Tag Archives: Recurrent C.difficile infection Study

Cephamycin and Vancomycin Prevent C. difficile infection (CDI) recurrence Discovered by Researchers

Abstract

Spore-forming bacteria encompass a diverse range of genera and species, including important human and animal pathogens, and food contaminants. Clostridioides difficile is one such bacterium and is a global health threat because it is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea in hospitals.

A crucial mediator of C. difficile disease initiation, dissemination and re-infection is the formation of spores that are resistant to current therapeutics, which do not target sporulation. Here, we show that cephamycin antibiotics inhibit C. difficile sporulation by targeting spore-specific penicillin-binding proteins.

Using a mouse disease model, we show that combined treatment with the current standard-of-care antibiotic, vancomycin, and a cephamycin prevents disease recurrence.

Cephamycins were found to have broad applicability as an anti-sporulation strategy, as they inhibited sporulation in other spore-forming pathogens, including the food contaminant Bacillus cereus. This study could directly and immediately affect treatment of C. difficile infection and advance drug development to control other important spore-forming bacteria that are problematic in the food industry (B. cereus), are potential bioterrorism agents (Bacillus anthracis) and cause other animal and human infections.

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https://www.nature.com/articles/s41564-019-0519-1

Veteran Affairs Patients with Recurrent C.difficile Infections Participate In Study

 

 

 

 

Though recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) are common and pose a major clinical concern, data are lacking regarding mortality among patients who survive their initial CDI and have subsequent recurrences. Risk factors for mortality in patients with recurrent CDI are largely unknown.

Methods

Veterans Affairs patients with a first CDI (positive C. difficile toxin(s) stool sample and ≥ 2 days CDI treatment) were included (2010–2014). Subsequent recurrences were defined as additional CDI episodes ≥ 14 days after the stool test date and within 30 days of end of treatment. A matched (1:4) case-control analysis was conducted using multivariable conditional logistic regression to identify predictors of all-cause mortality within 30 days of the first recurrence.

Results

Crude 30-day all-cause mortality rates were 10.6% for the initial CDI episode, 8.3% for first recurrence, 4.2% for second recurrence, and 5.9% for third recurrence. Among 110 cases and 440 controls six predictors of mortality were identified: use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, odds ratio [OR] 3.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.14–6.96), any antibiotic (OR 3.33, 95% CI 1.79–6.17), respiratory failure (OR 8.26, 95% CI 1.71–39.92), congitive dysfunction (OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.02–5.72), nutrition deficiency (OR 2.91, 95% CI 1.37–6.21), and age (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01–1.07).

Conclusion

In our national cohort of Veterans, crude mortality decreased by 44% from the initial episode to the third recurrence. Treatment with antibiotics, PPIs, and underlying co-morbidities were important predictors of mortality in recurrent CDI. Our study assists healthcare providers in identifying patients at high risk of death after CDI recurrence.

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https://academic.oup.com/ofid/advance-article/doi/10.1093/ofid/ofy175/5056240