Tag Archives: Antibiotic resistance

Clifford McDonald, MD and Alison Laufer-Halpin, Ph.D., of the CDC Discuss the Human Microbiome on C. diff. Spores and More

C Diff Foundation’s “C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network” is honored to announce Doctors McDonald and Laufer-Halpin as our guest speakers on

Tuesday, July 25, 2017 at 10 a.m. PT / 1 p.m. ET

(www.cdiffradio.com)

These two leading topic experts will be discussing significant ways to unlock the mysteries of the human microbiome; how it affects our health, the immune system, and why it is so important to protect it.

As part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) efforts to protect patients and slow antibiotic-resistance, the CDC is investing in research to discover and develop new ways to prevent antibiotic-resistant infections.

To Listen To the Podcast – click on the following link:

https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/100322/the-human-microbiome-how-it-works-how-it-affects-your-health-your-immune-system-and-why-it-is

 

Learn more about C Diff Radio at: http://www.cdiffradio.com/.

Two UK Researchers, Prof.Alistair Leanord and Dr. David Enoch, Present CDI Data At the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID)

Repeated infection with the bacterium Clostridium difficile (C. difficile, C.diff.), which causes abdominal pain, fever, diarrhea is linked to higher death rates, as well as having a significant impact on health services in terms of cost and hospital beds occupied.

In the first of two presentations at the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) (tomorrow (Saturday), Professor Alistair Leanord, from Glasgow University, UK, will say that in Scotland the extra impact on the health service from C. difficile infections amounted to 10,600 bed days a year. “This is the equivalent to a 30-bed hospital ward being fully occupied all year,” he will say.

He will tell the congress that the (median) average cost of a patient with C. difficile infection was £7,500 (€8,600 approximately) compared to £2,800 (€3,200 approx) for patients with other medical conditions. In Scotland over a one year period, from October 2015 to October 2016, there were 1,150 cases of C. difficile infection in patients aged 15 and over. This cost the National Health Service (NHS) in Scotland a total of £8,650,000. Out of this amount, the additional costs of treating C. difficile infection, over and above the basic cost of a hospital bed and normal medical care, was £1,955,000. The calculations were carried out at Strathclyde University, which is part of the Scottish Healthcare Associated Infection Prevention Institute (SHAIPI) research consortium.

Until now, little has been known about the impact on health service resources from C. difficile infections, and on patients in terms of recurrence of infection, readmission to hospital, length of stay and death rates.

Prof. Leanord and his colleagues in Scotland identified 3,304 patients with C. difficile in Scottish hospitals between 2010 and 2013 and matched them with 9,516 patients who did not have the infection (the control group). Approximately two-thirds of the C. difficile patients acquired the infection in hospital.

They found that patients with C. difficile infection had more than double the risk of dying from any cause within two months of being admitted to hospital; nearly a third of all C. difficile cases (29%) died within two months compared to 14% of patients in the control group. Patients with C. difficile stayed in hospital a (median) average 9.7 days longer than the patients without the infection. Of the 1,712 C. difficile patients who were discharged from hospital within 30 days of the first episode of infection, 59% were readmitted within six months; of the 626 cases discharged more than 30 days after the first episode 53% were readmitted within six months. Few of these re-admissions were directly related to C. difficile infection.

“However, nearly a sixth of patients (14%) who were cured of the initial infection recurred within three months, and nearly one third of them (29%) had a second recurrence within a year,” says Prof. Leanord.

Older people were more vulnerable to a recurrence. Among the patients with C. difficile infection, 22% were aged 85 or over, and patients aged 75 and over had approximately double the risk of a recurrence of the infection compared to those aged under 65. Patients aged between 65-74 had 1.5 times the risk of recurrence compared to younger patients.

Prof. Leanord will conclude: “Having a clear understanding of the nature of C. difficile infections in Scotland will allow the Scottish government to target resources at the most appropriate patients to try to reduce the overall burden of the disease on the health service. Our findings are very likely to be applicable to the rest of the UK and other countries as well.”

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In a second presentation on Saturday, Dr David Enoch, a consultant microbiologist and infection control doctor at the National Infection Service, Public Health England, Cambridge (UK), will report the outcomes of 6,874 patients who had acquired C. difficile infection in hospital between 2002 and 2013 in England. Of these, 1,141 (16.6%) had recurrences of the infection.

“We found that 49% of hospital patients who suffer a recurrent episode of C. difficile infection die within a year, compared to 38% of those who suffer an initial infection only,” he will say. “In addition, 21% of patients with a recurrence suffered other complications as well, such as dehydration, malnourished and sometimes even perforation of the bowel, compared to 18% of patients who did not have a recurrence.”

Dr Enoch estimates that there are approximately 125,000 cases of C. difficile infection in Europe each year, and between 15-30% of these recur. “Cases in the UK have been coming down since 2008, which is most probably due to improvements in antibiotic prescribing and cleaning regimens in hospitals. This is encouraging but more still needs to be done.”

The average age of the patients was 77 and the average length of stay in hospital was 38 days.

“The main risk factor for developing C. difficile infection is prior antibiotic use. These patients are often already ill from some other underlying illness, which explains why they needed antibiotics in the first place. Older people are at greater risk of C. difficile infection as they are often sicker, have other illnesses or conditions, and so need more antibiotics,” he will say.

Dr Enoch continues: “Although much has been done, particularly in the UK, to try to prevent C. difficile infection, strict adherence to antibiotic guidelines by clinicians and thorough cleaning of the hospital environment are crucial in ensuring that patients don’t develop C. difficile infection in the first place. Treatment with a new drug called fidaxomicin has also been shown to reduce the risk of recurrence in patients who are unfortunate enough to develop an infection. However, we still have a lot to learn, particularly about how C. difficile infection occurs in the community, and how best to treat it.”

Treatments for recurrences of C. difficile infection  —–  include stopping the antibiotic that made the patient susceptible to the infection and starting a different antibiotic that is effective against C. difficile infection. These antibiotics include metronidazole, vancomycin and fidaxomicin. Supportive therapy, such as extra fluids, and surgery in serious or life-threatening cases may also be necessary. Faecal transplantation is emerging as a promising option; this is a process in which the good bacteria that the gut needs but which has been killed off by antibiotics is transplanted into the patient from a healthy donor.

(CDF:  Consider contacting an organization conducting Clinical Trials to Treat and Prevent.  Click on the following link for more information :  https://cdifffoundation.org/clinical-trials-2/

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Abstract no: #1672, presented by Prof. Alistair Leanord in the “Clostridium difficile infections: epidemiology and outcome” oral session, 16.30-18.30 hrs, Saturday 22 April, Hall A.

Abstract no: #883, presented by Dr Enoch in the “Clostridium difficile: guts and glory” e-poster mini-oral session, 15.30-16.30 hrs, Saturday 22 April, ePoster Arena 4.

 

To read the article in its entirety – please click on the following link:

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-04/esoc-cdi041917.php

Antibiotic Resistance IS A Serious Global Health Concern

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A Nevada woman has died from an infection resistant to all available antibiotics in the United States, public health officials report.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the woman’s condition was deemed incurable after being tested against 26 different antibiotics.

Though this isn’t the first case of pan-resistant bacteria in the U.S., at this time it is still uncommon. Still, experts note that antibiotic resistance is a growing health concern globally and call the newly reported case “a wake up call.”

“This is the latest reminder that yes, antibiotic resistance is real,” Dr. James Johnson, a professor specializing in infectious diseases at the University of Minnesota Medical School, told CBS News. “This is not some future, fantasized armageddon threat that maybe will happen after our lifetime. This is now, it’s real, and it’s here.”

According to the report, the woman from Washoe County was in her 70s and had recently returned to America after an extended trip to India. She had been hospitalized there several times before being admitted to an acute care hospital in Nevada in mid-August.

Doctors discovered the woman was infected with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), which is a family of germs that CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden has called “nightmare bacteria” due to the danger it poses for spreading antibiotic resistance.

The woman had a specific type of CRE, called Klebsiella pneumoniae, which can lead to a number of illnesses, including pneumonia, blood stream infections, and meningitis. In early September, she developed septic shock and died.

The authors of the report say the case highlights the need for doctors and hospitals to ask incoming patients about recent travel and if they have been hospitalized elsewhere.

Other experts say it underscores the need for the medical community, the government and the public to take antibiotic resistance more seriously.

According to the CDC, at least two million people become infected with antibiotic resistant bacteria each year, and at least 23,000 die as a direct result of these infections.

The World Health Organization calls antibiotic resistance “one of the biggest threats to global health.”

A grim report released last year suggests that if bacteria keep evolving at the current rate, by 2050, superbugs will kill 10 million people a year.

While scientists are working to develop new antibiotics, that takes time, and experts encourage doctors and the public to focus on prevention efforts.

One of the most important ways to prevent antibiotic resistance is to only take antibiotics only when they’re necessary.

“Drug resistance like this [case] generally develops from too much exposure to antibiotics,” assistant professor of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the Pediatric Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, told CBS News. “Every time you’re placed on an antibiotic it’s important to question if it’s absolutely necessary and what’s the shortest amount of time you can take this antibiotic for it to still be effective.”

Johnson notes that medical tourism – the practice of traveling to another country to obtain medical treatment, typically at lower cost – may no longer be worth the risk. “With this [antibiotic] resistance issue, the risk/benefit of this approach really changes and I think that people really need to be aware and seriously consider if it’s a good idea given the possibility of this kind of thing,” he said.

Frequent hand washing, particularly in healthcare settings, is also extremely important in preventing the spread of germs.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the link below to be redirected:

http://www.lasvegasnow.com/news/nevada-woman-died-from-superbug-resistant-to-all-available-antibiotics-in-us/640548775

Medicare Penalties Include Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria In Hospital Patient Injury Reporting

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The federal government has cut payments to 769 hospitals with high rates of patient injuries, for the first time counting the spread of antibiotic-resistant germs in assessing penalties.

The punishments come in the third year of Medicare penalties for hospitals with patients most frequently suffering from potentially avoidable complications, including various types of infections, blood clots, bed sores and falls.

This year – 2016 –  the government also examined the prevalence of two types of bacteria resistant to drugs.

Based on rates of all these complications, the hospitals identified by federal officials this week will lose 1 percent of all Medicare payments for a year — with that time frame beginning this past October. While the government did not release the dollar amount of the penalties, they will exceed a million dollars for many larger hospitals. In total, hospitals will lose about $430 million, 18 percent more than they lost last year, according to an estimate from the Association of American Medical Colleges.

The reductions apply not only to patient stays but also will reduce the amount of money hospitals get to teach medical residents and care for low-income people.

Forty percent of the hospitals penalized this year – 2016 – escaped punishment in the first two years of the program, a Kaiser Health News analysis shows. Those 306 hospitals include the University of Miami Hospital in Florida, Cambridge Health Alliance in Massachusetts, the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor and Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

Nationally, hospital-acquired conditions declined by 21 percent between 2010 and 2015, according to the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, or AHRQ. The biggest reductions were for bad reactions to medicines, catheter infections and post-surgical blood clots.

Still, hospital harm remains a threat. AHRQ estimates there were 3.8 million hospital injuries last year, which translates to 115 injuries during every 1,000 patient hospital stays during that period.

Each year, at least 2 million people become infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics, including nearly a quarter million cases in hospitals. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates 23,000 people die from them.

Infection experts fear that soon patients may face new strains of germs that are resistant to all existing antibiotics. Between 20 and 50 percent of all antibiotics prescribed in hospitals are either not needed or inappropriate, studies have found. Their proliferation — inside the hospital, in doctor’s prescriptions and in farm animals sold for food — have hastened new strains of bacteria that are resistant to many drugs.

One resistant bacteria that Medicare included into its formula for determining financial penalties for hospitals is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, which can cause pneumonia and bloodstream and skin infections. MRSA is prevalent outside of hospitals and sometimes people with it show no signs of disease. But these people can bring the germ into a hospital, where it can be spread by health care providers and be especially dangerous for older or sick patients whose immune system cannot fight the infection.

Hospitals have had some success in reducing MRSA infections, which dropped by 13 percent between 2011 and 2014, according to the CDC. AHRQ estimates there were 6,300 cases in hospitals last year.

The second bacteria measured for the penalties is Clostridium difficile, known as C. diff, It can be spread through contaminated surfaces or hands. ………,

C. diff has challenged infection control efforts. While hospital infections dropped 8 percent from 2008 to 2014, there was a “significant increase” in C. diff that final year, the CDC says. AHRQ estimated there were 100,000 hospital cases last year.

“The reality is we don’t know how to prevent all these infections,” said Dr. Louise Dembry, a professor at the Yale School of Medicine and president of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

The Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program also factors in rates of infections from hysterectomies, colon surgeries, urinary tract catheters and central line tubes. Those infections carry the most weight in determining penalties, but the formula also takes into account the frequency of bed sores, hip fractures, blood clots and four other complications.

Specialized hospitals, such as those that treat psychiatric patients, veterans and children, are exempted from the penalties, as are hospitals with the “critical access” designation for being the only provider in an area. Of the remaining hospitals, the Affordable Care Act requires that Medicare penalize the 25 percent that perform the worst on these measures, even if they have reduced infection rates from previous years.

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To read the article in its entirety click on the following link to be redirected:

http://triblive.com/news/healthnow/11702788-74/hospitals-hospital-penalties

#AntibioticResistance Global Awareness Week — Get Smart About Antibiotics November 14-20th

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#AntibioticResistance

November 14-20th , 2016

In recognition of Get Smart about Antibiotics Week; November 14th – 20th, 2016 — the C Diff Foundation is teaming up with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to participate in a number of social media events and we encourage everyone to participate.

On November 14th the CDC launched a Thunderclap campaign that resonated around the world with a powerful message to kick off the Get Smart About Antibiotics Week.

On November 18th the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control @ECDC_EU  is hosting an ALL-DAY GLOBAL TWITTER CHAT using hashtag #AntibioticResistance

CDC will be hosting part of this live Twitter chat on Friday, November 18th from 11a.m. – 1p.m. EDT @CDCgov and would love your organization to join us in the conversation.

CDC Director, Dr. Tom Frieden @DrFriedenCDC w2ill be Tweeting during the chat, and we hope that you will make plans to take part in this important conversation with antibiotic-resistance partners and experts worldwide.

The Get Smart About Antibiotics Week 2016 observance marks the second annual World Antibiotic Awareness Week, which coincides with European Antibiotic-Awareness Day, Canada Antibiotic Awareness Week, and other similar observances across the world.

There are exceptional opportunities to raise awareness of the threat of antibiotic-resistance and the importance of preserving the power of antibiotics.  With that in mind, please promote your organization’s antibiotic resistance and stewardship materials and resources during the Twitter chat on Friday, November 18th.

Taking Aim at Superbugs and A Review Of the Latest CDC Vital Signs Report With Guest Clifford McDonald, MD Of the CDC

Listen In On Tuesday, March 22nd

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C. diff. Spores and More,” Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program discusses

“Taking aim at “super-bugs” and the latest CDC Vital Signs Report results”

With Our Guest, Dr. Clifford McDonald, MD, — Senior Advisor for Science and Integrity Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the CDC

Tuesday, March 22nd at the following times

10 a.m. Pacific Time
11 a.m. Mountain Time 
12 p.m. Central Time  
1 p.m. Eastern Time

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sounds the alarm on the danger of modern medicine returning to a time when simple infections were often fatal. As the latest Vital Signs Report shows, much progress has been made in our hospitals and healthcare facilities to protect patients from healthcare-associated infections. But, more work needs to be done, because many of these infections are caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria which are difficult, if not impossible to treat. The CDC believes clinicians are key to national progress in preventing infections. They have the power to change the direction of antibiotic resistance each and every time they care for their patients. It requires taking the appropriate steps every time.

We are in a race to slow resistance, and we can’t afford to let the “superbugs” outpace us, especially in healthcare settings.

Cliff-McDonald

Dr. McDonald graduated from Northwestern University Medical School, completed his Internal Medicine Residency at Michigan State University, and an Infectious Diseases Fellowship at the University of South Alabama, following which he completed a fellowship in Medical Microbiology at Duke University. Past positions have included Associate Investigator at the National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan and Assistant Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Louisville. Dr. McDonald is a former officer in the Epidemic Intelligence Service and former Chief of the Prevention and Response Branch in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the CDC where he currently serves as Senior Advisor for Science and Integrity in the same division. He is the author or co-author of over 100 peer-reviewed publications with his main interests in the epidemiology/prevention of HAI’s, especially Clostridium difficile infections, and prevention of antimicrobial resistance.

C. diff. Spores and More™  Global Broadcasting Network –  producing educational programs dedicated to  C. difficile Infections and more —  brought to you by VoiceAmerica and sponsored by Clorox Healthcare

C difficile Study And Antibiotic Resistance; The Risks For Infection

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C. diff Study Provides Insight Into Antibiotic Resistance and Risks for Infection

Exposure to specific antibiotics is linked to the development of certain strains of antibiotic-resistant C. difficile, one of the fastest growing bacteria superbugs, according to a new study published by Stuart Johnson, MD, of Loyola University Health System (LUHS), Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine (SSOM) and the Hines VA Medical Hospital.

“This discovery takes us one step closer to preventing C. diff and supports targeting specific antibiotics for antibiotic stewardship monitoring programs in the setting of high infection rates due to specific strains of C. diff,” said Dr. Johnson, the lead author, who reported the findings of the retrospective C. diff case control study in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

C. diff has been associated with multiple healthcare facility outbreaks and high national rates of C. difficile infection (CDI) since 2001 and now rivals Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in both frequency and severity.

Several infectious diseases, including MRSA and C. diff, have become resistant to antibiotics.

As a result, the medical community has deliberately reduced the routine practice of prescribing antibiotics for infectious diseases.

There currently is not a highly effective prevention method for C. diff.

“Antibiotic exposure is arguably the most important risk factor for C. difficile infection (CDI),” Johnson wrote.

“We know that antibiotics wipe out beneficial flora in the gut, making patients susceptible to a C. diff infection.

The other role of antibiotics highlighted in our study is that overuse of specific antibiotics may facilitate infection due to C. diff strains that are highly resistant to those antibiotics.”

Dr. Johnson and a team that included his longtime research partner, foremost C. diff expert Dale Gerding, MD, LUHS, SSOM, identified 143 patients with first episode CDI between 2005 and 2007 in one U.S. hospital at a time when increased CDI rates and severity were noted nation-wide.

Of those 103 patients, or 72 percent, were infected with the BI/NAP1/027 C. diff strain, which is highly resistant to fluoroquinolones and macrolides.

Most patients received multiple antibiotics within six weeks of being diagnosed with CDI. Fluoroquinolone and macrolide exposure was more frequent in patients with B1 strains, and the C. difficile bacteria recovered from the stool specimens of these BI-infected patients also showed high-level resistance to these antibiotics.

 

The article, “Fluoroquinolone and Macrolide Exposure Predict Clostridium difficile Infection with the Highly Fluoroquinolone-and Macrolide-Resistant Epidemic C. difficile Strain Bi/NAP1/027,” can be read online. Authors are Jeffrey T. Wieczorkiewicz, Bert K. Lopansri, Adam Cheknis, James R. Osmolski, David W. Hecht, Dale N. Gerding and Stuart Johnson.

Source: Loyola University Health System

 

To read article in its entirety click on the link below:

http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/news/2016/02/c-diff-study-provides-insight-into-antibiotic-resistance-and-risks-for-infection.aspx