Tag Archives: C. difficile infection

What Is SARS-CoV-2 and the Disease It Causes Named coronavirus disease 2019 or Better Known As COVID-19

 

 

 

What is Coronavirus?

The virus has been named “SARS-CoV-2” and the disease it causes has been named “COVID-19.”

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that may cause respiratory illnesses in humans ranging from common colds to more severe conditions such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS).

‘Novel coronavirus’ is a new, previously unidentified strain of coronavirus. The novel coronavirus involved in the current outbreak has been named SARS-CoV-2 by the World Health Organization (WHO). The disease it causes has been named “coronavirus disease 2019” (or “COVID-19”).

 

LISTEN AT YOUR LEISURE

Special Episode with Dr. Teena Chopra, MD, MPH

and Jennifer Wood, C. diff. Survivor – discussing the COVID-19 and C. difficile infection information

 

How does the virus spread?

COVID-19 can spread from person to person usually through close contact with an infected person or through respiratory droplets that are dispersed into the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes.  It may also be possible to get the virus by touching a surface or object contaminated with the virus and then touching your mouth, nose or eyes, but it is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

 

 

Where has COVID-19 spread to?

As of the March 6, 2020, there are over 95,000 confirmed cases of infection by the virus—and 3,381 of that number have resulted in death. While most cases of COVID-19 infection are in China, the virus has spread to 88 other countries.

What are the symptoms?

Similar to other respiratory illnesses, the symptoms of COVID-19 may include fever, cough, and shortness of breath.

People infected with COVID-19 may experience any range of these symptoms along with aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat and diarrhea. Symptoms can start to show up anywhere from two to 14 days after exposure to the virus3. It may be possible for an infected person who is not yet showing any symptoms to spread the virus. Older persons, and those with pre-existing medical illnesses like heart disease and diabetes, however, seem to be more likely to experience severe respiratory symptoms and complications.

How to protect yourself from coronavirus

The best preventative action is to avoid being exposed to the virus. You can do this by taking a few cautionary steps—the same as you would if you were trying to avoid getting any respiratory illness.

  1. Wash your hands with soap and water frequently. If soap and water are not readily accessible, use alcohol-based sanitizers.
  2. Avoid contact with sick people.
  3. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with your hands if they are unwashed.
  4. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your bent elbow when you sneeze or cough. Make sure to dispose of the tissue immediately.
  5. If you are feeling unwell, stay home.
  6. If you have no respiratory symptoms such cough, a medical mask is not necessary.  Only use the mask if you have symptoms such as coughing or sneezing or suspect a COVID-19 infection. A mask is recommended for those caring for anyone with COVID-19.

What to do if you suspect you are infected?

The symptoms of COVID-19 are very similar to those of a cold or the flu, making it challenging to identify the specific cause of any respiratory symptoms. If you suspect you have been infected by COVID-19, you should seek medical care as soon as possible.

Until you can access medical care, you should follow these guidelines to reduce your likelihood of infecting others:

  • Restrict your outdoor activities and stay at home as much as you can. If it is feasible, stay in a separate room, and use a different bathroom from others in your household.
  • Clean and/or disinfect objects and surfaces that you touch regularly.
  • Track your symptoms as accurately as possible, so you can provide medical personnel with useful information.

Are there any treatments or vaccines?

There are currently no treatments, drugs, or vaccines available to treat or prevent COVID-19. People infected with the virus should receive medical treatment to relieve and alleviate the symptoms they are experiencing.

For Additional Information Please Visit the CDC Website:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/index.html

 

Resource:  https://www.gethealthystayhealthy.com/articles/what-know-about-coronavirus-covid-19-explained

What Is SARS-CoV-2 and the Disease It Causes Named coronavirus disease 2019 or Better Known As COVID-19

 

 

 

What is Coronavirus?

The virus has been named “SARS-CoV-2” and the disease it causes has been named “COVID-19.”

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that may cause respiratory illnesses in humans ranging from common colds to more severe conditions such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS).

‘Novel coronavirus’ is a new, previously unidentified strain of coronavirus. The novel coronavirus involved in the current outbreak has been named SARS-CoV-2 by the World Health Organization (WHO). The disease it causes has been named “coronavirus disease 2019” (or “COVID-19”).

 

LISTEN AT YOUR LEISURE

Special Episode with Dr. Teena Chopra, MD, MPH

and Jennifer Wood, C. diff. Survivor – discussing the COVID-19 and C. difficile infection information

 

How does the virus spread?

COVID-19 can spread from person to person usually through close contact with an infected person or through respiratory droplets that are dispersed into the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes.  It may also be possible to get the virus by touching a surface or object contaminated with the virus and then touching your mouth, nose or eyes, but it is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

 

 

Where has COVID-19 spread to?

As of the March 6, 2020, there are over 95,000 confirmed cases of infection by the virus—and 3,381 of that number have resulted in death. While most cases of COVID-19 infection are in China, the virus has spread to 88 other countries.

What are the symptoms?

Similar to other respiratory illnesses, the symptoms of COVID-19 may include fever, cough, and shortness of breath.

People infected with COVID-19 may experience any range of these symptoms along with aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat and diarrhea. Symptoms can start to show up anywhere from two to 14 days after exposure to the virus3. It may be possible for an infected person who is not yet showing any symptoms to spread the virus. Older persons, and those with pre-existing medical illnesses like heart disease and diabetes, however, seem to be more likely to experience severe respiratory symptoms and complications.

How to protect yourself from coronavirus

The best preventative action is to avoid being exposed to the virus. You can do this by taking a few cautionary steps—the same as you would if you were trying to avoid getting any respiratory illness.

  1. Wash your hands with soap and water frequently. If soap and water are not readily accessible, use alcohol-based sanitizers.
  2. Avoid contact with sick people.
  3. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with your hands if they are unwashed.
  4. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your bent elbow when you sneeze or cough. Make sure to dispose of the tissue immediately.
  5. If you are feeling unwell, stay home.
  6. If you have no respiratory symptoms such cough, a medical mask is not necessary.  Only use the mask if you have symptoms such as coughing or sneezing or suspect a COVID-19 infection. A mask is recommended for those caring for anyone with COVID-19.

What to do if you suspect you are infected?

The symptoms of COVID-19 are very similar to those of a cold or the flu, making it challenging to identify the specific cause of any respiratory symptoms. If you suspect you have been infected by COVID-19, you should seek medical care as soon as possible.

Until you can access medical care, you should follow these guidelines to reduce your likelihood of infecting others:

  • Restrict your outdoor activities and stay at home as much as you can. If it is feasible, stay in a separate room, and use a different bathroom from others in your household.
  • Clean and/or disinfect objects and surfaces that you touch regularly.
  • Track your symptoms as accurately as possible, so you can provide medical personnel with useful information.

Are there any treatments or vaccines?

There are currently no treatments, drugs, or vaccines available to treat or prevent COVID-19. People infected with the virus should receive medical treatment to relieve and alleviate the symptoms they are experiencing.

For Additional Information Please Visit the CDC Website:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/index.html

 

Resource:  https://www.gethealthystayhealthy.com/articles/what-know-about-coronavirus-covid-19-explained

C Diff Foundation with Leading Gastroenterologist’s Oneto and Feuerstadt Announce November Clinic Dedicated for C.difficile

C Diff Foundation ( https://cdifffoundation.org/)  is a one hundred percent volunteer, world-renowned 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization and has announced that the Foundation will offer a November clinic sponsored by the C Diff Foundation and dedicated to patients diagnosed and recovering from a C. difficile infection (CDI).

The November 19th C Diff Foundation Clinic will be hosted by Concorde Gastroenterology at their  233 Broadway Suite 840,  New York, NY 10279 office.
The clinic will hold office hours from 10:00 a.m. until  4:00 p.m. ET
With Doctor’s Caterina Oneto, MD and  Paul Feuerstadt, MD

Please call +1 212 889 5544 Ext 199
To schedule an appointment.

The August clinic received an overwhelming response from patients in various stages of recovery, including 15 individuals already scheduled with multiple spots planned for patients with recently diagnosed infection or those who have had multiple episodes and need further guidance and management.

Dr. Oneto said, “Through this clinic, we will provide access to high-level care to a number of new consults, as well as existing patients, who are recovering from the infection. It is my pleasure to partner with the C Diff Foundation and lend my expertise to the management and hopefully, eradication of this debilitating disease.”

“We are delighted with the immediate and overwhelming response from the patient community. It is a testament to the needs of those suffering from this infection. With this clinic, we hope to bring awareness, education and more importantly, cutting edge treatment to the general public,” stated Dr. Feuerstadt.

There are plans for additional clinic dates in 2020  in Florida, New York, Connecticut, Illinois, and Minnesota.

“The clinics demonstrate Doctor Oneto and Feuerstadt’s commitment over the years raising
C. diff. awareness while providing management of those suffering with
a C. diff. infection. Patients who might not otherwise be able to gain access to providers sub-specializing and caring for those with this infection will have this opportunity available.  Doctor’s Oneto and Feuerstadt’s dedication resonates within the C. diff. community and we are grateful for their participation and support.” stated Nancy Caralla, Founding President and Executive Director of the C Diff Foundation.

About C Diff Foundation

C Diff Foundation’s mission is dedicated to reaching out to communities from villages to cities, to medical practitioners, medical students, C. diff. survivors, caregivers, and the patients combating a C. difficile infection (CDI) while providing the general public important information on prevention, treatments available, clinical trials in progress, nutrition, diagnostics, and EPA registered products available for environmental safety worldwide.

About Caterina Oneto, MD

Dr. Caterina Oneto, MD is a Gastroenterologist in private practice in New York and is affiliated with NYU Langone. She completed her Fellowship in Gastroenterology at Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Oneto is the Co-Director of Clinical trials at Concorde Medical Group. Her main focus is Irritable Bowel Disease (IBD),

About Paul Feuerstadt, MD

His areas of interest Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) and ischemic diseases of the gut and in these areas he has presented his research extensively, authored and co-authored many manuscripts, textbook chapters, and online modules. Another passion of Dr. Feuerstadt is teaching, frequently giving lectures locally, regionally and nationally. He holds a clinical appointment as an Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine and is a full-time attending physician at the Gastroenterology Center of Connecticut seeing patients with a broad spectrum of clinical gastroenterological diseases.

Dr. Feuerstadt attended the Weill Medical College of Cornell University in Manhattan for medical school and completed his residency in internal medicine at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell. His clinical fellowship training was completed at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, New York.

Clostridioides difficile infections (AKA C. diff., C.difficile, CDI) and Microbiome modification.
Dr Oneto is also Co-Director of the C.diff. Community Global Support program offered by the
C Diff Foundation.  Dr. Oneto appears regularly on Doctor Radio on Sirius Xm
and C. diff. Spores and More Radio (cdiffradio.com).

About C.difficile

It is the most common Healthcare-associated infection affecting an estimated 450,000 people annually in the United States alone with ~28,000 deaths from complications of this infection. This infection accounts for ~16% of all healthcare-associated infections.

In the USA: Nearly half a million Americans suffer from Clostridioides difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released on February 25, 2015, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

**Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of C. difficile. Of those, about 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly attributable to C. difficile infections (CDI), making C. difficile a very important cause of infectious disease death in the United States alone. More than 80 percent of the deaths associated with C. difficile occurred among Americans aged 65 years or older. C. difficile causes an inflammation of the colon and deadly diarrhea.

Cephamycin and Vancomycin Prevent C. difficile infection (CDI) recurrence Discovered by Researchers

Abstract

Spore-forming bacteria encompass a diverse range of genera and species, including important human and animal pathogens, and food contaminants. Clostridioides difficile is one such bacterium and is a global health threat because it is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea in hospitals.

A crucial mediator of C. difficile disease initiation, dissemination and re-infection is the formation of spores that are resistant to current therapeutics, which do not target sporulation. Here, we show that cephamycin antibiotics inhibit C. difficile sporulation by targeting spore-specific penicillin-binding proteins.

Using a mouse disease model, we show that combined treatment with the current standard-of-care antibiotic, vancomycin, and a cephamycin prevents disease recurrence.

Cephamycins were found to have broad applicability as an anti-sporulation strategy, as they inhibited sporulation in other spore-forming pathogens, including the food contaminant Bacillus cereus. This study could directly and immediately affect treatment of C. difficile infection and advance drug development to control other important spore-forming bacteria that are problematic in the food industry (B. cereus), are potential bioterrorism agents (Bacillus anthracis) and cause other animal and human infections.

To review abstract in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41564-019-0519-1

Watermelon; A Fruit Filled With Healthy Benefits

The healthy or beneficial effects of watermelon are mainly derived from its unique nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and organic compounds.

These include significant amounts of vitamin C, calcium, magnesium, fiber, protein, and a large amount of potassium. Furthermore, they contain vitamin A, vitamin B6, niacin, thiamin, and a wide variety of carotenoids and phytonutrients, including lycopene.

Did you know that Watermelon is effective in reducing both your body temperature and blood pressure?

Many people in tropical regions eat Watermelon on a daily basis during the summer to protect themselves from heat stroke. The high amount of water found in watermelons also helps in preventing dehydration.  At only 46 calories per cup, it is a beneficial fruit to add into the daily diet, especially during the hot summer weather, before/after a workout and when a patient is being treated for a G.I. diagnosis, such
as a C. difficile infection, that can cause a fluid shift and loss of body fluids.

According to a new study in the Journal of Agricultural Food and Chemistry, drinking watermelon juice before a hard workout helped reduce athletes’ heart rate and next-day muscle soreness. That’s because watermelon is rich in an amino acid called L-citrulline, which the body converts to L-arginine, an essential amino acid that helps relax blood vessels and improve circulation.

The study’s seven participants, all men, were given 17 ounces (500 mL) of either natural watermelon juice, watermelon juice enriched with additional citrulline, or a placebo drink an hour before their workouts. Interestingly, the natural juice was just as effective as the enriched juice. The researchers also determined that intestinal cells can absorb more citrulline from watermelon juice than from citrulline supplements, especially when the juice is unpasteurized.

In just one cup, watermelon has 1.5 times the stuff than a large fresh tomato, 6 milligrams compared to 4 milligrams, according to the USDA. That matters because lycopene is thought to act as a super antioxidant, stopping free radicals from damaging your cells and messing with your immune system.

 

Watermelon can prevent dehydration. Watermelon is 91.5% water, according to the USDA. That’s a big deal seeing as how being dehydrated is bad for your health. A study published in The Journal of Nutrition found that individuals with even mild dehydration experienced headaches, poor concentration, fatigue, and worse moods.

Here are a few cooling and refreshing melon recipes:

Cantaloupe Sherbet
For less than 100 calories, you can enjoy a refreshing dessert. Cantaloupe adds a natural sweetness to the sherbet plus a luscious peach color.

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 large ripe cantaloupe, peeled and finely chopped (about 5 cups)
  • 1/3 cup “measures-like-sugar” calorie-free sweetener
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons unflavored gelatin
  • 1/4 cup cold water
  • 1 (8-ounce) carton vanilla fat-free yogurt sweetened with aspartame
  • Cantaloupe wedge (optional)

HOW to prepare:

  • Combine cantaloupe, and lemon juice in a blender of choice or food processor; process until smooth. Transfer mixture to a medium bowl.
  • Sprinkle gelatin over cold water in a small saucepan; let stand 1 minute. Cook over low heat, stirring until gelatin dissolves, about 4 minutes. Add to cantaloupe mixture, stirring well. Add yogurt, stirring until smooth.
  • Pour mixture into an 8-inch square pan; freeze until almost firm.
  • Transfer mixture to a large bowl; beat with a mixer at high speed until fluffy. Spoon mixture back into pan; freeze until firm.

Watermelon Smoothie

Just 25 calories a 8 ounce serving.

 

 

Ingredients:

  • cup watermelon (cut into cubes)
  • cucumber (peeled and sliced)
  • mint leaves
  • 1/2 cup ice

HOW to prepare:

Place cubed watermelon, one cucumber thinly sliced, two min leaves and 1/2 cup of ice

into blender of choice with 1/4 cup of water.  Blend until smooth.

Pour into glasses and serve.

Freeze remainder of beverage for a refreshing frozen treat.

Watermelon and Ginger-Ale Smoothie

Just 100 calories per 8 ounce serving.

 

 

Ingredients:

 

  • 3 1/2 cups watermelon (cut into cubes and de-seeded)
  • lime
  • 1 1/2 cups ginger ale
  • cups ice

 

HOW to prepare:

Place cubed watermelon, ginger-ale and ice into blender of choice or a food processor.

Blend well and serve.  Garnish with a slice of lemon or lime.

Freeze the remainder beverage for a tasty treat in a freezer safe container.

 

References:

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/08/130820-watermelon-nutrition-health-food-science/