Tag Archives: Infection

United Nations Releases Critical Warning On Growing Concerns of Drug-Resistant Infections

With more and more common medications losing their ability to fight dangerous infections, and few new drugs in the pipeline, the world is facing an imminent crisis that could lead to millions of deaths, a surge in global poverty and an even wider gap between rich and poor countries, the United Nations warned in a report on April 29th – 2019.

Drug-resistant infections already claim 700,000 lives a year, including 230,000 deaths from drug-resistant tuberculosis, the report said. The rampant overuse of antibiotics and anti-fungal medicines in humans, livestock and agriculture is accelerating a crisis that is poorly understood by the public and largely ignored by world leaders. Without concerted action, a United Nations panel said, resistant infections could kill 10 million people annually by 2050 and trigger an economic slowdown to rival the global financial crisis of 2008.

The problem threatens people around the world. During the next 30 years, the United Nations experts said, 2.4 million people in Europe, North America and Australia could die from drug-resistant infections, making routine hospital procedures like knee-replacement surgery and childbirth far riskier than they are today.

“This is a silent tsunami,” said Dr. Haileyesus Getahun, director of the U.N. Interagency Coordination Group on Antimicrobial Resistance, which spent two years working on the report. “We are not seeing the political momentum we’ve seen in other public health emergencies, but if we don’t act now, antimicrobial resistance will have a disastrous impact within a generation.”

 

To read article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/29/health/un-drug-resistance-antibiotics

Clostridium difficile strain RT244 – Australia researchers

Researchers from Monash University in Australia have found that the RT244 Clostridium difficile strain, which was associated with severe disease and a high mortality rate, has significant pathogenic potential.

While there have been three separate known introductions of RT 027 into Australia in 2008 and two in 2010, the strain has not established here, possibly because of Australia’s conservative policies regarding fluoroquinolones. Nevertheless, there has been a significant increase in the rate of CDI in Australia over the past 3–4 years. Surveillance of hospital-identified (HI) CDI was mandated for public healthcare facilities in Western Australia in January 2010. The quarterly aggregate rate climbed from 1.47 per 10,000 bed days in the first quarter of 2010 to 2.64 per 10,000 bed days in the fourth quarter of 2010 and 4.59 per 10,000 bed days a year later, falling slightly to 4.27 per 10,000 bed days in the fourth quarter of 2012. Rates were approximately 1–3 times higher for tertiary hospitals alone3,4. In a laboratory-based, retrospective review of all cases of CDI identified in four acute care public hospitals in Tasmania between July 2006 and June 2010 inclusive, the annual rate increased from 2.5 per 10,000 patient-care days in 2006–07 to 4.2 per 10,000 patient-care days in 2009–105. The first report from Victoria following the commencement of targeted surveillance for CDI in 2010 was for the period October 2010 to March 2011 inclusive6. They reported a monthly increase in the number of HI-CDI cases, falling only in December 2010, and an overall rate of 2.2 per 10,000 occupied bed days. – See more at: http://microbiology.publish.csiro.au/?paper=MA14008#sthash.RVdbbLhF.dpuf
While there have been three separate known introductions of RT 027 into Australia in 2008 and two in 2010, the strain has not established here, possibly because of Australia’s conservative policies regarding fluoroquinolones. Nevertheless, there has been a significant increase in the rate of CDI in Australia over the past 3–4 years. Surveillance of hospital-identified (HI) CDI was mandated for public healthcare facilities in Western Australia in January 2010. The quarterly aggregate rate climbed from 1.47 per 10,000 bed days in the first quarter of 2010 to 2.64 per 10,000 bed days in the fourth quarter of 2010 and 4.59 per 10,000 bed days a year later, falling slightly to 4.27 per 10,000 bed days in the fourth quarter of 2012. Rates were approximately 1–3 times higher for tertiary hospitals alone3,4. In a laboratory-based, retrospective review of all cases of CDI identified in four acute care public hospitals in Tasmania between July 2006 and June 2010 inclusive, the annual rate increased from 2.5 per 10,000 patient-care days in 2006–07 to 4.2 per 10,000 patient-care days in 2009–105. The first report from Victoria following the commencement of targeted surveillance for CDI in 2010 was for the period October 2010 to March 2011 inclusive6. They reported a monthly increase in the number of HI-CDI cases, falling only in December 2010, and an overall rate of 2.2 per 10,000 occupied bed days. – See more at: http://microbiology.publish.csiro.au/?paper=MA14008#sthash.RVdbbLhF.dpuf

They conducted a retrospective cohort study that included 12 patients with the RT244 strain and 24 matched patients with a non-RT244/non-RT027 strain. They performed whole-genome sequencing on the strains to understand how the RT244 strain was related to other strains. There was no difference in age or comorbidities between the two groups and most patients had antibiotic exposure.

* While there have been three separate known introductions of RT 027 into Australia in 2008 and two in 2010, the strain has not established here, possibly because of Australia’s conservative policies regarding fluoroquinolones. Nevertheless, there has been a significant increase in the rate of CDI in Australia over the past 3–4 years. Surveillance of hospital-identified (HI) CDI was mandated for public healthcare facilities in Western Australia in January 2010. The quarterly aggregate rate climbed from 1.47 per 10,000 bed days in the first quarter of 2010 to 2.64 per 10,000 bed days in the fourth quarter of 2010 and 4.59 per 10,000 bed days a year later, falling slightly to 4.27 per 10,000 bed days in the fourth quarter of 2012. Rates were approximately 1–3 times higher for tertiary hospitals alone3,4. In a laboratory-based, retrospective review of all cases of CDI identified in four acute care public hospitals in Tasmania between July 2006 and June 2010 inclusive, the annual rate increased from 2.5 per 10,000 patient-care days in 2006–07 to 4.2 per 10,000 patient-care days in 2009–105. The first report from Victoria following the commencement of targeted surveillance for CDI in 2010 was for the period October 2010 to March 2011 inclusive6. They reported a monthly increase in the number of HI-CDI cases, falling only in December 2010, and an overall rate of 2.2 per 10,000 occupied bed days.

Another potential explanation for the increase in CDI rates is the emergence of new strains. RT 244 was first identified in Australia in 2011 and preliminary data suggested it was associated with more severe disease. This was recently supported by De Almeida et al.12 who, after identifying a new strain in New Zealand as RT 244, performed a case-control study of cases with CDI due to this RT. Cases had more severe disease (OR 9.33; P = 0.015) and were more likely to have community-associated infections (prevalence ratio 3.33; P = 0.078) when compared with controls who were infected with other C. difficile strains. Like RT 027, RT 244 produces more toxins A and B as a result of a single base pair deletion in tcdC (a gene involved in regulation of toxin A and B production), as well as binary toxin. RT 244 is therefore identified as a putative RT 027 with the Cepheid Xpert® C. difficile/Epi system. Other emerging RTs in Australia include RT 251 (A+B+CDT+), which also appears to be closely related to RT 027, and RT 033 (ABCDT+), RT 126 (A+B+CDT+) and RT 127 (A+B+CDT+), which are closely related to RT 078 (A+B+CDT+), a RT originally only isolated from animals, particularly livestock, in the Northern hemisphere and also associated with more severe disease – See more at: http://microbiology.publish.csiro.au/?paper=MA14008#sthash.RVdbbLhF.dpuf
Another potential explanation for the increase in CDI rates is the emergence of new strains. RT 244 was first identified in Australia in 2011 and preliminary data suggested it was associated with more severe disease. This was recently supported by De Almeida et al.12 who, after identifying a new strain in New Zealand as RT 244, performed a case-control study of cases with CDI due to this RT. Cases had more severe disease (OR 9.33; P = 0.015) and were more likely to have community-associated infections (prevalence ratio 3.33; P = 0.078) when compared with controls who were infected with other C. difficile strains. Like RT 027, RT 244 produces more toxins A and B as a result of a single base pair deletion in tcdC (a gene involved in regulation of toxin A and B production), as well as binary toxin. RT 244 is therefore identified as a putative RT 027 with the Cepheid Xpert® C. difficile/Epi system. Other emerging RTs in Australia include RT 251 (A+B+CDT+), which also appears to be closely related to RT 027, and RT 033 (ABCDT+), RT 126 (A+B+CDT+) and RT 127 (A+B+CDT+), which are closely related to RT 078 (A+B+CDT+), a RT originally only isolated from animals, particularly livestock, in the Northern hemisphere and also associated with more severe disease – See more at: http://microbiology.publish.csiro.au/?paper=MA14008#sthash.RVdbbLhF.dpuf
Another potential explanation for the increase in CDI rates is the emergence of new strains. RT 244 was first identified in Australia in 2011 and preliminary data suggested it was associated with more severe disease. This was recently supported by De Almeida et al.12 who, after identifying a new strain in New Zealand as RT 244, performed a case-control study of cases with CDI due to this RT. Cases had more severe disease (OR 9.33; P = 0.015) and were more likely to have community-associated infections (prevalence ratio 3.33; P = 0.078) when compared with controls who were infected with other C. difficile strains. Like RT 027, RT 244 produces more toxins A and B as a result of a single base pair deletion in tcdC (a gene involved in regulation of toxin A and B production), as well as binary toxin. RT 244 is therefore identified as a putative RT 027 with the Cepheid Xpert® C. difficile/Epi system. Other emerging RTs in Australia include RT 251 (A+B+CDT+), which also appears to be closely related to RT 027, and RT 033 (ABCDT+), RT 126 (A+B+CDT+) and RT 127 (A+B+CDT+), which are closely related to RT 078 (A+B+CDT+), a RT originally only isolated from animals, particularly livestock, in the Northern hemisphere and also associated with more severe disease – See more at: http://microbiology.publish.csiro.au/?paper=MA14008#sthash.RVdbbLhF.dpuf
Another potential explanation for the increase in CDI rates is the emergence of new strains. RT 244 was first identified in Australia in 2011 and preliminary data suggested it was associated with more severe disease. This was recently supported by De Almeida et al.12 who, after identifying a new strain in New Zealand as RT 244, performed a case-control study of cases with CDI due to this RT. Cases had more severe disease (OR 9.33; P = 0.015) and were more likely to have community-associated infections (prevalence ratio 3.33; P = 0.078) when compared with controls who were infected with other C. difficile strains. Like RT 027, RT 244 produces more toxins A and B as a result of a single base pair deletion in tcdC (a gene involved in regulation of toxin A and B production), as well as binary toxin. RT 244 is therefore identified as a putative RT 027 with the Cepheid Xpert® C. difficile/Epi system. Other emerging RTs in Australia include RT 251 (A+B+CDT+), which also appears to be closely related to RT 027, and RT 033 (ABCDT+), RT 126 (A+B+CDT+) and RT 127 (A+B+CDT+), which are closely related to RT 078 (A+B+CDT+), a RT originally only isolated from animals, particularly livestock, in the Northern hemisphere and also associated with more severe disease – See more at: http://microbiology.publish.csiro.au/?paper=MA14008#sthash.RVdbbLhF.dpuf

– See more at: http://microbiology.publish.csiro.au/?paper=MA14008#sthash.RVdbbLhF.dpuf

They found that the patients with the RT244 strain had more severe disease, renal impairment and hypoalbuminemia compared with non-RT244 patients. These patients also were more likely to die: They had a 30-day mortality of 42% and four of the five deaths were attributed to CDI. There were no deaths among patients with non-RT244 strains. Patients with the RT244 strain were 13 times more likely to die compared with those with non-RT244 strains.

In a phylogenomic analysis, the researchers found that the RT244 strain is in the same genetic clade as the strain RT027 (clade 2). In further analyses, the researchers found that the RT244 strain produced a variant toxin B, which may be the contributing factor to the strain’s virulence.

“The overall clinical significance of RT244 cannot be clearly determined at present,” the researchers wrote in Clinical Infectious Diseases. “At our laboratory, C. difficile RT244 has spontaneously declined and the epidemiological data available to us provided no clear evidence for the source of the strain, how it disseminated in our community or why its incidence has declined. Further studies are required to answer these questions, and to better understand the virulence of the strain, and its potential to become endemic and to cause further outbreaks.”

Lim S. Clin Infect Dis. 2014;doi:10.1093/cid/ciu203.

April 2014

To view article in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://www.healio.com/infectious-disease/gastrointestinal-infections/news/online/%7Baded8e63-618e-4300-a1ad-f8402cbfd011%7D/newly-identified-c-difficile-strain-highly-virulent?utm_content=buffer1eab0&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and CDC warns of possible catastrophic consequences

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The CDC has been discussing this matter and publishing information over time in hopes to raise Antibiotic and antibiotic-resistant bacteria awareness in the healthcare industry, and patients/individuals used to depending on Antibiotic therapy for many symptoms that are caused by a virus.

Today the press has released yet one more article with stern headlines regarding “Drug resistant bacteria”  and the possibility of catastrophic consequences combating them.

CDC Director Thomas R. Frieden told reports on Monday that “Without urgent action now, more patients will be thrust back to a time before we had effective drugs.”

The new report has revealed that there are at least two dozen antibiotic resistant bacteria known to harm humans.  Should this path continue some infections will not be able to be treated.

An excerpt from the latest article:

One bacteria atop the agency’s “urgent” list of infections is carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), which typically strike patients in medical facilities and has become resistant to nearly all existing antibiotics. Known as the “nightmare bacteria,” CRE causes life-threatening diarrhea. It has continued to proliferate and has been confirmed in medical facilities in nearly every state.

Clostridium difficile, or C. diff. infections, which cause about 14,000 deaths per year, also made the agency’s urgent list Monday. While resistance to the antibiotics used to treat         C. difficile infections has not yet become a problem, the agency said the bacteria spreads rapidly because it is naturally resistant to many drugs that are used to treat other infections.

Neisseria gonorrhoeae — the drug-resistant form of this bacteria causes gonorrhea, the second most commonly reported infection in the United States. Gonorrhea can cause a variety of illnesses in men and women, including infertility. The CDC estimates there are 820,000 infections each year. In nearly a third of the cases, treatment of the sexually-transmitted disease, is hampered by growing antibiotic resistance.

#1 Prevention remains good hand washing (hand hygiene) before/after eating, before exiting restrooms, before/after diaper changes, before/after patient care, before/after using exam gloves, and as often as necessary.

Speak to your healthcare professional when combating a cold and utilize recommended over-the-counter cold symptom relievers, natural interventions vs antibiotics.  Antibiotics do not combat viruses.   When in doubt, please visit a Physician and healthcare provider, as they will assess and treat symptoms accordingly.

To learn more about this topic, please click on the following link which will redirect you to the article in its entirety.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/drug-resistant-bacteria-pose-potential-catastrophe-cdc-warns/2013/09/16/4cd2d482-1ed6-11e3-b7d1-7153ad47b549_story.html