Tag Archives: Cdifficile study

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Dr. Sahil Khanna, M.B.B.S.

We are pleased to welcome Dr. Sahil Khanna
as a Member of the C Diff Foundation and Medical Advisory Board.

Dr. Sahil Khanna is an Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. He is directing the Comprehensive Gastroenterology Interest group,
C. difficile Clinic, Fecal Microbiota Transplantation program and
C. difficile related Clinical Trials at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

He completed Medical School at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi; followed by Post Doctoral Research at University of California San Diego, CA; residency in Internal Medicine and Fellowship in Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN before joining the Faculty. He also completed Masters in Clinical and Translational Sciences during his fellowship. His research and clinical interests include Epidemiology, Outcomes and Emerging Therapeutics for Clostridium difficile infection, an arena in which he has had numerous publications and presentations.

Dr. Khanna has over 100 peer-reviewed publications and serves as reviewer and on the editorial board of several journals. He has won numerous awards including the Miles and Shirley Fiterman Award, Mayo Brothers Distinguished Fellowship Award, Donald C. Balfour Mayo Clinic Alumni Association Research Award, Hartz Foundation Young Investigators’ Scholarship and the Most Distinguished Resident Physician Award from the American Association of Physicians of Indian Origin.

First Time Clostridioides difficile Infection Study Reveals Correlation Between Antibiotic Use and CDI Utilizing Data From 2006-2012

ABSTRACT :   Association between Antibiotic Use and Hospital-Onset Clostridioides difficile Infection in U.S. Acute Care Hospitals, 2006-2012: an Ecologic Analysis

“> Sophia V Kazakova, M.D., M.P.H, Ph.D James Baggs, Ph.D L Clifford McDonald, M.D Sarah H Yi, Ph.D Kelly M Hatfield, M.S.P.H Alice Guh, M.D., M.P.H Sujan C Reddy, M.D., M.Sc John A Jernigan, M.D., M.S

Clinical Infectious Diseases, ciz169, https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciz169
Published:
01 March 2019
Article history

Abstract

Background

Unnecessary antibiotic use (AU) contributes to increased rates of Clostridioides difficile Infection (CDI). The impact of antibiotic restriction on hospital-onset CDI (HO-CDI) has not been assessed in a large group of U.S. acute care hospitals (ACHs).

Methods

We examined cross-sectional and temporal associations between rates of hospital-level AU and HO-CDI using data from 549 ACHs. HO-CDI, a discharge with a secondary ICD-9-CM for CDI (008.45) and treatment with metronidazole or oral vancomycin ≥ 3 days after admission. Analyses were performed using multivariable generalized estimating equation models adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics.

Results

During 2006-2012, the unadjusted annual rates of HO-CDI and total AU were 7.3 per 10,000 patient-days (PD) (95% CI: 7.1-7.5) and 811 days of therapy (DOT)/1,000 PD (95% CI: 803-820), respectively. In the cross-sectional analysis, for every 50 DOT/1,000 PD increase in total AU, there was a 4.4% increase in HO-CDI.

For every 10 DOT/1,000 PD increase in use of third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins or carbapenems there was a 2.1% and 2.9% increase in HO-CDI, respectively. In the time-series analysis, the 6 ACHs with a ≥ 30% decrease in total AU had a 33% decrease in HO-CDI (rate ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.47-0.96); ACHs with a ≥ 20% decrease in fluoroquinolone or third- and fourth-generation cephalosporin use had a corresponding decrease in HO-CDI of 8% and 13%, respectively.

Conclusions

At an ecologic level, reductions in total AU, use of fluoroquinolones and third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins were each associated with decreased HO-CDI rates.

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Thank you.

https://academic.oup.com/cid/advance-article/doi/10.1093/cid/ciz169/5367464?fbclid=IwAR0S6XfRWoKTJNmBoZLQicy2BqzuOOyRF9dx2ctQGRn0K9K0m79cr7Or7pQ