Category Archives: Antibiotic resistance

Antimicrobials Working Group (AWG) Announced the Addition of ACURX Pharmaceuticals To Its Coalition Of Companies With the Mission To Combat Drug Resistant Infections

The Antimicrobials Working Group (AWG) announced August 5, 2021 the addition of Acurx Pharmaceuticals, Inc. to its coalition of companies with the mission to combat drug resistant infections and spur life-saving innovations. This new addition brings AWG’s membership to 13 antimicrobial drug companies.

Acurx is a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing a new class of antibiotics for infections caused by bacteria listed as priority pathogens by the World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Their lead product candidate, ibezapolstat, is a first-in-class of a new class of DNA pol IIIC inhibitors which is in Phase 2 clinical development to treat C. difficile Infection (CDI). Ibezapolstat is the first antibiotic candidate intended to work by blocking the DNA Pol IIIC enzyme, the enzyme necessary for replication of the DNA of the C. difficile bacterial cell.

“We are delighted to have Acurx join AWG and add their voice to our mission to improve the antimicrobial drug and device environment to provide doctors and patients with innovative treatment options for difficult to treat infectious diseases,” said Ted Schroeder, Chief Executive Officer of Nabriva Therapeutics and Chairman of AWG. “Through the collective power of our membership, AWG will continue to engage with key legislators and stakeholders to drive public policy that will stabilize the fragile antimicrobial ecosystem, enable appropriate patient access to novel products, and spur much-needed research and development to help combat the growing threat of antimicrobial resistance. We look forward to working with Acurx to accomplish these goals.”

Bob DeLuccia, Executive Chairman of Acurx, stated: “Antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive infections are substantial societal, public health, and economic burdens worldwide. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) alone accounts for more than half of the infections in US-hospitalized patients, more than any other category of pathogens, including the most problematic serious Gram-negative infections combined. He further stated: “Acurx is pleased to join the AWG and support its efforts to improve the regulatory, investment and commercial environment for successful antimicrobial drug development and commercialization, thereby ensuring preparedness for the next pandemic, antimicrobial resistance, for the benefit of patients worldwide.”

All pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies developing new antimicrobial therapeutics and diagnostic devices are eligible for consideration of membership in AWG. If you are interested in learning more about becoming a member of AWG, please contact us here.

About Acurx Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Acurx Pharmaceuticals is a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing new antibiotics for difficult to treat infections. The Company’s approach is to develop antibiotic candidates that target the DNA polymerase IIIC enzyme. Its R&D pipeline includes antibiotic product candidates that target Gram-positive bacteria, including Clostridioides difficile, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) and drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP).

For more information, please visit: www.acurxpharma.com.

About The Antimicrobials Working Group

AWG was founded in 2012 with the vision of utilizing collective power to improve the regulatory, investment, and commercial environment for emerging infectious disease companies. Today, AWG is comprised of thirteen antimicrobials companies: Acurx Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: ACXP), Cidara Therapeutics Inc. (NASDAQ: CDTX), , Crestone, Inc., Entasis Therapeutics Inc., Iterum Therapeutics Ltd. (NASDAQ: ITRM), Melinta Therapeutics Inc. (NASDAQ: MLNT), Nabriva Therapeutics US Inc. (NASDAQ: NBRV), Paratek Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: PRTK), Qpex Biopharma, Inc., SCYNEXIS Inc. (NASDAQ: SCYX), Summit Therapeutics plc (NASDAQ: SMMT) (AIM: SUMM), UTILITY therapeutics Ltd., and Venatorx Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

For more information, visit: www.antimicrobialsworkinggroup.org

About The Conafay Group

The Conafay Group, led by Stephen R. Conafay, Principal, is a life-sciences government relations firm based in Washington D.C. that serves as Washington counsel and coalition manager for AWG.

For more information, visit: www.conafaygroup.com

 

Patient, Family, Caregiver January Symposium Broadcasts During March On C. diff. Spores and More Live Program

CDIFFRADIO.COM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAVE THE DATES to listen in to the leading topic expert presentations

shared on January 15, 2021, at the Patient, Family, Caregiver Symposium:

Beginning Tuesday, March 9 from 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. EST following through on

March 16,  March 23, and  March 30.

A Symposium specifically developed for Patients Diagnosed With a C. diff. Infection, Being Treated For a Clostridioides diffiicile infection, Recovering From a Clostridioides difficile Infection and Recurrences with Family Members and Caregivers.

The Patient & Family C. diff. Symposium was a gathering of healthcare professionals, keynote speakers, health advocates, practitioners, educators, thought leaders, and patients who are transforming the patient experience and changing the way people experience
C. diff. infections worldwide.

Unlike other conferences on this topic, patients will share their C. diff. infection journeys, providing a real-world perspective on patient experience. Our attendees will learn more from this virtual-online symposium and gain knowledge on important topics that will better aid their care and recovery through tools and strategies delivered by keynote speakers.  

The Symposium followed the C Diff Foundation Mission statement –   Educating and Advocating for the prevention, treatments, clinical trials, diagnostics, and environmental safety of Clostridioides difficile
(C. diff.) infections worldwide.

Keynote speakers presented up-to-date data to expand on the existing knowledge and provide important information focused on, yet not limited to,  a Clostridioides difficile infection (also known as C. diff., C. difficile, CDAD, CDI) ……

  • Prevention
  • Treatments
  • Diagnostics
  • Research
  • Environmental Safety
  • Clinical trials and studies

WITH

  • Introduction to Microbiome Research and Studies
  • Infection Prevention
  • Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants
  • Antibiotic Stewardship

We hope you enjoy the broadcasts!

 

Program Chair:  Paul Feuerstadt, MD, FACG

Barbara McGovern, MD     “Treatment of recurrent C. difficile infection with                                                                                        SER-109, an investigational microbiome drug.”

Paul Feuerstadt, MD          ” C. diff. Overview – What is a C. diff. Infection?”

Sahil Khanna, MD               “C. diff. Treatments + FMT Overview. “

 

 

 

Simon Cutting, Ph. D.         “Bacillus, and C. diff.  Spore Overview. “

Teena Chopra, MD                ” Introduction to Infection Prevention.”

Doe Kley, RN, MPH              “C. diff. Transitioning from Hospital to Home. “

Courtney Jones                    ” Microbiome, Microbiota, and Gut Health.”

Denise Cardo, MD                “Everyone Has a Role in Antibiotic Awareness.”

Larry Kociolek, MD              “C. diff. Infections in Pediatrics.”

Kathy Bischoff                        “My C. diff.  Journey.”

Renata Johnson                      “My C. diff. Journey.”

Paul Feuerstadt, MD      &    Barbara McGovern, MD

 

This Symposium was hosted by the C Diff Foundation and

Sponsored by Seres Therapeutics  

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Publish the 2018 National & State Healthcare Associated Infection Progress Report

The CDC published the 2018 National and State Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI) Progress Report showing significant progress nationally  in reducing several hospital-acquired infections and highlighting that prevention of these infections is possible. CDC’s HAI Progress Report is a snapshot of how each state and the country are doing in eliminating the infections outlined in the HAI National Action Plan.

 

Using data from CDC’s National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), the 2018 HAI Progress Report shows the following reductions have been achieved nationally among acute care hospitals (2017 – 2018):

  • About 9% decrease in central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs)
  • About 8% decrease in catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs)
  • No significant changes in ventilator-associated events (VAEs)
  • No significant changes in surgical site infections (SSIs) related to the 10 procedures tracked in the report
  • No significant changes in hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream infections
  • About 12% decrease in hospital-onset C. difficile infections

 Each day, approximately one in 31 U.S. patients have at least one infection in association with his or her hospital care, underscoring the need for improvements in patient care practices in U.S. healthcare facilities. While much progress has been made, more needs to be done to prevent healthcare-associated infections in a variety of settings. Ongoing collaboration between public health, healthcare professionals, and other partners is critical to ensuring patient safety.

 Additionally, the HAI Progress Report data are now available in CDC’s new Antibiotic Resistance & Patient Safety Portal (AR&PSP), an interactive web-based application that was created to innovatively display data collected through CDC’s NHSN and other sources.  We hope you’ll use the AR&PSP to view enhanced data visualizations on Antibiotic Resistance, Use, and Stewardship datasets as well as HAI data for the nation and states.

Researchers Uncover How Bacteria is Able to Shut Its Doors to Antibiotics

Drug-resistant infections have been a growing concern across the medical and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States alone, approximately 23,000 people die each year from infections that are resistant to antibiotics. Now, researchers may know why this happens.
New findings from researchers at Imperial College London show that these bacterial infections are able to reject antibiotics by “closing tiny doors in their cell walls.”

By understanding how these cells are able to shut the doors, the researchers said this could provide new understandings for drugmakers to develop treatments that will “pick the locks” of the closed doors. The result of the research was published today in Nature Communications In the study, the Imperial College researchers, who are focused on antibiotic resistance, looked at the bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae, which causes infections in the lungs, blood and wounds of people in hospitals. Patients that have compromised immune systems are especially vulnerable to this bacterium. The researchers said K. pneumoniae is becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics, particularly a family of drugs called Carbapenems, which are used in hospitals when others have failed or are ineffective. Because of this resistance to the powerful antibiotics, the World Health Organization listed Carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae as a critical problem.


The researchers found that K. pneumoniae is able to resist Carbapenems by shutting down it surface pores, which is how the antibiotics typically attack the bacteria. The team compared the structures of K. pneumoniae bacteria that were resistant to Carbapenems to those that weren’t and found the resistant bacteria had modified or absent versions of a protein that creates pores in the cell wall. Resistant bacteria have much smaller pores, blocking the drug from entering, the researchers said in a statement.   Joshua Wong, from the Department of Life Sciences at Imperial and first author of the study, said with the growing threat of antibiotic-resistant bugs like K. pneumoniae, it’s important to understand how it happened in order to provide “vital insights that could allow new strategies and drugs to be designed.”

There is some good news though from this finding. The researchers said that the bacteria grow at a much slower rate when its doors are closed due to its inability to absorb nutrients while being attacked by the antibiotics.

Those closed doors will present a challenge to drug developers. Gad Frankel, head of the study team, said the ability of the bacteria to shut its doors to the antibiotics will also provide a mechanism to counteract many other drugs. He said that ability will be difficult to get around.
“However, we hope that it will be possible to design drugs that can pick the lock of the door, and our data provide information to help scientists and pharmaceutical companies make these new agents a reality,” Frankel said in a statement.

Over the past few years, there have been multiple stories about the rise of drug-resistant pathogens. Recently, a dangerous fungal infection known as  Candida auris reared its head in a New York hospital. The facility had to tear out part of the room a patient was housed in due to the spread of the fungal infection, which can be fatal. With growing concerns about the rise of drug-resistant bacteria, multiple companies are developing new forms of antimicrobials to take on serious health concerns, such as carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae, Clostridium difficile, better known as C. diff, or Staphylococcus infections

to review article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.biospace.com/article/researchers-discover-why-some-bacteria-has-become-resistant-to-antibiotics

May Is National Walking Month and Time For the Annual Global C.diff. (CDI) Awareness 2K Walk

With its fresh Spring mornings and lovely long evenings – not to mention an extra long weekend – it’s no wonder that May is the official National Walking Month. Whether you prefer leisurely strolls or challenging hikes, our four park surroundings have a  walk for everyone to raise awareness of C.diff., walk for a cause in all locations.   Lace up your walking shoes and venture out to Milton A. Votee Park, Teaneck, N.J., Charlestown Township Park, Phoenixville, PA., Sims Park, New Port Richey, FL.,  on Saturday, May 18th to experience one of  these 3 C.diff. Awareness 2k walks.

 

Registration is open until May 8th.   3rd Annual Global C.diff. Awareness 2K Walks.

The USA events will take place on Saturday, May 18, 2019 from 8 a.m. – 12 p.m.

 

Dr. Martha Cloakie, PhD will be leading the walk in Leicester, U.K. on Friday, May 17, 2019.

All registered awareness walkers will receive t-shirts, giveaways, and educational material while introducing the communities to the resources available. C.diff. infections are one of the leading healthcare-associated infections facing local communities.

Registration is $20.00 per walker and children 10 years of age and under walk free. https://cdifffoundation.org/3rdannualwalk/

Proceeds from the events will benefit the C Diff Foundation’s mission educating and advocating for C.difficile infection prevention, treatments, clinical trials,  environmental safety, sepsis, and antibiotic awareness worldwide.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a Clostridioides difficile infection (C.difficile), (formally known as Clostridium difficile) “has become the most common microbial cause of healthcare-associated infections in U.S. hospitals and costs up to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs for acute care facilities alone.”

Statistics provided by the CDC suggest that C. difficile cause nearly 500,000 infections in patients in the U.S. annually. In one study noted by the CDC, among infected patients, nearly 29,000 died within 30 days of being diagnosed, and more than half of those deaths (15,000) were directly attributable to a C. difficile infection.

We sincerely thank Vedanta Biosciences, Inc. for being the Diamond Sponsor of the 3rd Annual Global C.diff. Awareness 2K Walks. Vedanta Biosciences, Inc. is dedicated to finding treatments for patients with serious infections and immune diseases. Vedanta develops medicines made of consortia of bacterial strains which are selected to effect robust and durable changes in a patient’s gut microbiota. In contrast to fecal transplants or administration of fecal fractions, Vedanta’s medicines are pure, uniform compositions of bacteria manufactured from clonal cell banks, bypassing the need to rely on direct sourcing of fecal donor material of inconsistent composition. Vedanta is currently enrolling patients with recurrent C. difficile infections (CDI) in its CONSORTIUM study to evaluate VE303, an investigational treatment for CDI.

Our gratitude to all of the sponsors for their support and partnering with the C Diff Foundation in raising C. diff. awareness worldwide:

Gold Sponsors:    Rebiotix, Pfizer, Ferring Pharmaceutical

Silver Sponsor:    CutisPharma

Bronze Sponsor: Finch Therapeutics

If you have any questions,  please contact one of our staff members at

(727) – 205 – 3922  or e-mail:  info@cdifffoundation.org

We look forward to walking with you on May 18th!

Follow Us On Twitter:   #CdiffWalks2019