Category Archives: C Diff Foundation

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Mena Boules, MD


The C Diff Foundation welcomes Mena Boules, MD.  Dr. Boules joins the Foundation in a volunteer role: non-executive,
Director Of the Educational Healthcare Outreach Program, In this capacity, Dr. Boules will have responsibilities as an organizational advisor, a leading participant in the educational healthcare outreach program developing initiatives to be shared within the healthcare community.

Dr. Boules received his medical degree from the University Of Alexandria Faculty of Medicine. He spent many years at the Cleveland Clinic for clinical training and research in the field of general surgery, bariatric surgery, and surgical endoscopy, and gastroenterology. Since then he has joined the pharmaceutical industry and has served in several roles within US Medical affairs in gastroenterology, and the growing field of the microbiome. Currently, Dr. Boules is Medical Director in Gastroenterology US Medical Affairs at Takeda Pharmaceuticals.

Patient, Family, Caregiver January Symposium Broadcasts During March On C. diff. Spores and More Live Program

CDIFFRADIO.COM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAVE THE DATES to listen in to the leading topic expert presentations

shared on January 15, 2021, at the Patient, Family, Caregiver Symposium:

Beginning Tuesday, March 9 from 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. EST following through on

March 16,  March 23, and  March 30.

A Symposium specifically developed for Patients Diagnosed With a C. diff. Infection, Being Treated For a Clostridioides diffiicile infection, Recovering From a Clostridioides difficile Infection and Recurrences with Family Members and Caregivers.

The Patient & Family C. diff. Symposium was a gathering of healthcare professionals, keynote speakers, health advocates, practitioners, educators, thought leaders, and patients who are transforming the patient experience and changing the way people experience
C. diff. infections worldwide.

Unlike other conferences on this topic, patients will share their C. diff. infection journeys, providing a real-world perspective on patient experience. Our attendees will learn more from this virtual-online symposium and gain knowledge on important topics that will better aid their care and recovery through tools and strategies delivered by keynote speakers.  

The Symposium followed the C Diff Foundation Mission statement –   Educating and Advocating for the prevention, treatments, clinical trials, diagnostics, and environmental safety of Clostridioides difficile
(C. diff.) infections worldwide.

Keynote speakers presented up-to-date data to expand on the existing knowledge and provide important information focused on, yet not limited to,  a Clostridioides difficile infection (also known as C. diff., C. difficile, CDAD, CDI) ……

  • Prevention
  • Treatments
  • Diagnostics
  • Research
  • Environmental Safety
  • Clinical trials and studies

WITH

  • Introduction to Microbiome Research and Studies
  • Infection Prevention
  • Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants
  • Antibiotic Stewardship

We hope you enjoy the broadcasts!

 

Program Chair:  Paul Feuerstadt, MD, FACG

Barbara McGovern, MD     “Treatment of recurrent C. difficile infection with                                                                                        SER-109, an investigational microbiome drug.”

Paul Feuerstadt, MD          ” C. diff. Overview – What is a C. diff. Infection?”

Sahil Khanna, MD               “C. diff. Treatments + FMT Overview. “

 

 

 

Simon Cutting, Ph. D.         “Bacillus, and C. diff.  Spore Overview. “

Teena Chopra, MD                ” Introduction to Infection Prevention.”

Doe Kley, RN, MPH              “C. diff. Transitioning from Hospital to Home. “

Courtney Jones                    ” Microbiome, Microbiota, and Gut Health.”

Denise Cardo, MD                “Everyone Has a Role in Antibiotic Awareness.”

Larry Kociolek, MD              “C. diff. Infections in Pediatrics.”

Kathy Bischoff                        “My C. diff.  Journey.”

Renata Johnson                      “My C. diff. Journey.”

Paul Feuerstadt, MD      &    Barbara McGovern, MD

 

This Symposium was hosted by the C Diff Foundation and

Sponsored by Seres Therapeutics  

Please — Do Not Take Medicine Into Your Own Hands, You Are NOT Out Of Options

Do-It-Yourself Treatments Could Be Fatal……

You are NOT out of options………………………

During these unprecedented times, we understand the patient’s frustration and how this pandemic has created a halt to the readily accessible alternative treatment option in the FMT community.   The need for continued treatments for a C. diff. infection and recurrent C. diff. infections are real and necessary. We also understand how patients experiencing
recurrent C. difficile infections are desperately seeking the FMT alternative treatment.

C Diff Foundation is able to provide information about treatments available to safely treat  CDI’s and recurrent C. diff. infections.

Most home remedies or natural therapies, though, haven’t been put through the same rigorous clinical testing you expect from pharmaceutical medications.

In a world where you can fix almost anything with a do-it-yourself video on YouTube, you might think curing your own illness would be a piece of cake. It might be if it weren’t for a couple of (not so small) sticking points.  One, the home remedy recommended by your friend — or one of the many websites promoting “natural therapies” — might not work.1  Dr. Harriet Hall, a retired family physician, former Air Force flight surgeon, and author of the SkepDoc column in Skeptic magazine, is one of those leading the charge against medical “treatments” not supported by science.  Like others in the medical and scientific community, ……. There is the only medicine that has been tested and proven to work, and medicine that hasn’t,” Hall told Healthline. 1

Talk to your medical professional/s.

Discuss medications and clinical trials available.

Do Not Share Antibiotics.

Responses to an anonymous online questionnaire of 496 parents, researchers at the Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York reported that 48 percent of the parents surveyed said they’ve held onto leftover antibiotics. More troubling to researchers was that of those parents, 73 percent reported giving those antibiotics to siblings, unrelated children, and unrelated adults.  This would sometimes occur months after the drugs were originally prescribed.
Dr. Ruth Milanaik, director of the neonatal neurodevelopment follow-up program at Cohen and senior author of the study, says the results show an “alarming” percentage of parents engaging in sharing or borrowing antibiotics, a practice known as prescription diversion.  “This is dangerous not only for those given antibiotics that weren’t prescribed for them but for entire populations of people who some antibiotics may no longer help when the bacteria they target become resistant to them,” Milanaik said in a statement. 2

Discuss Resources available.

Times are trying during these unprecedented times and you are not without hope – we would like to help you and not see you get hurt or even worse. Please take time to speak to your treating physician and consider contacting a C Diff Foundation Triage Nurse at 727-205-3922 to learn more about safe and effective treatments available and options available to you at this time of desperation.

Remember – You  Are Not Out of Options.

Stay safe – and please – Do NOT take medicine into your own hands.

Thank You!

Resources:
1 Foxnews.com
2 Healthline.com

 

 

Racing the Tract app Is An Educational Game For All Ages

 

 

 

 

Created by Teena Chopra, MD, MPH

Racing The Tract

Available on Apple Store

‎Educational, fun, and free! Welcome to Racing the Tract, a fun and educational game that teaches you how to maintain a healthy Gut Microbiome by making healthy diet and lifestyle choices, and answering trivia questions. Make it to the end of the race track by gaining good bacteria points.

Cost:  FREE

 

Thanksgiving 2020

 

 

 

 

A Bit of History……..
Thanksgiving Day, annual national holiday in the United States and Canada celebrating the harvest and other blessings of the past year. Americans generally believe that their Thanksgiving is modeled on a 1621 harvest feast shared by the English colonists (Pilgrims) of Plymouth and the Wampanoag people.

The Thanksgiving holiday holds special memories and meanings to everyone.  This year the landscape of gatherings, and the social event has changed.  We continue following guidelines to maintain our health, ward off acquiring the virus, keeping our children, families, and loved ones safe, as we continue maneuvering our way through these turbulent times caused by the Global COVID-19  virus  pandemic.  

On February 11, 2020, the World Health Organization announced an official name for the disease that is causing the 2019 novel coronavirus outbreak. The new name of this disease is coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated as COVID-19. In COVID-19, ‘CO’ stands for ‘corona,’ ‘VI’ for ‘virus,’ and ‘D’ for disease. Formerly, this disease was referred to as “2019 novel coronavirus” or “2019-nCoV.”  SARS-CoV-2 virus is a beta coronavirus, like MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV. Coronaviruses, named for the crown-like spikes on their surfaces, are a large family of viruses that are common in people and many different species of animals, including camels, cattle, cats, and bats. (1)

Our members reach out to you, your families, your friends, and associates with heart-felt greetings as we social-distance, visit through ZOOM, Facebook Messenger, and every app. available allowing us to virtually spend time with others.   The way we connect  for education, for business, for doctor visits, and in our families has changed.  This Thanksgiving holiday gathering, along with special occasions earlier this year and the ones that are on the horizon, have a different landscape, a different feel to them, a different content.  The one thing that has NOT changed?  The love that we express through emails, through live online events, for the apps. we are utilizing to see others that mean so much to us.  So today, let’s give thanks for the technology that has been created and that is available to us to connect virtually right now, while the scientists and medical science professionals continue working at developing a vaccine that will keep us safe, that will bring us all back together.  It is what we do today that will make a significant difference tomorrow.

We share the gratitude for family members, for friends, and for the care teams, for the treatments and clinical trials available today to help resolve and prevent a C. diff.  infection, recurrent C. diff. infections, along with the many wellness-draining diagnosis that our bodies endure at one time or another.  Thank you, and a shout-out to the Infection Preventionists across the globe joining us during the annual campaign,   “November is Raising C. diff. Awareness Month.” Thank you to the many State Governors proclaiming November Is Raising Clostridioides difficile Awareness Month.  We are profoundly grateful!

Every day the gratitude pours out to the healthcare professionals devoting their lives to medical science, the research and development teams, the individuals and colleagues who give it their all in order to turn the infections around to improve our health safely, and effectively with  products being developed.  Through clinical trials, and  the organizations enrolling individuals today,  C. diff. infection studies for initial infections, recurrent C. diff. infections, and for the prevention of a C. diff. infection — you help them – to help you – to help others.    You are NOT out of options!

As the Thanksgiving holiday arrives this year we send our best wishes, with an abundance of gratitude, to you, your family, friends, and to the health care professionals visiting the website, participating in the online events this year, for joining us at the 8th Annual International C. diff. Virtual Conference and Health EXPO, and for reaching out to us by telephone, emails, and for being part of the C Diff Foundation programs worldwide.  We are here to help you through this infection, to continue recovering from this infection, to help others learn more about C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, clinical trials, diagnostics, environmental safety, and support around the globe.   “Thank You.”

“None of us can do this alone ~ all of us can do this together.”

Sending warm Thanksgiving wishes,

C Diff Foundation Members Worldwide

 

 

 

 

 

(1) CDC https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/cdcresponse/about-COVID-19.html