minute disinfection cycle, the robot has helped disinfect 30-62 hospital rooms per day (according to Xenex customer reports), including patient rooms, operating rooms, equipment rooms, emergency rooms, intensive care units and public areas. More than 250 hospitals, Veterans Affairs and DoD facilities in the U.S. are using Xenex robots, which are also in use in skilled nursing facilities, ambulatory surgery centers and long term acute care facilities.

There are now ten peer reviewed studies confirming the efficacy of the Xenex Germ-Zapping Robot™ in the healthcare environment, including three studies showing a decrease in C.diff, MRSA and MDRO infections when the hospital used the Xenex robot for room disinfection.

About Xenex Disinfection Services

Xenex’s patented pulsed xenon Full Spectrum UV room disinfection system is a pesticidal device used for the advanced cleaning of healthcare facilities. Due to its speed and ease of use, the Xenex system has proven to integrate smoothly into hospital cleaning operations. The Xenex mission is to eliminate harmful bacteria, viruses and spores that can cause hospital acquired infections in the patient environment, and to become the new standard method for disinfection in healthcare facilities worldwide. For more information, visit www.xenex.com.

 

To review in its entirety click on the link below

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/improving-patient-safety-operating-room-203000073.html