Tag Archives: c difficile

C Diff Foundation Members Are Here For YOU Especially During the Pandemic

To Our Dear Patients, Families, and Healthcare Professionals,

To say these times have been trying is a giant understatement. We hope that you and your families are staying safe during this period of self quarantine, social distancing and limiting your daily exposures to help flatten the curve of COVID-19.

If anything is to come of this, we hope that it will be the value of hand washing, which will in turn help to prevent the spread of Healthcare-associated infections (HAI’s).

COVID-19 is in the forefront and this pandemic has majorly changed our lives. We are living through this together while healthcare professionals, across the globe, are dedicated  in developing the best possible practices for infection prevention, treatments and safety in public health.  For up-to-date COVID-19 information, please visit the CDC website:  www.cdc.gov

Be rest assured that the C Diff Foundation members continue to work diligently to educate and advocate for C. diff.  Infection prevention,  treatments, clinical trials, diagnostics, environmental safety and support to help those diagnosed with, being treated for, and recovering from a
C. diff. Infection worldwide.

Should you find yourself needing assistance with C. diff. infection information and support, please do not hesitate to contact us. We are here for you, your families, friends and healthcare professionals to see you through, and beyond a C. diff. infection.

A huge thank you goes out from all of us here at the C Diff Foundation to the brave men and women on the front lines of this pandemic. Without you and your bravery,  we would be in a major state of disarray. Thank you for being a guiding light for us all worldwide.

Check in on your neighbors, friends and families to make sure that they are okay. Keep your spirits high and know that we will get through this together.

“None of us can do this alone ~ All of us can do this together.”

C Diff Foundation Members Are Here For YOU Even During the Pandemic

To Our Dear Patients, Families, and Healthcare Professionals,

To say these times have been trying is a giant understatement. We hope that you and your families are staying safe during this period of self quarantine, social distancing and limiting your daily exposures to help flatten the curve of COVID-19.

If anything is to come of this, we hope that it will be the value of hand washing, which will in turn help to prevent the spread of Healthcare-associated infections (HAI’s).

COVID-19 is in the forefront and this pandemic has majorly changed our lives. We are living through this together while healthcare professionals, across the globe, are dedicated  in developing the best possible practices for infection prevention, treatments and safety in public health.  For up-to-date COVID-19 information, please visit the CDC website:  www.cdc.gov

Be rest assured that the C Diff Foundation members continue to work diligently to educate and advocate for C. diff.  Infection prevention,  treatments, clinical trials, diagnostics, environmental safety and support to help those diagnosed with, being treated for, and recovering from a
C. diff. Infection worldwide.

Should you find yourself needing assistance with C. diff. infection information and support, please do not hesitate to contact us. We are here for you, your families, friends and healthcare professionals to see you through, and beyond a C. diff. infection.

A huge thank you goes out from all of us here at the C Diff Foundation to the brave men and women on the front lines of this pandemic. Without you and your bravery,  we would be in a major state of disarray. Thank you for being a guiding light for us all worldwide.

Check in on your neighbors, friends and families to make sure that they are okay. Keep your spirits high and know that we will get through this together.

“None of us can do this alone ~ All of us can do this together.”

US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Issued a Safety Alert About Potential Risks of Serious, Even Life-Threatening Infections Linked To Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT)

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) yesterday issued a safety alert about the potential risk of serious, even life-threatening, infections linked to fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) after six patients were infected with diarrhea-causing Escherichia coli following the procedure.  March 13, 2020

According to the alert, two patients developed enteropathogenic E coli (EPEC) infections, and four developed Shiga toxin–producing E coli (STEC), after receiving FMT for Clostridoides difficile infection. Four of the six patients required hospitalization.

“FDA is informing patients and healthcare providers of the potential risk of transmission of pathogenic bacteria by FMT products and the resultant serious adverse reactions that may occur,” the agency said. “Patients considering FMT for the treatment of C. difficile infection should speak to their health care provider to understand the associated risks.”

STEC is a pathogenic form of E coli that causes abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea, vomiting, and mild fever. EPEC generally doesn’t cause any symptoms, but some strains can cause diarrhea.

Change in screening protocols

The stool used in the procedures all came from Boston-based OpenBiome, the country’s largest stool bank. The company said in a press release yesterday that the cases are the first reports of likely transmission of pathogens by FMT involving stool that came from OpenBiome, which has shipped more than 50,000 FMT treatments to physicians since 2013.

The patients who developed the infections received FMT product prepared from three OpenBiome donors. The two patients who developed EPEC infections were treated with stool from two donors, and the six STEC patients received stool from one donor. OpenBiome says all unused material from the donors has been destroyed.

The FDA says bacterial isolates from the patients’ stools are not yet available to determine if the STEC or EPEC organisms are genetically identical to the organisms from the stool donors—a finding that would confirm that the donor stool was the source of the infection.

In response to the safety alert, OpenBiome says it is immediately implementing changes to its screening program in collaboration with the FDA.

While the company has previously screened donor samples for STEC via enzyme immunoassay, and says the donor involved in the STEC cases tested negative at all screens, OpenBiome will add polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for STEC to its screening process. PCR tests on retained donor samples conducted after Openbiome was notified of the infections were found to be positive for STEC.

The retained stool samples from the donors linked to the EPEC infections were found to be positive for EPEC upon further testing from OpenBiome. The company says it has not previously screened donors for EPEC, a position based on international and national guidelines, but will immediately implement EPEC screening by PCR into its donor screening protocol.

“In addition to updating and implementing STEC and EPEC screening into our quality and safety protocols, OpenBiome is also working with FDA to implement retrospective screening of units to ensure that available material meets these new standards,” the company said.

After reporting the infections to the FDA, OpenBiome received information that two additional FMT recipients who received stool from the donor linked to the STEC infections had died. The company said in an update today that the treating clinician for one of the patients determined that the patient had died from underlying cardiac causes, and testing for STEC was not performed. In the second case, testing of donor material was negative for STEC.

“Therefore, it was determined that the death was unrelated to STEC,” the company said.

FMT safety issues

FMT has been found in several studies to be a highly effective treatment for recurrent C difficile infections that aren’t responding to antibiotics, and at least 10,000 FMT procedures for recurrent C difficile are performed each year. FMT is also being investigated for treating other conditions in more than 300 trials.

The idea behind the procedure is to introduce healthy bacteria from a donor into the gut microbiome of a sick recipient and restore the balance between good and bad bacteria.

But this is the second safety alert issued by the FDA regarding FMT. In June 2019, the agency warned of the potential for dangerous infections after two FMT patients developed drug-resistant bloodstream infections and one died, and the agency halted a number of FMT trials until additional screening measures could be put in place. A subsequent paper in the New England Journal of Medicine revealed that the two patients, both of whom were enrolled in clinical trials at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, had extended-spectrum beta-lacatamase (ESBL)-producing E coli in their blood.

The two patients had both received stool from Mass General that came from the same donor. While the hospital had screened the stool for C difficile and the presence of drug-resistant pathogens by the hospital, it had not screened it for ESBL-producing E coli. The authors of the paper could not conclusively attribute the infections to FMT, but suspected the patients likely acquired the pathogen from the procedure.

RESOURCE:  http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2020/03/fda-warns-about-infections-linked-fecal-microbiota-transplants?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium

 

 

National and State Healthcare-associated Infection (HAI) Progress Report from the CDC 2019

Between 2016 and 2017, healthcare-associated infections decreased in the United States, according to the most recent National and State HAI Progress Report   from the CDC.

The report includes a summary of rates for select HAIs across four settings: acute care hospitals, critical access hospitals, inpatient rehabilitation facilities and long-term acute care hospitals.

Key findings from the report include:

1. Central line-associated bloodstream infections saw a 9 percent decrease, with the largest decrease occurring in hospital wards.

2. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections dropped by 5 percent, with ICUs showing the largest decrease of 8 percent.

3. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia declined by 8 percent and Clostridioides difficile events reduced by 13 percent.

4. Ventilator-associated events and surgical site infections both decreased, by 3 percent and 1 percent respectively. The decrease in SSIs was related to 10 procedures tracked in the report.

5. There were no significant decreases or increases in abdominal hysterectomy SSIs and colon surgery SSIs.

 

Source:  https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/quality/hais-decreased-in-2017-c-diff-down-13-mrsa-down-8.html

Study Investigators Find Combination of Vancomycin and FMT Superior In Treating Recurrent C.difficile Infection (rCDI)

The combination of vancomycin and fecal microbiota transplantation was found to be superior to fidaxomicin or vancomycin in the treatment of patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI), according to a study published in Gastroenterology.

This randomized, single-center trial was designed to compare the efficacy of fecal microbiota transplantation with that of fidaxomicin and vancomycin.

Sixty-four adults with recurrent CDI seen at a gastroenterology clinic in Denmark between April 5, 2016 and June 10, 2018 were randomly assigned to a group receiving fecal microbiota transplantation applied by colonoscopy or nasojejunal tube after 4 to 10 days of 125 mg vancomycin 4 times daily (n=24), or 10 days of 200 mg fidaxomicin 2 times daily (n=24), or 10 days of 125 mg vancomycin 4 times daily (n=16).

Patients experiencing a CDI recurrence after this course of treatment, and those who could not be randomly assigned were provided rescue fecal microbiota transplantation. The primary study outcome was combined clinical resolution and negative polymerase chain reaction test for C difficile toxin at 8 weeks post-treatment, and secondary end points included week 8 clinical resolution.

The combination of negative C difficile test results and clinical resolution was observed in 71% of the 24 participants who received fecal microbiota transplantation (95% CI, 49-87%; n=17), 33% of the 24 participants who received fidaxomicin (95% CI, 16-55%; n=8), and 19% of the 16 participants (95% CI, 5-46%; n=3) who received vancomycin (fecal microbiota transplantation vs fidaxomicinP=.009; fecal microbiota transplantation vs vancomycin, P=.001; fidaxomicin vs vancomycin, P=.31). Clinical resolution was observed in 92% of participants who received fecal microbiota transplantation (n=22; P=.0002), 42% of participants who were treated with fidaxomicin (n=10; <.0001), and 19% of participants who were treated with vancomycin (n=3; P=.13). No significant differences in results were seen between patients receiving initial fecal microbiota transplantation therapy and those who received rescue treatment with such a transplant.

Of note, adverse events (transient abdominal pain, constipation, bloating and diarrhea) were observed in 10 of the participants who received a fecal microbiota transplant, 1 of which was classified as severe.

Researchers noted limitation of a lack of patients with C difficile ribotype 027, such that results may not be generalizable to settings with a high ribotype 027 frequency. Study interventions were also unblinded, introducing the possibility of observer bias, although the C difficile toxin test was applied to all patients at all time points in an effort to obtain objective outcome measures.

Study investigators concluded, “[fecal microbiota transplantation] was superior to both fidaxomicin and vancomycin monotherapies for [recurrent] CDI, with regard to both combined clinical and microbiological resolution and clinical resolution alone.”

Reference

https://www.infectiousdiseaseadvisor.com/respiratory/new-powder-formulation-tuberculosis-vaccine-candidate-is-in-human-trial/article/829508/

Hvas CL, Jørgensen SMD, Jørgensen SP, et al. Fecal microbiota transplantation is superior to fidaxomicin for treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection [published online January 2, 2019]. Gastroenterology. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2018.12.019