Tag Archives: C. difficile infection

C Diff Foundation with Leading Gastroenterologist’s Oneto and Feuerstadt Announce November Clinic Dedicated for C.difficile

C Diff Foundation ( https://cdifffoundation.org/)  is a one hundred percent volunteer, world-renowned 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization and has announced that the Foundation will offer a November clinic sponsored by the C Diff Foundation and dedicated to patients diagnosed and recovering from a C. difficile infection (CDI).

The November 19th C Diff Foundation Clinic will be hosted by Concorde Gastroenterology at their  233 Broadway Suite 840,  New York, NY 10279 office.
The clinic will hold office hours from 10:00 a.m. until  4:00 p.m. ET
With Doctor’s Caterina Oneto, MD and  Paul Feuerstadt, MD

Please call +1 212 889 5544 Ext 199
To schedule an appointment.

The August clinic received an overwhelming response from patients in various stages of recovery, including 15 individuals already scheduled with multiple spots planned for patients with recently diagnosed infection or those who have had multiple episodes and need further guidance and management.

Dr. Oneto said, “Through this clinic, we will provide access to high-level care to a number of new consults, as well as existing patients, who are recovering from the infection. It is my pleasure to partner with the C Diff Foundation and lend my expertise to the management and hopefully, eradication of this debilitating disease.”

“We are delighted with the immediate and overwhelming response from the patient community. It is a testament to the needs of those suffering from this infection. With this clinic, we hope to bring awareness, education and more importantly, cutting edge treatment to the general public,” stated Dr. Feuerstadt.

There are plans for additional clinic dates in 2020  in Florida, New York, Connecticut, Illinois, and Minnesota.

“The clinics demonstrate Doctor Oneto and Feuerstadt’s commitment over the years raising
C. diff. awareness while providing management of those suffering with
a C. diff. infection. Patients who might not otherwise be able to gain access to providers sub-specializing and caring for those with this infection will have this opportunity available.  Doctor’s Oneto and Feuerstadt’s dedication resonates within the C. diff. community and we are grateful for their participation and support.” stated Nancy Caralla, Founding President and Executive Director of the C Diff Foundation.

About C Diff Foundation

C Diff Foundation’s mission is dedicated to reaching out to communities from villages to cities, to medical practitioners, medical students, C. diff. survivors, caregivers, and the patients combating a C. difficile infection (CDI) while providing the general public important information on prevention, treatments available, clinical trials in progress, nutrition, diagnostics, and EPA registered products available for environmental safety worldwide.

About Caterina Oneto, MD

Dr. Caterina Oneto, MD is a Gastroenterologist in private practice in New York and is affiliated with NYU Langone. She completed her Fellowship in Gastroenterology at Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Oneto is the Co-Director of Clinical trials at Concorde Medical Group. Her main focus is Irritable Bowel Disease (IBD),

About Paul Feuerstadt, MD

His areas of interest Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) and ischemic diseases of the gut and in these areas he has presented his research extensively, authored and co-authored many manuscripts, textbook chapters, and online modules. Another passion of Dr. Feuerstadt is teaching, frequently giving lectures locally, regionally and nationally. He holds a clinical appointment as an Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine and is a full-time attending physician at the Gastroenterology Center of Connecticut seeing patients with a broad spectrum of clinical gastroenterological diseases.

Dr. Feuerstadt attended the Weill Medical College of Cornell University in Manhattan for medical school and completed his residency in internal medicine at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell. His clinical fellowship training was completed at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, New York.

Clostridioides difficile infections (AKA C. diff., C.difficile, CDI) and Microbiome modification.
Dr Oneto is also Co-Director of the C.diff. Community Global Support program offered by the
C Diff Foundation.  Dr. Oneto appears regularly on Doctor Radio on Sirius Xm
and C. diff. Spores and More Radio (cdiffradio.com).

About C.difficile

It is the most common Healthcare-associated infection affecting an estimated 450,000 people annually in the United States alone with ~28,000 deaths from complications of this infection. This infection accounts for ~16% of all healthcare-associated infections.

In the USA: Nearly half a million Americans suffer from Clostridioides difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released on February 25, 2015, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

**Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of C. difficile. Of those, about 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly attributable to C. difficile infections (CDI), making C. difficile a very important cause of infectious disease death in the United States alone. More than 80 percent of the deaths associated with C. difficile occurred among Americans aged 65 years or older. C. difficile causes an inflammation of the colon and deadly diarrhea.

Cephamycin and Vancomycin Prevent C. difficile infection (CDI) recurrence Discovered by Researchers

Abstract

Spore-forming bacteria encompass a diverse range of genera and species, including important human and animal pathogens, and food contaminants. Clostridioides difficile is one such bacterium and is a global health threat because it is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea in hospitals.

A crucial mediator of C. difficile disease initiation, dissemination and re-infection is the formation of spores that are resistant to current therapeutics, which do not target sporulation. Here, we show that cephamycin antibiotics inhibit C. difficile sporulation by targeting spore-specific penicillin-binding proteins.

Using a mouse disease model, we show that combined treatment with the current standard-of-care antibiotic, vancomycin, and a cephamycin prevents disease recurrence.

Cephamycins were found to have broad applicability as an anti-sporulation strategy, as they inhibited sporulation in other spore-forming pathogens, including the food contaminant Bacillus cereus. This study could directly and immediately affect treatment of C. difficile infection and advance drug development to control other important spore-forming bacteria that are problematic in the food industry (B. cereus), are potential bioterrorism agents (Bacillus anthracis) and cause other animal and human infections.

To review abstract in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41564-019-0519-1

Watermelon; A Fruit Filled With Healthy Benefits

The healthy or beneficial effects of watermelon are mainly derived from its unique nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and organic compounds.

These include significant amounts of vitamin C, calcium, magnesium, fiber, protein, and a large amount of potassium. Furthermore, they contain vitamin A, vitamin B6, niacin, thiamin, and a wide variety of carotenoids and phytonutrients, including lycopene.

Did you know that Watermelon is effective in reducing both your body temperature and blood pressure?

Many people in tropical regions eat Watermelon on a daily basis during the summer to protect themselves from heat stroke. The high amount of water found in watermelons also helps in preventing dehydration.  At only 46 calories per cup, it is a beneficial fruit to add into the daily diet, especially during the hot summer weather, before/after a workout and when a patient is being treated for a G.I. diagnosis, such
as a C. difficile infection, that can cause a fluid shift and loss of body fluids.

According to a new study in the Journal of Agricultural Food and Chemistry, drinking watermelon juice before a hard workout helped reduce athletes’ heart rate and next-day muscle soreness. That’s because watermelon is rich in an amino acid called L-citrulline, which the body converts to L-arginine, an essential amino acid that helps relax blood vessels and improve circulation.

The study’s seven participants, all men, were given 17 ounces (500 mL) of either natural watermelon juice, watermelon juice enriched with additional citrulline, or a placebo drink an hour before their workouts. Interestingly, the natural juice was just as effective as the enriched juice. The researchers also determined that intestinal cells can absorb more citrulline from watermelon juice than from citrulline supplements, especially when the juice is unpasteurized.

In just one cup, watermelon has 1.5 times the stuff than a large fresh tomato, 6 milligrams compared to 4 milligrams, according to the USDA. That matters because lycopene is thought to act as a super antioxidant, stopping free radicals from damaging your cells and messing with your immune system.

 

Watermelon can prevent dehydration. Watermelon is 91.5% water, according to the USDA. That’s a big deal seeing as how being dehydrated is bad for your health. A study published in The Journal of Nutrition found that individuals with even mild dehydration experienced headaches, poor concentration, fatigue, and worse moods.

Here are a few cooling and refreshing melon recipes:

Cantaloupe Sherbet
For less than 100 calories, you can enjoy a refreshing dessert. Cantaloupe adds a natural sweetness to the sherbet plus a luscious peach color.

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 large ripe cantaloupe, peeled and finely chopped (about 5 cups)
  • 1/3 cup “measures-like-sugar” calorie-free sweetener
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons unflavored gelatin
  • 1/4 cup cold water
  • 1 (8-ounce) carton vanilla fat-free yogurt sweetened with aspartame
  • Cantaloupe wedge (optional)

HOW to prepare:

  • Combine cantaloupe, and lemon juice in a blender of choice or food processor; process until smooth. Transfer mixture to a medium bowl.
  • Sprinkle gelatin over cold water in a small saucepan; let stand 1 minute. Cook over low heat, stirring until gelatin dissolves, about 4 minutes. Add to cantaloupe mixture, stirring well. Add yogurt, stirring until smooth.
  • Pour mixture into an 8-inch square pan; freeze until almost firm.
  • Transfer mixture to a large bowl; beat with a mixer at high speed until fluffy. Spoon mixture back into pan; freeze until firm.

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Watermelon Smoothie

Just 25 calories a 8 ounce serving.

 

 

Ingredients:

  • cup watermelon (cut into cubes)
  • cucumber (peeled and sliced)
  • mint leaves
  • 1/2 cup ice

HOW to prepare:

Place cubed watermelon, one cucumber thinly sliced, two min leaves and 1/2 cup of ice

into blender of choice with 1/4 cup of water.  Blend until smooth.

Pour into glasses and serve.

Freeze remainder of beverage for a refreshing frozen treat.

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Watermelon and Ginger-Ale Smoothie

Just 100 calories per 8 ounce serving.

 

 

Ingredients:

 

  • 3 1/2 cups watermelon (cut into cubes and de-seeded)
  • lime
  • 1 1/2 cups ginger ale
  • cups ice

 

HOW to prepare:

Place cubed watermelon, ginger-ale and ice into blender of choice or a food processor.

Blend well and serve.  Garnish with a slice of lemon or lime.

Freeze the remainder beverage for a tasty treat in a freezer safe container.

 

References:

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/08/130820-watermelon-nutrition-health-food-science/

C.difficile (C.diff.) Infections Continue to Grow in Health Care Facilities Worldwide

The burden of Clostridium difficile (C. diff) continues to grow in health care facilities throughout the United States and around the world.

Gaining a better understanding of sources and risk factors for C. diff can help reverse colonization and transmission or prevent it altogether, authors of a new paper suggest.

To view the article in its entirety, please click on the following link to be redirected:

http://www.contagionlive.com/news/exploring-microbiome-changes-associated-with-c-diff-to-prevent-or-reverse-colonization

“This is a review/commentary article that provides a high-level overview of the literature dealing with C. diff colonization and the microbiome changes associated with C. diff colonization,” author Silvia Munoz-Price, MD, PhD, from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee told our sister publication MD Magazine.

After reviewing the literature, authors of the study postulated that when it comes to the potential for C. diff colonization, exposure to and transmissions of the virus occurs outside of hospitals. In fact, it seemed like most of the patients became symptomatic during their hospital stay, rather than acquiring the virus while hospitalized.

For example, the investigators cited one study from Canada that had been conducted from 2006 to 2007 where more than 4000 patients were screened for C. diff colonization upon hospitalization, during their stay (on a weekly basis) and at discharge. They found that 4% of the patients were colonized upon hospitalization and 3% acquired C. diff during their stay in the hospital.

The authors also found evidence indicating that community-acquired C. diff appears to be on the rise. The authors discuss a decade-long study which took place in Minnesota where community-acquired C. diff infection rates rose from 2.8 to 14.9 per 100,000-person-years within the 10-year span. The patients in that study more likely to acquire C. diff were younger, female, and healthier than patients with hospitalization acquired C. diff. The reviewers also said that rates of community-acquired C. diff have also been rising in Finland, Australia, and England, according to published studies.

Most of the common risk factors for community-acquired C. diff infections still applied, the researchers found, including antibiotic exposure, household contact, and animals. A 2013 study showed that two-thirds of community-acquired C. difficile patients were exposed to antibiotics in the preceding 12 weeks of their infection, and about one-third had been exposed to proton pump inhibitors.

While studies examining transmissibility within households are difficult to come by, the study authors found one review from Quebec. The review consisted of 2222 cases of C. diff diagnosed between 1998 and 2009, and investigators found that 8 cases were designated to be transmitted by household contacts. However, the researchers noted, confirmation using strain typing was not performed in that study.

Looking at farm livestock, a 2013 Dutch study showed that individuals with daily contact with pigs showed rates of C. diff positivity of 25%; in those with weekly contact, it was 14%. In the same study, C. diff was found in the manure from all the farms in 10% to 80% of the samples per farm. The reviewers also said that C. diff has been found in the stool of farm chickens, calves, and retail ground meat. Dogs and cats are also known to culture positive for C. diff, and the researchers wrote that the bacteria can also be present in vegetables and water (tap water, swimming pools, as well as rivers, lakes, and seas). They hypothesized that the presence of C. diff in vegetables may come from the use of organic fertilizer.

“We envision that in the future we should be able to take advantage of our increasing knowledge about microbiome changes so that we will be able to: identify patients at risk for de novo C. difficile colonization during their hospitalization and manipulate our patients’ microbiome to prevent or reverse C. difficile colonization,” Dr. Munoz-Price said.

“Different from what we do now, the latter would be accomplished not by withholding or changing antibiotics but by correcting the deficient flora of a patient in an individualized fashion. This new approach would revolutionize the field of Infection Control and Antibiotic Stewardship,” she concluded.

Researchers Find Health Care Costs Associated With a Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI) and Recurrent CDI Shows a Significant Increase

 

“This study is consistent with previous literature that has demonstrated a significant and substantial increase in health care resource utilization for CDI over and above similar patients without CDI,” researcher Dongmu Zhang, PhD, of Merck’s Center for Observational and Real-World Evidence, and colleagues wrote. “It has also shown that having rCDI is associated with substantial health care resource use as compared to similar CDI patients who do not have a recurrence.”

To estimate costs and time of hospitalization associated with CDI and rCDI, the researchers conducted a retrospective observational study. They assessed patient records using databases of commercial and Medicare health care claims. Both databases included information on demographics, diagnoses and prescriptions, among other data.

The researchers matched patients without CDI to those with the infection in a 1:1 ratio to estimate costs and lengths of hospital stay due to primary CDI. They then matched patients with primary CDI 1:1 to those with rCDI in a similar comparison. Each patient was followed for 6 months.

The study included records for 55,504 patients diagnosed with CDI between

July 2010 and July 2014.

The mean patient age was 61.3 years,

62% of patients were women.

Nearly a quarter of patients — 24.8% — had rCDI.

The estimated cumulative hospital stays due to CDI and rCDI were 5.2 days and 1.95 days, respectively.

The estimated health care costs due to CDI and rCDI were $24,205 and $10,580, respectively.

Zhang and colleagues said the data show that clinicians must act to control CDI.

“The health care resource utilization and economic burden associated with primary and rCDI are quite substantial,” they wrote. “Better prevention and treatment of CDI, especially rCDI, are needed.” – by Joe Green

 

To read the article in full entirety please click on the following link:

https://www.healio.com/infectious-disease/nosocomial-infections/news/in-the-journals/%7Bce566ea4-98f0-41d3-a8a3-6e0f2125e3dc%7D/cdi-costs-approach-25000-per-patient

C diff Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology Initiative Helps Reduce CDI Rates in VA Facilities

A significant decrease in rates of clinically confirmed long-term care facility onset Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) at 132 Veteran’s Affairs facilities coincided with implementation of a nationwide prevention initiative, researchers report in a new study in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

The initiative for prevention of CDI in VA long-term care facilities (LTCFs) was implemented in February 2014 following implementation in VA acute care facilities in July 2012. The initiative, which emphasizes environmental management, hand hygiene, contact precautions, and institutional culture change, was extended and tailored to VA LTCFs because they are often linked to VA acute care facilities, where CDI has become the most common healthcare-associated infection. To evaluate the impact of the initiative, the researchers analyzed quarterly CDI trends from the first 33 months of the program and compared them with the 2 years prior to implementation.

The analysis found that there were 137,289 admissions, 9,288,098 resident days, and 1,373 clinically confirmed LTCF-onset CDI cases from April 2014 through December 2016.

The nationwide number of clinically confirmed LTCF-onset CDI cases did not change in the 2 years prior to implementation of the prevention initiative but decreased by 36.1% over the 33-month analysis period.

The results mirror the experience in VA acute care facilities, which saw a 15% drop in hospital-acquired CDI cases over the first 33 months of the prevention initiative, and the authors note that this may have had an impact on their findings, along with strong leadership from the VA Central Office and individual facility accountability.

“The exact reason for the decrease in cases within the VA LTCFs is not known,” they write. “Given the large number of facilities involved and the long observation period, we were not able to collect data on individual facility activities or sustainability of activities; hence, we cannot report a ‘magic bullet’ responsible for the declining trend.”

Study shows substantial burden of primary, recurrent C diff

In another study on CDI, researchers with Merck’s Center for Observational and Real World Evidence estimated the healthcare resource utilization (HCRU) and costs attributable to primary CDI and recurrent CDI (rCDI).

In the retrospective observational study, published in Clinical Infectious Diseases, the researchers analyzed administrative claims data from two commercial databases representing nearly 50 million individuals with private health insurance.

To obtain hospitalized days and costs attributable to primary CDI, patients without CDI were matched 1:1 by propensity score to those with primary CDI but no recurrences. To obtain hospitalized days and costs associated with rCDI, patients with primary CDI but no recurrences were matched 1:1 to those with primary CDI plus one recurrence.

A total of 55,504 CDI patients were identified from July 2010 through June 2014, and among those patients 24.8% had a recurrence. Compared to those patients without CDI, the cumulative hospitalized days and healthcare costs attributable to primary CDI were 5.20 days and $24,205. Compared to those patients with primary CDI only, the cumulative hospitalized days and healthcare costs attributable to rCDI were 1.95 days and $10,580.

“In conclusion, the HCRU and economic burden associated with primary and rCDI are quite substantial,” the authors write. “Better prevention and treatment of CDI, especially rCDI, are needed.”

To read article in its entirety please click on the following link:  http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2018/01/stewardship-resistance-scan-jan-22-2018

 

Rebiotix and the C Diff Foundation Applaud the State of Minnesota as it Declares November C. difficile Infection Awareness Month

 Rebiotix Inc., a clinical-stage microbiome company focused on harnessing the power of the human microbiome to treat challenging diseases, and the C Diff Foundation have joined today to voice support for the State of Minnesota in declaring November “C. difficile Infection Awareness Month.

Rebiotix and the C Diff Foundation believe this important action by Governor Mark Dayton and his administration adds significant weight to the ongoing effort to prevent and treat Clostridium difficile infection (C. diff.), which is a national health concern resulting in more than 500,000 infections and 29,000 deaths annually.

C. diff infection is a debilitating and potentially life-threatening condition that is now recognized as the number one healthcare associated infection in the U.S.,” said Lee Jones, president and CEO of Rebiotix.  “Increasing the awareness of this disease is important.  We applaud both the C Diff Foundation and the State of Minnesota in its effort to build awareness of this significant health concern and welcome the opportunity to be at the forefront of developing a potentially new treatment for patients to address the most challenging of C. diff infections.”

Rebiotix’s first product, RBX2660,  is intended to prevent recurrent C. diff infections. RBX2660 is currently the subject of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 3 clinical trial to evaluate its efficacy and safety for the prevention of recurrent C. diff infection and is Rebiotix’s most clinically advanced drug product developed from the company’s Microbiota Restoration Therapy™ (MRT) platform.   Rebiotix is also advancing RBX7455, a lyophilized, non-frozen, oral capsule formulation of its MRT technology in an investigator sponsored Phase 1 study for the prevention of recurrent C. diff infection.

“The ability to prevent and potentially eradicate recurrent C. diff infection requires leadership from across the landscape of healthcare, from government institutions to advocacy to academia to emerging biotechnology companies,” said Nancy Caralla, founder of the C Diff Foundation.  “We commend the State of Minnesota and Rebiotix as each seeks to play an important role in reducing the rate and impact of C. diff infection.”

About Clostridium difficile Infection
Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infection is a serious and potentially fatal gastrointestinal disease, characterized by severe diarrhea, fever, and loss of appetite. It is a leading healthcare-associated infection (HAI), and in the U.S. alone, there are about 500,000 people infected and over 29,000 deaths annually from the disease. Currently, 20-30% of patients with C. diff. go on to experience more than one episode of the disease, which is known as recurrent C. diff. infection. Recurrent C. diff. infection is especially challenging to treat as, to date, there are no approved microbial-based drugs to treat patients with two or more recurrences.

About the C Diff Foundation
The C Diff Foundation, a 501(c) (3)  non-profit organization, established in 2012, and comprised of 100% volunteering professionals dedicated at supporting public health through education and advocating for C. difficile infection (CDI) prevention, treatments, environmental safety, and support worldwide.  The Foundation’s founder is a Nurse and after suffering through C. difficile infections herself and witnessing the loss of her Father, whose life was claimed by C. difficile involvement, the C Diff Foundation came to fruition.  The C Diff Foundation Members, with  their Volunteer Patient Advocates, successfully “Raise C. diff. Awareness”  nationwide and in fifty-six  (56) countries and host a U.S. Nationwide information Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) to support health care providers, patients, and families manage through the difficulties of a C. diff. infection among many other programs.

About Rebiotix Inc.
Rebiotix Inc. is a late-stage clinical microbiome company focused on harnessing the power of the human microbiome to revolutionize the treatment of challenging diseases. Rebiotix possesses a deep and diverse clinical pipeline, with its lead drug candidate, RBX2660, in Phase 3 clinical development for the prevention of recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infection.  RBX2660 has been granted Fast Track status and Breakthrough Therapy designation from the FDA for its potential to prevent recurrent C. diff. infection. Rebiotix’s clinical pipeline also features RBX7455, a lyophilized non-frozen, oral capsule formulation, which is currently the subject of an investigator-sponsored Phase 1 trial for the prevention of recurrent C. diff. infection.  In addition, Rebiotix is targeting several other disease states with drug products built on its pioneering Microbiota Restoration Therapy (MRT) platform.  MRT is a standardized, stabilized drug technology that is designed to rehabilitate the human microbiome by delivering a broad consortium of live microbes into a patient’s intestinal tract via a ready-to-use and easy-to-administer format. For more information on Rebiotix and its pipeline of human microbiome-directed therapies, visit www.rebiotix.com.