Category Archives: Antibitoc Resistance

Antimicrobials Working Group (AWG) Announced the Addition of ACURX Pharmaceuticals To Its Coalition Of Companies With the Mission To Combat Drug Resistant Infections

The Antimicrobials Working Group (AWG) announced August 5, 2021 the addition of Acurx Pharmaceuticals, Inc. to its coalition of companies with the mission to combat drug resistant infections and spur life-saving innovations. This new addition brings AWG’s membership to 13 antimicrobial drug companies.

Acurx is a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing a new class of antibiotics for infections caused by bacteria listed as priority pathogens by the World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Their lead product candidate, ibezapolstat, is a first-in-class of a new class of DNA pol IIIC inhibitors which is in Phase 2 clinical development to treat C. difficile Infection (CDI). Ibezapolstat is the first antibiotic candidate intended to work by blocking the DNA Pol IIIC enzyme, the enzyme necessary for replication of the DNA of the C. difficile bacterial cell.

“We are delighted to have Acurx join AWG and add their voice to our mission to improve the antimicrobial drug and device environment to provide doctors and patients with innovative treatment options for difficult to treat infectious diseases,” said Ted Schroeder, Chief Executive Officer of Nabriva Therapeutics and Chairman of AWG. “Through the collective power of our membership, AWG will continue to engage with key legislators and stakeholders to drive public policy that will stabilize the fragile antimicrobial ecosystem, enable appropriate patient access to novel products, and spur much-needed research and development to help combat the growing threat of antimicrobial resistance. We look forward to working with Acurx to accomplish these goals.”

Bob DeLuccia, Executive Chairman of Acurx, stated: “Antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive infections are substantial societal, public health, and economic burdens worldwide. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) alone accounts for more than half of the infections in US-hospitalized patients, more than any other category of pathogens, including the most problematic serious Gram-negative infections combined. He further stated: “Acurx is pleased to join the AWG and support its efforts to improve the regulatory, investment and commercial environment for successful antimicrobial drug development and commercialization, thereby ensuring preparedness for the next pandemic, antimicrobial resistance, for the benefit of patients worldwide.”

All pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies developing new antimicrobial therapeutics and diagnostic devices are eligible for consideration of membership in AWG. If you are interested in learning more about becoming a member of AWG, please contact us here.

About Acurx Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Acurx Pharmaceuticals is a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing new antibiotics for difficult to treat infections. The Company’s approach is to develop antibiotic candidates that target the DNA polymerase IIIC enzyme. Its R&D pipeline includes antibiotic product candidates that target Gram-positive bacteria, including Clostridioides difficile, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) and drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP).

For more information, please visit: www.acurxpharma.com.

About The Antimicrobials Working Group

AWG was founded in 2012 with the vision of utilizing collective power to improve the regulatory, investment, and commercial environment for emerging infectious disease companies. Today, AWG is comprised of thirteen antimicrobials companies: Acurx Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: ACXP), Cidara Therapeutics Inc. (NASDAQ: CDTX), , Crestone, Inc., Entasis Therapeutics Inc., Iterum Therapeutics Ltd. (NASDAQ: ITRM), Melinta Therapeutics Inc. (NASDAQ: MLNT), Nabriva Therapeutics US Inc. (NASDAQ: NBRV), Paratek Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: PRTK), Qpex Biopharma, Inc., SCYNEXIS Inc. (NASDAQ: SCYX), Summit Therapeutics plc (NASDAQ: SMMT) (AIM: SUMM), UTILITY therapeutics Ltd., and Venatorx Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

For more information, visit: www.antimicrobialsworkinggroup.org

About The Conafay Group

The Conafay Group, led by Stephen R. Conafay, Principal, is a life-sciences government relations firm based in Washington D.C. that serves as Washington counsel and coalition manager for AWG.

For more information, visit: www.conafaygroup.com

 

C. diff. Spores and More Live Broadcast Enters Season VI

Welcome to Season VI on 

C. diff. Spores and More

Live Broadcast, sponsored

by Clorox Healthcare.

 

With over 260 archived episodes ~ Listen At Your Leisure


It’s a new year with an entirely new line up of guests eager to share their C. difficile research, infection prevention methods, clinical trials in progress, the updates in the C. diff. community, and much more.

 

 

 

 

In March the post-Patient and Family Symposium presentations will broadcast, in the event you weren’t able to attend the live-online event hosted on January 15th. The first annual Patient and Family Symposium was sponsored by Seres Therapeutics

Do you have a specific topic of interest or would like to learn more about a specific product or procedure?  Send an email to info@cdifffoundation.org and share your suggestions and interests.

“None of us can do this alone ~ All of us can do this together.”

Join us every Tuesday at 1:00 p.m. EST for the Live Broadcast  www.cdiffradio.com

 

U.S. Antibiotic Awareness Week Annual Observance Is November 18-24, 2020

 

 

 

 

U.S. Antibiotic Awareness Week (USAAW) is an annual observance that highlights the steps everyone can take to improve antibiotic prescribing and use. U.S. Antibiotic Awareness Week is November 18-24, 2020. Antibiotics can save lives and are critical tools for treating a number of common and more serious infections, like those that can lead to sepsis.

Antibiotics can save lives and are critical tools for treating a number of common and more serious infections, like those that can lead to sepsis. At least 28% of antibiotics prescribed in U.S. outpatient settings are unnecessary and each year, enough prescriptions are written in outpatient settings to give five out of every six people one antibiotic prescription.

Any time antibiotics are used, they can cause side effects and contribute to the development of antibiotic resistance, one of the most urgent threats to the public’s health.

Antibiotic resistance happens when germs, like bacteria and fungi, develop the ability to defeat the drugs designed to kill them. Each year in the United States, more than 2.8 million infections from bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics occur and more than 35,000 people die as a direct result. Many more die from complications from antibiotic-resistant infections.

Improving the way healthcare professionals prescribe antibiotics, and the way we take antibiotics, helps keep us healthy now, helps fight antibiotic resistance, and ensures that these life-saving drugs will be available for future generations.

USAAW is a collaboration of CDC, state-based programs, nonprofit partners, and for-profit partners. You can join official USAAW events or host your own. There are many ways to get involved!

 

How To Participate

  • Share social media messages, images, and animated graphics on your organization’s social media channels. Remember to use #USAAW20 and #BeAntibioticsAware in every post
  • Include information about Be Antibiotics Aware and U.S. Antibiotic Awareness Week in your organization’s print and e-newsletters.
  • Print and share handouts and posters with patients and healthcare professionals. Select items are now available in Spanish, French, Portuguese, Vietnamese, Chinese and Korean.
  • Play videos (available in English and Spanish) on iPads and TV screens in your medical office, pharmacy, waiting room, or lobby.

CDC encourages patients and families to:

  • Get the facts about antibiotics. Antibiotics do not work on viruses, such as those that cause colds, flu, bronchitis, or runny noses, even if the mucus is thick, yellow, or green. When antibiotics aren’t needed, they won’t help you, and the side effects could still cause harm.
  • Ask your healthcare professional about the most appropriate treatment for you or your loved ones’ illness. If antibiotics are not needed, ask about the best way to feel better while your body fights off the virus.
  • If you need antibiotics, take them exactly as prescribed. Talk with your healthcare professional if you have any questions about your antibiotics.
  • Talk with your healthcare professional if you develop any side effects, especially severe diarrhea, since that could be a Clostridioides difficile (C. difficile or C. diff) infection, which needs to be treated immediately.
  • Do your best to stay healthy and keep others healthy by cleaning hands by washing with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol; covering your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze; staying home when sick; and getting recommended vaccines, such as the flu vaccine.

CDC encourages patients and families to use the educational resources and learn more about Be Antibiotics Aware by visiting: https://www.cdc.gov/antibiotic-use/?s_cid=NCEZID-AntibioticUse-023.

Infection Prevention Awareness Worldwide

 

 

 

In early 2020, a simple online hand-washing demonstration went viral. The video, created by a restaurateur in India and imitated by health-care professionals and breakfast-television hosts around the world, showed a pair of hands in clean disposable gloves receiving a glob of children’s paint in one palm. The hands then went through all the motions of correct hand washing and, in the end, the gloves were fully coated with paint.

This message, and others like it, have helped to make 2020 a golden year for infection-prevention awareness. During the COVID-19 pandemic, public-health officials have reached the masses with their messages about how to avoid infection. Now, having seen how various nations have dutifully scrubbed, sanitized and distanced their way to try to bring down the number of coronavirus cases, researchers and public-health specialists are keen to keep the momentum going for another reason: to stall the spread of infections that are becoming resistant to antimicrobial drugs.

Prevention first

Antimicrobial resistance is a threat to human life that exceeds that posed by COVID-19 by orders of magnitude. Unless practices change, by 2050, an estimated 10 million people will be dying every year as a result of resistant bacteria1. Antibiotics are common treatments for illnesses — whether or not they are caused by bacteria. A 2016 analysis showed that only about 70% of antibiotic prescriptions in US hospitals were appropriate2. And a systematic review of reports published between 1970 and 2009 on non-prescription use of antimicrobials showed that the drugs were frequently used to treat non-bacterial diseases3. Unsurprisingly, it also found that resistant bacteria were common in communities with high levels of non-prescription use. The resistant bacteria then spread from person to person through surfaces such as mobile phones.

 

Preventing infection is an important facet of nearly all programmes designed to promote effective use of antibiotics, an area known as antimicrobial stewardship. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), global efforts to preserve the effectiveness of antibiotics must include strategies for preventing any infection that might be treated with the drugs, whether justifiably or not. Teena Chopra, an infectious-disease specialist at the Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit, Michigan, is fully behind this approach. Because infections are difficult to diagnose and treat quickly, Chopra says that the biggest impact will come from preventing infections in the community, not just in hospitals.

Pandemic lessons

Christina Vandenbroucke-Grauls, a medical microbiologist at VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, chairs a group that monitors hospital outbreaks of resistant bacteria in the Netherlands. Over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic, such infections have almost disappeared in the country, she says. “Apparently, people are a lot more careful.” The sharp reduction could be because hospital staff are more diligent about hand washing — and many suspect that this is also the case elsewhere.

Infection-control messages have been effective outside hospital settings, too. Many countries have seen a fall in the number of non-COVID-19 infections, such as seasonal influenza. In Australia, for instance, fewer people have died from flu this year compared with 2019. And Sweden declared the end of its flu season almost two months earlier than usual, despite its controversial light-touch approach to managing the spread of COVID-19.

Chopra is keen to keep this hygiene momentum going and points out that the pandemic has revealed considerable weak spots. “This COVID-19 pandemic exposed a lot of vulnerabilities in our core health infrastructure,” she says. “We dealt with a lack of infection control in alternative health-care settings, like nursing homes, schools, daycare centres, dialysis centres, nursing facilities and rehab facilities.” She thinks that those who run these services need to have a more prominent role in antimicrobial stewardship.

To help manage COVID-19, Chopra recruited medical students to assist with prevention efforts in residential care facilities in Detroit. They coordinated the regular testing of residents for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and showed the staff how to group infected individuals together to contain any outbreaks. Community-level interventions have also been crucial in other parts of the world for slowing the spread of COVID-19.

Better behaviours

Without such measures, people will continue to transfer microbes to each other. The risk of transmission can be limited by using microbe-destroying surfaces such as copper, and through rigorous disinfection with chemicals and exposure to ultraviolet light. However, such measures can be difficult to implement in communities. The only two universally effective methods are hand hygiene and staying away from others, Chopra says. “Hand hygiene is the cornerstone — not only in the hospital but everywhere.”

These strategies might seem simple, but they require people to change their behaviour, and that is easier said than done. Garth Graham at the University of Connecticut in Hartford, who developed the first US national plan to reduce health disparities, says: “Understanding of risk is the first step to getting people to adopt behaviours that help prevent infections.” In 2003, for example, people changed their behaviour by washing their hands more frequently and cleaning surfaces to prevent the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus once they understood the risk. Conversely, a lack of awareness of the effect of infections such as measles and polio has contributed to a growing hesitancy by some to vaccinate.

But after people understand the risk, says Graham, they then need information on how to change their behaviour effectively. And, he says, the campaigns that provide this information need to come from a trusted source and be tailored to the target group. “Some people trust government entities. Some trust their local physician. Some people trust their church,” he says.

In 2009, for example, a public-health team designed a hand-washing campaign called Hands up for Max! The team distributed posters to primary schools in the United Kingdom demonstrating the correct way to wash hands and distributed stickers to pupils. By contrast, a campaign run by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) targeted parents using downloadable posters and social media posts with the hashtag #KeepHandsClean to drive home the message that family hand washing is an easy and effective way to prevent illness. “Public-health messaging starts with years of understanding the local infrastructure and the local community. Local organizations that have built trust for a long time with the target group are the most effective messengers.”

Chopra thinks that communities will now make permanent changes to keep infections at bay. “How we function, how we talk to each other, how we greet each other — all of that is going to change,” she says. Indeed, Anthony Fauci, director of the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda, Maryland, has already declared the end of the handshake.

A broader view

Fervent measures aimed at preventing infection can come with downsides, however. Corinne Hohl, an emergency-medicine physician at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, who leads the Canadian COVID-19 Emergency Department Rapid Response Network, points out that deaths unrelated to COVID-19 have increased during the pandemic in Canada and some other countries. Although the exact reason is not certain, physicians suggest that people might be choosing not to access emergency services because of fears that they might contract the coronavirus by leaving their homes.

In many parts of the world, behavioural change is unlikely to make a significant difference by itself. In some low-income countries, managing infection rates will require considerable investment in infrastructure. The WHO says that 1.1 billion people worldwide lack access to proper latrines, increasing the risk of bacterial infections that cause diarrhoea. Antibiotics can be seen as a quick fix to deal with deficits in basic infrastructure. India, which has one of the world’s highest rates of antimicrobial resistance, launched a country-wide initiative in 2014, with the goals of building toilets and stopping groups from manually collecting faeces for disposal.

Preventing infection is not an insignificant challenge, but perhaps now more than ever, the world is ready to talk about doing so. “I think infection control will generate, for a few years at least, much more interest,” says Vandenbroucke-Grauls. The coronavirus has brought an opportunity to raise awareness about the importance of infectious diseases as a cause of death. In the era of vaccines and broadly effective antibiotic medicines, Vandenbroucke-Grauls says, “this might be a kind of wake-up call for people — they shouldn’t think infectious diseases are a thing of the past”.

 

To view the article in its entirety, please click on the link below to be redirected. Thank you.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-02885-2

 

United Nations Releases Critical Warning On Growing Concerns of Drug-Resistant Infections

With more and more common medications losing their ability to fight dangerous infections, and few new drugs in the pipeline, the world is facing an imminent crisis that could lead to millions of deaths, a surge in global poverty and an even wider gap between rich and poor countries, the United Nations warned in a report on April 29th – 2019.

Drug-resistant infections already claim 700,000 lives a year, including 230,000 deaths from drug-resistant tuberculosis, the report said. The rampant overuse of antibiotics and anti-fungal medicines in humans, livestock and agriculture is accelerating a crisis that is poorly understood by the public and largely ignored by world leaders. Without concerted action, a United Nations panel said, resistant infections could kill 10 million people annually by 2050 and trigger an economic slowdown to rival the global financial crisis of 2008.

The problem threatens people around the world. During the next 30 years, the United Nations experts said, 2.4 million people in Europe, North America and Australia could die from drug-resistant infections, making routine hospital procedures like knee-replacement surgery and childbirth far riskier than they are today.

“This is a silent tsunami,” said Dr. Haileyesus Getahun, director of the U.N. Interagency Coordination Group on Antimicrobial Resistance, which spent two years working on the report. “We are not seeing the political momentum we’ve seen in other public health emergencies, but if we don’t act now, antimicrobial resistance will have a disastrous impact within a generation.”

 

To read article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/29/health/un-drug-resistance-antibiotics