Tag Archives: C. difficile environmental safety

Perspective and Key Issues Regarding Healthcare Textiles and Infection Prevention Q&A With Infection Control Today + Healthcare Laundry Accreditation Council

SAFETY

Infection Control Today (ICT) asked board members of the Healthcare Laundry Accreditation Council (HLAC) for their perspectives on key issues relating to infection prevention and healthcare textiles management.

 

 

Q: What are the gaps in research that are needed to advance healthcare textile science?
A: We view gaps as opportunities for advancements in healthcare textile science, and these opportunities are in large part being driven by infection prevention’s changing landscape. Growing drug resistance, the threat of pandemics and the cost of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) require that we gain a much better understanding of the morphology of organisms as it relates to their resistance and the chain of transmission. The list of infectious agents continues to grow and include prions, Clostridium difficile (C. diff.), Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Ebola, etc. Each is unique and presents its own challenges for healthcare textiles, including the need to protect patient and staff from exposure situations (e.g., via personal protective equipment), assisting in patient-care activities (from exam gowns to incontinence products), and ultimately the need for them to be effectively cleaned/sanitized for reuse. The emergency guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for Ebola highlight the point: all items including textiles exposed to an Ebola patient must be incinerated. Though it is a very pragmatic and understandable decision, it is not an effective or sustainable one.
A better understanding of these infectious agents will allow for:
– The development of barrier fabrics that include chemical finishes that offer better and more specialized protection for the wearer
– Optimized cleaning and sanitizing conditions in the reprocessing of reusable products
– The use of scientifically based guidelines (not emotional ones) that effectively mitigate (not displace) infection risk in the handling contaminated textiles – (i.e., exposure of waste handlers vs. handling by trained reprocessing professionals).
— Bradley J. Bushman, vice president of technical affairs, Standard Textile Co. Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio

Q: What are the imperatives about proper healthcare laundry processes that infection preventionists (IPs) must know?
A: IPs must be well-versed in the end-to-end healthcare laundry process, especially in the context of potential infection risks from contaminated healthcare textiles (HCTs). Contamination risks extend well beyond the actual wash process. While it is imperative to have a validated wash process that consistently produces hygienically safe and clean textiles, close attention must be paid to the many contamination risks after the wash process. HCT contamination after the wash process is just as dangerous as contamination from improperly washed HCTs.
Key areas to look for potential HCT contamination include:
– Dirty finish surfaces that may touch clean HCTs
– Carts, after being loaded, that are improperly stored outside on a loading dock
– HCT transfer carts that are not protected from the environment via fluid-proof covers or doors
– Dirty hands of laundry workers handling clean HCTs
– Dirty/linty equipment used to process HCTs
– The presence of dirty/soiled HCTs in an area with clean HCT
– Contaminated air flowing into a clean HCT area.
Also, it’s imperative to ensure that laundry workers are well-trained in hygiene concepts such as proper hand hygiene; proper environmental cleaning; the importance of functional separation of soiled and clean; and proper HCT sorting, washing, drying, and finishing.
— Gregory Gicewicz, HLAC immediate past president; president, Sterile Surgical Systems, Tumwater, Wash.

Q: How important is it for healthcare laundry personnel to work with IPs and other stakeholders to achieve good outcomes?
A: It is very important. It’s essential to have open communication and collaboration between the healthcare IP and the laundry profession. There must be a sharing of knowledge and operational details, both the laundry operations and the healthcare facility operation, for each professional to be able to positively interact with each other.
The IP is involved in and responsible for observation, or surveillance, of aspects relating to both patient safety and infection prevention. This includes the collection and analysis of infection prevention and control data; review of products and procedures; follow-up on infection risk; prevention and control approaches; educational interventions to avoid or mitigate infection; and the application of changes mandated by regulatory and licensing agencies such as the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA). The more knowledge the IP has concerning the operations of a laundry, the more epidemiological principles can be applied to improve patient care outcomes.
In welcoming the IP, a bond can be established that allows both entities to address ongoing issues with desired outcomes. Utilizing observation to follow the laundry progression of textiles in a step-by-step process will enable the IP to determine if there are perceived breaches in the process and can share these concerns with the laundry operator and personnel. In turn, the healthcare laundry operator may notify the healthcare facility administration and IP of concerns they may encounter in the healthcare laundry.
— Joan Blanchard, RN, MSS, CNOR, CIC, infection prevention assistant, Littleton Adventist Hospital, Littleton, Colo.

Q: What are some ways that IPs can help facilitate dialogue and collaboration with healthcare laundry professionals?
A: We encourage IPs to have a strong, trusted partnership with their healthcare laundry vendor. A good practice is for the hospital IP team members to treat their healthcare laundry professionals as part of their extended team, where there’s an ongoing sharing of updates in infection control and prevention efforts and in the regulatory and licensing arenas. By establishing a working relationship with healthcare laundry personnel, problems that arise with the laundry process or the healthcare facility process can be more readily corrected and unresolved issues can be more directly addressed.
Important to this team-style relationship is for the IP to visit the healthcare laundry to become acquainted with the personnel responsible for administering the laundry. In fact, the laundry should be open to at least yearly visits from their IPs. These visits are more productive when they’re treated collaboratively. The purpose of visits is to ensure that the processes used by the healthcare laundry is safe and supported by research*. Utilizing HLAC’s Standards Checklist (available at www.hlacnet.org) as a guideline during these visits ensures that a thorough over-view of the laundry process is accomplished.
— Gregory Gicewicz, HLAC immediate past president; president, Sterile Surgical Systems, Tumwater, Wash.; and Joan Blanchard, RN, MSS, CNOR, CIC, infection prevention assistant, Littleton Adventist Hospital, Littleton, Colo.

Q: What are the unresolved key issues related to infection prevention and healthcare textiles that remain for the future?
A: Without education and awareness, the same myths about healthcare laundry that have persisted for a long time will continue. For example:
– Myth: The laundry industry is regulated – by someone.
– Myth: The laundry industry is regulated by the government.
– Myth: If the hospital is accredited then so is the laundry.
– Myth: All textiles are washed the same.
– Myth: When it comes to knowing all about laundry matters, the hospital IP is on top of it.
– Myth: Every healthcare laundry is accredited.
Only the education of healthcare professionals, including IPs, can overcome these myths.
Furthermore, in the expanding world of pathogens, we will continue to see more bacteria and viruses developing more lethal strains and antibiotics becoming less and less effective. HLAC believes that going forward we should be striving for a more robust, collaborative effort among healthcare laundries, IPs, environmental services, laundry departments, quality management, and healthcare resource and materials management professionals.
Another point: It’s not unrealistic for hospitals to begin to look at healthcare textiles as an investment in quality patient outcomes and not just an expense. Bear in mind that the processing of healthcare textiles is a reimbursable expense by CMS because healthcare textiles have a direct impact on patient outcomes.
Because of these issues, we believe that every laundry that is providing healthcare textile processing services should be HLAC-accredited. Doing so would ensure that all patients receive textiles that are processed to the highest level, thus safeguarding that three of the four major principles of medical ethics are afforded of all patients: Justice, beneficence, and non-maleficence. We believe that there is a moral and ethical obligation to do the right thing for patients and processing healthcare textiles to the highest level possible helps to fulfill those obligations. We believe that working collaboratively, IPs and laundry operators will be key players in this process.
— Joan Blanchard, RN, MSS, CNOR, CIC, infection prevention assistant, Littleton Adventist Hospital, Littleton, Colo.; and John Scherberger, HLAC board president; president, Healthcare Risk Mitigation, Spartanburg, S.C.

References:
1. Centers for Medicare/Medicaid Services. CMS Hospital Infection Control Worksheet. https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Provider-Enrollment-and-Certification/GenInfo/Downloads/Survey-and-Cert-Letter-15-12-Attachment-1.pdf Accessed July 14, 2016.
2. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Toxic and Hazardous Substances: Bloodborne Pathogens, 29 CFR § 1030 (2012). Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
3. Siegel JD, Rhinehart E, Jackson M, Chierello L. the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Committee. 2007 Guideline for Isolation Precautions: Preventing Transmission of Infectious Agents in Healthcare Settings. 2007.
4. Accreditation Standards for Processing Reusable Textiles for use in Healthcare Facilities. 2016 ed Frankfort, IL. Health care Laundry Accreditation Council. 2016.
5. Protecting Workers Families—DHHS(NIOSH) Pub No. 1002-113. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.
6. AINSI/AAMI ST65 2008/R 2013 Processing of Reusable Surgical Textiles for Use in Healthcare Facilities. 2013. Arlington, VA.: Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation: 2013.
7. Guideline for Surgical Attire. In: Guidelines for Perioperative. Denver, CO: AORN, Inc.: 2016.

RESOURCE:

http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/articles/2016/09/hlac-board-members-address-imperatives-related-to-healthcare-textiles.aspx

C. difficile Infection (CDI) Prevention, Treatment, Environmental Safety, Research, Clinical Trials Being Discussed with World Topic Experts On September 20th In Atlanta, Georgia USA

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September 20th

It is with great pride and certainty in the power of the healthcare community to present the 4th Annual International Raising. C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health Expo

being hosted at the

DoubleTree by Hilton — Atlanta Airport 
3400 Norman Berry Drive
Atlanta,Georgia 30344 USA  (Hotel Phone: 1-404-763-1600)

Doors open at 7:15 a.m — Sign In and Continental Breakfast

Conference begins at: 7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

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Raising C. difficile awareness is essential to build upon and advance existing knowledge and necessary for overcoming the challenges our healthcare communities are faced with today.

“None of us can do this alone — All of us can do this together”

Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released February 25, 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   C. diff. is a leading cause of infectious disease death worldwide; 29,000 died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis in the USA.   Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of healthcare-associated infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone.

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Cdiff2015-1Clinical professionals gather for one day to present up-to-date data to expand on the existing knowledge and raise awareness of the urgency focused on a Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) —

    • Prevention
    • Treatments
    • Research
    • Environmental Safety
    • Clinical trials and studies

WITH

  • Microbiome research, studies
  • Infection Prevention
  • Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants for Adults & Pediatrics
  • A Panel Of C. diff. Infection Survivors
  • Antibiotic Stewardship
  • Healthcare EXPO
    ……………………and much more.

You won’t want to miss out on this opportunity to learn from
International topic experts delivering data directed at evidence-based
prevention, treatments, and environmental safety in the C. diff.
and healthcare community.

Gain insights on September 20th that will not be available anywhere else with an opportunity to receive up-to-date data on major topics in this program being presented in one day.

5 Leading reasons to attend this dynamic conference:

  • Learn from leading healthcare professionals, clinicians, researchers, and industry.
  • Networking opportunities with new and reconnect with those in the healthcare community with similar interests.
  • Gain breakthrough results through research in progress and gaining positive results. Programs focused on Antibiotic-resistance such as the  Antibiotic Stewardship making a difference. Front line developments in progress focused on C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety.
  • Implement and share the knowledge well after the conference ends.  Every attendee receives a booklet with guest speakers information, media to review audio programs, and Health Expo Sponsor information focused on the important agenda topics.
  • Embrace the opportunity, with all of the topic experts presenting, and hold the conference in the highest priority from the participation in this conference to an audience of medical students, and fellow healthcare professionals, who will benefit the most from the data and gain tools to overcome the barriers facing healthcare each day.

“The information and up-to-date studies shared at the 2015 conference added to an existing knowledge base that helps us to continue delivering quality care in the medical community.”   Linda Davis, RN,BSN

 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

REGISTRATION FEES:

$75.00  —  Conference Registration

$30.00  —  Student Conference Registration (Student ID To Be Presented At the Door)

TO REGISTER Click on the “Raising C. diff. Awareness” Ribbon below

CDiffAwarenessRibbon2015

Room accommodations are available —  Complete and Confirm 

by August 19th to reserve your hotel reservations.   

To create a reservation please click on the DoubleTree By Hilton Logo below – – – – – –

DoubleTreeLogo

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

 A suggested travel coordinator, for your convenience

LibertyTraveldownloadMichael Beckman — Team Leader,  Liberty Travel, 467 Washington Street, Boston, MA  02111
617-936-2435
Michael.Beckman@flightcenter.com

 For Additional Information visit the C Diff Foundation Website:

https://cdifffoundation.org/

https://cdifffoundation.org/

And Click on the 2016 September Conference Tab

 

Follow us on Twitter
@cdiffFoundation
#Cdiff2016

Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) Infection (CDI) Rates In the United States and Across the Globe Have Increased In the Last Decade, Along With Associated Morbidity and Mortality

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Early Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment of Clostridium difficile: Update

Prepared for:
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD 20857
March 2016

 

Clostridium difficile is a gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium generally associated through ingestion. Various strains of the bacteria may produce disease generating toxins
and TedA and TedB, as well as the lesser understood binary toxin.

Our use of the term indicates this review’s focus is the presence of clinical disease rather than asymptomatic carriage of C. difficile CDI symptoms can range from mild diarrhea to severe cases including pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon and death.

Estimated U.S. health care associated CDI incidence in 2011 was 95.3 per 100,000, or about
293,000 cases nationally. Incidence is higher among females, whites, and persons 65 years of
age or older. (1)

About one third to one half of health-care onset CDI cases begin in long term care,thus residents in these facilities are at high risk.  Incidence rates may increase by four or five-fold during outbreaks.

Community associated CDI, where CDI occurs outside the institutional setting,
is also on the rise, though still generally lower than institution associated rates and may be in part due to increased surveillance. Estimated community associated CDI was 51.9 per 100,000, or   159,700 cases in 2011.  (1)

Community-associated CDI complicates measuring the effectiveness of  prevention within an institutional setting. 3  Additionally, the pathogenesis of CDI is complex and not
completely understood, and onset may occur as late as several months after hospitalization or antibiotic use

The estimated mortality rate for health -care associated CDI ranged from 2.4 to 8.9 deaths per

100,000 population in 2011.(1) For individuals ≥65 years of age, the mortality rate
was 55.1 deaths per 100,000; (1)

CDI was the 17th leading cause of death in this age group (4)
Hypervirulent C. difficile  strains have emerged since 2000 . These affect a wider population

that includes children, pregnant women, and other healthy
adults, many of whom lack standard risk profiles such as previous hospitalization or antibiotic use.(5)

The hypervirulent strains  account for 51 percent of CDI, compared to only 17 percent
of historical isolates. (6)

Time from symptom development to septic shock may be reduced in the hypervirulent strains, making quick diagnosis and proactive treatment regimens critical for positive outcomes.

To read more on  TREATMENT, PREVENTION, KEY QUESTIONS ——

https://www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/ehc/products/604/2208/c-difficile-update-report-160329.pdf

Early Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment of Clostridium difficile: Update

Prepared for:
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD 20857
March 2016

 

Sources:

1Appendix J. References for Appendixes
1.Alcala L, Reigadas E, Marin M, et al.
Comparison of GenomEra C. difficile and Xpert
C. difficile as confirmatory tests in a multistep
algorithm for diagnosis of Clostridium difficile
infection.
J Clin Microbiol 2015 Jan;53(1):332
5. PMID: 25392360.
2.Barkin JA, Nandi N, Miller N, et al.
Super iority
of the DNA amplification assay for the
diagnosis of C. difficile infection: a clinical
comparison of fecal tests.
Dig Dis Sci 2012Oct;57(10):2592-
9. PMID: 22576711.
3.Bruins MJ, Verbeek E, Wallinga JA, et al.
Evaluation of three enzyme immunoassay
s and a loo mediated isothermal amplification test
for the laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium
difficile infection. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect
Dis 2012 Nov;31(11):3035 9. PMID:
22706512.
4.Buchan BW, Mackey TL, Daly JA, et al.
Multicenter clinical evalu
ation of the portrait
toxigenic C. difficile assay for detection of
toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains in clinical
stool specimens. J Clin Microbiol 2012
Dec;50(12):3932-
6. PMID: 23015667.
5.Calderaro A, Buttrini M, Martinelli M, et al.
Comparative analysis of different methods to
detect Clostridium difficile infection. New
Microbiol 2013 Jan;36(1):57-
63. PMID:
23435816.
6.Carroll KC, Buchan BW, Tan S, et al.
Multicenter evaluation of the Verigene
Clostridium difficile nucleic acid assay.
J ClinMicrobiol 2013 Dec;51(12):4120-
5. PMID:24088862

UV Room Disinfection: Scientific Evidence in Eliminating Healthcare-Associated Infections Worldwide

CdiffRadioPostC. diff. Spores and More  #CdiffRadio

Tuesday, April 21st: UV Room Disinfection: Scientific Evidence in Eliminating Healthcare Associated Infections Worldwide

Listen in at 11:00 a.m. Pacific , 2 pm Eastern time

http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/84813/uv-room-disinfection-scientific-evidence-in-eliminating-healthcare-associated-infections-worldwide

Guests:  Dr. Mark Stibich, PhD, is Chief Scientific Officer & Co-founder, Xenex. and
Ms. Sarah Simmons, MPH CIC, is Science Director, Xenex

Dr. Stibich and Ms. Simmons will discuss UV Room Disinfection, how pulsed UV disinfection works, the pulsed Xenon UV (PX-UV) difference, and the effectiveness against endospores like
C. diff.
and bacillus strains and the scientific evidence in eliminating
Healthcare-Associated Infections worldwide.

Dr. Mark Stibich, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer & Co-founder, Xenex
Dr. Stibich is a founder of Xenex and, as its Chief Scientific Officer, he oversees scientific research, product development, facility assessments, and protocol design. He leads new technology development and is an inventor on multiple patents. Dr. Stibich meets frequently with infection prevention representatives at healthcare facilities, helping them understand and solve their infection control challenges while analyzing hospital results. Dr. Stibich holds a doctoral degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, a Masters in Health Science, also from Johns Hopkins, and a bachelor’s degree from Yale University. He has conducted research in Russia, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, South Africa, Kenya, the United States and Brazil.

Ms. Sarah Simmons,  Science Director, Xenex
As an epidemiologist, Sarah Simmons works with customers to implement Xenex’s pulsed xenon UV light room disinfection technology in their facility, provide support for customers’ Infection Prevention departments, and evaluate their infection reduction results for publication in scientific journals. Sarah worked as an Infection Preventionist for five years in San Antonio, with a focus on infection prevention in critical care. She is a member of the San Antonio APIC chapter and has served on the board in numerous roles. Sarah is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Texas School of Public Health, has a Masters of Public Health in Epidemiology and Biostatistics from the Texas A&M School of Rural Public Health, and a Bachelors degree in Biology from Texas A&M University.

 

Evaluation of a Pulsed Xenon Ultraviolet (PX-UV) Disinfection System for Reduction of Healthcare-Associated Pathogens in Hospital Rooms

“Evaluation of a Pulsed Xenon Ultraviolet (PX-UV) Disinfection System for Reduction of Healthcare-Associated Pathogens in Hospital Rooms”

A study conducted by Dr. Curtis Donskey, and a team of researchers with the objective to determine the effectiveness of pulsed xenon ultraviolet (PX-UV) disinfection device for reduction in recovery of healthcare-associated pathogens was recently published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology (ICHE).

Michelle M. Nerandzica1 c1, Priyaleela Thotaa2, Thriveen Sankar C.a2, Annette Jencsona1, Jennifer L. Cadnuma2, Amy J. Raya2a3, Robert A. Salataa2a3, Richard R. Watkinsa4 and Curtis J. Donskeya2a3a5

a1 Research Service, Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio

a2 Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio

a3 Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio

a4 Akron General Medical Center, Akron, Ohio

a5 Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness of a pulsed xenon ultraviolet (PX-UV) disinfection device for reduction in recovery of healthcare-associated pathogens.

SETTING Two acute-care hospitals.

METHODS We examined the effectiveness of PX-UV for killing of Clostridium difficile spores, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) on glass carriers and evaluated the impact of pathogen concentration, distance from the device, organic load, and shading from the direct field of radiation on killing efficacy. We compared the effectiveness of PX-UV and ultraviolet-C (UV-C) irradiation, each delivered for 10 minutes at 4 feet. In hospital rooms, the frequency of native pathogen contamination on high-touch surfaces was assessed before and after 10 minutes of PX-UV irradiation.

RESULTS On carriers, irradiation delivered for 10 minutes at 4 feet from the PX-UV device reduced recovery of C. difficile spores, MRSA, and VRE by 0.55±0.34, 1.85±0.49, and 0.6±0.25 log10 colony-forming units (CFU)/cm2, respectively. Increasing distance from the PX-UV device dramatically reduced killing efficacy, whereas pathogen concentration, organic load, and shading did not. Continuous UV-C achieved significantly greater log10CFU reductions than PX-UV irradiation on glass carriers. On frequently touched surfaces, PX-UV significantly reduced the frequency of positive C. difficile, VRE, and MRSA culture results.

CONCLUSIONS The PX-UV device reduced recovery of MRSA, C. difficile, and VRE on glass carriers and on frequently touched surfaces in hospital rooms with a 10-minute UV exposure time. PX-UV was not more effective than continuous UV-C in reducing pathogen recovery on glass slides, suggesting that both forms of UV have some effectiveness at relatively short exposure times.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2014;00(0): 1–6

(Received July 11 2014)

(Accepted October 14 2014)

To access the report in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/ice.2014.36

Healthcare Associated Infection (HAI) Patented UVC Lighting System Arcalux by Health Risk Management System (HRMS)

The Arcalux® HRMS is a ceiling mounted air disinfection system that doubles as a lighting fixture. The fluorescent HRMS01 uses about 110 watts of energy while the LED HRMS02 uses around 125 watts of energy. The installation process is easy, while maintenance of the lamp and filter are yearly and the ballast requires no tools.

Offering 24/7/365 protection against HAI – causing pathogens, this patented UVC lighting system works unobtrusively changing the air an average of four times an hour without ever disturbing a patient’s rest, quietly defending your staff and patients.

The CDC estimates that 2 million Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs) cause or contribute to 99,000 deaths each year. With HAIs costing the US economy an estimated $45 billion annually, the HRMS is often more cost efficient than most stand-alone surface disinfection systems.

* In the news *

 AGT’s Health Risk Management System (HRMS) installed in Norwood Urgent Care Clinic in Massachusetts

State-of-the art urgent care facility built isolation room to provide enhanced patient treatment

South Bend, Indiana, December 2, 2014 – Norwood Urgent Care Clinic in Norwood, Massachusetts has taken the Health Risk Management System (HRMS) manufactured by American Green Technology ®  (AGT) and built a cutting edge isolation room for potential high risk patients. Unlike most traditional walk-in treatment centers, the Norwood facility has invested heavily in technology like on-site lab testing, cardiac monitoring, CT scan, X-Ray and ultrasound services in order to offer alternative healthcare options to consumers.

“Our goal at Norwood is to set a standard of excellence for urgent care clinics across the U.S.,” said Justin Mavromatis, Operations Director. “We feel the HRMS is an innovative product to add to our repertoire of healthcare technology.  Given the news reports of growing concerns over antibiotic resistant superbugs and the fact we are in the middle of flu season; providing unparalleled patient care is priority one.  We think using an HRMS in our isolation room can help accomplish that goal in urgent care clinics. Norwood Urgent Care will be the facility that is prepared for any medical condition that may arise.”

“Clinics like Norwood are the perfect application for the HRMS,” said Danny Bogar, CEO of AGT. “The HRMS is an environmental disinfection system that effectively purifies the air and reduces the concentration of dangerous surface pathogens like MRSA, influenza and C. difficile which combined kill over 70,000 people each year.”

Located just 25 miles from Boston, Norwood Urgent Care anticipates opening five additional centers surrounding the Greater Boston area in the near future.  To learn more log on to norwoodurgentcare.com.

The HRMS is distributed by Boston-based Improved Illumination who provides energy efficient lighting solutions to forward-thinking healthcare organizations including acute care hospitals, urgent care centers and skilled nursing facilities. 

About American Green Technology:American Green Technology® (AGT) is a company dedicated to developing innovative products to positively impact the health, economy and environment of global communities.  AGT’s Health Risk Management System (HRMS) is a patented UVC lighting product clinically proven to eliminate 99.7% of airborne pathogens that cause Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs) in hospitals or wherever it is installed 

For more information please visit their website:

www.arcaluxhrms.com

 

 
AmericanGreenTechnology

hrms

C. difficile infection, C Diff Foundation’s “Raising C Diff Awareness” program offered

It is with great pleasure to share the news that the C Diff Foundation’s, “Raising C Diff Awareness” program is being offered to over 500 facilities and 1,000 members of the Florida Health Care Association.  On-site scheduling is in progress and can be arranged by contacting the C Diff Foundation office toll free at:

1 – 844 – FORCDIF

Established in 1954, Florida Health Care Association is celebrating its 60th anniversary in 2014. FHCA is a federation representing over 1,000 members and over 500 facilities which provide skilled nursing, post-acute and sub-acute care, short-term rehab, assisted living and other services to the frail elderly and individuals with disabilities in Florida. FHCA membership also includes more than 400 Associate Members, or companies, that provide valuable products and services to long term care providers.

FHCA_60thAnniversaryLogoA(2)

FHCA is the state affiliate of the American Health Care Association/National Center for Assisted Living in Washington, DC. Governed by a Board of Directors, the mission of FHCA is to advance the quality of services, image, professional development and financial stability of its members. FHCA maintains reimbursement, regulatory, clinical and media/public relations experts on staff and makes its legal, business and labor consultants available to all members. FHCA members benefit from a strong, unified presence in the state Capitol, quality improvement and survey support, up-to-date information and continuing education opportunities. Together, these member services work to support member providers and assist the interests of government, the greater health care community and the general public.

To become a member or for additional FHCA information please visit their website:

http://www.fhca.org