Category Archives: Healthcare Professional Resources

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Mena Boules, MD


The C Diff Foundation welcomes Mena Boules, MD.  Dr. Boules joins the Foundation in a volunteer role: non-executive,
Director Of the Educational Healthcare Outreach Program, In this capacity, Dr. Boules will have responsibilities as an organizational advisor, a leading participant in the educational healthcare outreach program developing initiatives to be shared within the healthcare community.

Dr. Boules received his medical degree from the University Of Alexandria Faculty of Medicine. He spent many years at the Cleveland Clinic for clinical training and research in the field of general surgery, bariatric surgery, and surgical endoscopy, and gastroenterology. Since then he has joined the pharmaceutical industry and has served in several roles within US Medical affairs in gastroenterology, and the growing field of the microbiome. Currently, Dr. Boules is Medical Director in Gastroenterology US Medical Affairs at Takeda Pharmaceuticals.

Researchers Conduct Study To Establish a Quantitative Correlation Between Applied Alcohol-Based Hand Rub ABHR Volume and Achieved Hand Coverage Utilizing an Innovate Quantitative Evaluation System

A large-scale investigation of alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR) volume: hand coverage correlations utilizing an innovative quantitative evaluation system

  • Constantinos Voniatis,
  • Száva Bánsághi,
  • Andrea Ferencz &
  • Tamás Haidegger

 

Abstract

Background

Current hand hygiene guidelines do not provide recommendations on a specific volume for the clinical hand rubbing procedure. According to recent studies volume should be adjusted in order to achieve complete coverage. However, hand size is a parameter that highly influences the hand coverage quality when using alcohol-based hand rubs (ABHR). The purpose of this study was to establish a quantitative correlation between applied ABHR volume and achieved hand coverage.

Method

ABHR based hand hygiene events were evaluated utilizing a digital health device, the Semmelweis hand hygiene system with respect to coverage achieved on the skin surface. Medical students and surgical residents (N = 356) were randomly selected and given predetermined ABHR volumes. Additionally, hand sizes were calculated using specialized software developed for this purpose. Drying time, ABHR volume awareness, as well spillage awareness were documented for each hand hygiene event.

Results

Hand coverage achieved during a hand hygiene event strongly depends on the applied ABHR volume. At a 1 ml dose, the uncovered hand area was approximately 7.10%, at 2 ml it decreased to 1.68%, and at 3 ml it further decreased to 1.02%. The achieved coverage is strongly correlated to hand size, nevertheless, a 3 ml applied volume proved sufficient for most hand hygiene events (84%). When applying a lower amount of ABHR (1.5 ml), even people with smaller hands failed to cover their entire hand surface. Furthermore, a 3 ml volume requires more than the guideline prescribed 20–30 s to dry. In addition, results suggest that drying time is not only affected by hand size but perhaps other factors may be involved as well (e.g., skin temperature and degree of hydration). ABHR volumes of 3.5 ml or more were inefficient, as the disinfectant spilled while the additional rubbing time did not improve hand coverage.

Conclusions

Hand sizes differ a lot among HCWs. After objectively measuring participants, the surface of the smallest hand was just over half compared to the largest hand (259 cm2 and 498 cm2, respectively). While a 3 ml ABHR volume is reasonable for medium-size hands, the need for an optimized volume of hand rub for each individual is critical, as it offers several advantages. Not only it can ensure adequate hand hygiene quality, but also prevent unnecessary costs. Bluntly increasing the volume also increases spillage and therefore waste of disinfectant in the case of smaller hands. In addition, adherence could potentially decrease due to the required longer drying time, therefore, adjusting the dosage according to hand size may also increase the overall hand hygiene compliance.

To read this Abstract in its entirety please click on the link below to be redirected. Thank you.

https://aricjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13756-021-00917-8/

Please — Do Not Take Medicine Into Your Own Hands, You Are NOT Out Of Options

Do-It-Yourself Treatments Could Be Fatal……

You are NOT out of options………………………

During these unprecedented times, we understand the patient’s frustration and how this pandemic has created a halt to the readily accessible alternative treatment option in the FMT community.   The need for continued treatments for a C. diff. infection and recurrent C. diff. infections are real and necessary. We also understand how patients experiencing
recurrent C. difficile infections are desperately seeking the FMT alternative treatment.

C Diff Foundation is able to provide information about treatments available to safely treat  CDI’s and recurrent C. diff. infections.

Most home remedies or natural therapies, though, haven’t been put through the same rigorous clinical testing you expect from pharmaceutical medications.

In a world where you can fix almost anything with a do-it-yourself video on YouTube, you might think curing your own illness would be a piece of cake. It might be if it weren’t for a couple of (not so small) sticking points.  One, the home remedy recommended by your friend — or one of the many websites promoting “natural therapies” — might not work.1  Dr. Harriet Hall, a retired family physician, former Air Force flight surgeon, and author of the SkepDoc column in Skeptic magazine, is one of those leading the charge against medical “treatments” not supported by science.  Like others in the medical and scientific community, ……. There is the only medicine that has been tested and proven to work, and medicine that hasn’t,” Hall told Healthline. 1

Talk to your medical professional/s.

Discuss medications and clinical trials available.

Do Not Share Antibiotics.

Responses to an anonymous online questionnaire of 496 parents, researchers at the Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York reported that 48 percent of the parents surveyed said they’ve held onto leftover antibiotics. More troubling to researchers was that of those parents, 73 percent reported giving those antibiotics to siblings, unrelated children, and unrelated adults.  This would sometimes occur months after the drugs were originally prescribed.
Dr. Ruth Milanaik, director of the neonatal neurodevelopment follow-up program at Cohen and senior author of the study, says the results show an “alarming” percentage of parents engaging in sharing or borrowing antibiotics, a practice known as prescription diversion.  “This is dangerous not only for those given antibiotics that weren’t prescribed for them but for entire populations of people who some antibiotics may no longer help when the bacteria they target become resistant to them,” Milanaik said in a statement. 2

Discuss Resources available.

Times are trying during these unprecedented times and you are not without hope – we would like to help you and not see you get hurt or even worse. Please take time to speak to your treating physician and consider contacting a C Diff Foundation Triage Nurse at 727-205-3922 to learn more about safe and effective treatments available and options available to you at this time of desperation.

Remember – You  Are Not Out of Options.

Stay safe – and please – Do NOT take medicine into your own hands.

Thank You!

Resources:
1 Foxnews.com
2 Healthline.com