Tag Archives: gut health

Patient, Family, Caregiver January Symposium Broadcasts During March On C. diff. Spores and More Live Program

CDIFFRADIO.COM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAVE THE DATES to listen in to the leading topic expert presentations

shared on January 15, 2021, at the Patient, Family, Caregiver Symposium:

Beginning Tuesday, March 9 from 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. EST following through on

March 16,  March 23, and  March 30.

A Symposium specifically developed for Patients Diagnosed With a C. diff. Infection, Being Treated For a Clostridioides diffiicile infection, Recovering From a Clostridioides difficile Infection and Recurrences with Family Members and Caregivers.

The Patient & Family C. diff. Symposium was a gathering of healthcare professionals, keynote speakers, health advocates, practitioners, educators, thought leaders, and patients who are transforming the patient experience and changing the way people experience
C. diff. infections worldwide.

Unlike other conferences on this topic, patients will share their C. diff. infection journeys, providing a real-world perspective on patient experience. Our attendees will learn more from this virtual-online symposium and gain knowledge on important topics that will better aid their care and recovery through tools and strategies delivered by keynote speakers.  

The Symposium followed the C Diff Foundation Mission statement –   Educating and Advocating for the prevention, treatments, clinical trials, diagnostics, and environmental safety of Clostridioides difficile
(C. diff.) infections worldwide.

Keynote speakers presented up-to-date data to expand on the existing knowledge and provide important information focused on, yet not limited to,  a Clostridioides difficile infection (also known as C. diff., C. difficile, CDAD, CDI) ……

  • Prevention
  • Treatments
  • Diagnostics
  • Research
  • Environmental Safety
  • Clinical trials and studies

WITH

  • Introduction to Microbiome Research and Studies
  • Infection Prevention
  • Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants
  • Antibiotic Stewardship

We hope you enjoy the broadcasts!

 

Program Chair:  Paul Feuerstadt, MD, FACG

Barbara McGovern, MD     “Treatment of recurrent C. difficile infection with                                                                                        SER-109, an investigational microbiome drug.”

Paul Feuerstadt, MD          ” C. diff. Overview – What is a C. diff. Infection?”

Sahil Khanna, MD               “C. diff. Treatments + FMT Overview. “

 

 

 

Simon Cutting, Ph. D.         “Bacillus, and C. diff.  Spore Overview. “

Teena Chopra, MD                ” Introduction to Infection Prevention.”

Doe Kley, RN, MPH              “C. diff. Transitioning from Hospital to Home. “

Courtney Jones                    ” Microbiome, Microbiota, and Gut Health.”

Denise Cardo, MD                “Everyone Has a Role in Antibiotic Awareness.”

Larry Kociolek, MD              “C. diff. Infections in Pediatrics.”

Kathy Bischoff                        “My C. diff.  Journey.”

Renata Johnson                      “My C. diff. Journey.”

Paul Feuerstadt, MD      &    Barbara McGovern, MD

 

This Symposium was hosted by the C Diff Foundation and

Sponsored by Seres Therapeutics  

Clostridioides diffiicle Thrives In an Inflammed Environement ….Research Study From North Carolina State University

Clostridioides difficile thrives in an inflamed environment by generating toxins that support prolonged infection, according to a study from North Carolina State University.

The study, published in Nature Communications, showed how C. diff produces toxins that cause inflammation, eliminating competing bacteria and releasing peptides and amino acids that support the growth of C. diff.

C. diff thrives when other microbes in the gut are absent – which is why it is more prevalent following antibiotic therapy,” corresponding author Casey Theriot, Ph.D., associate professor of infectious disease at North Carolina State University, said. “But when colonizing the gut,
C. diff. also produces two large toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause inflammation. We wanted to know if these inflammation-causing toxins actually give C. diff a survival benefit – whether the pathogen can exploit an inflamed environment in order to thrive.”

Investigators examined two variants of C. diff in vitro and in an antibiotic-treated mouse model. The variants included a wild type C. diff that produces toxins and a genetically modified variant that does not. They found that the wild type C. diff, associated with toxin production, generated more inflammation and tissue damage than the mutant.

To read the article in its entirety, please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.contagionlive.com/view/clostridioides-difficile-thrives-in-inflamed-environment

Investigators also found changes in the expression of metabolic genes, with C. diff in the inflamed environment expressing more genes related to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism that sustains growth.

C. diff’s toxins damage the cells that line the gut,” Theriot said. “These cells contain collagen, which is made up of amino acids and peptides. When collagen is degraded by toxins,
C. diff responds by turning on expression of genes that can use these amino acids for growth.”

Inflammation provided a second benefit to C. diff by creating an inhospitable environment for other bacteria that compete for nutrients. Bacteroidaceae were present in control groups that weren’t infected with toxin-producing C. diff, which was consistent with previous studies that found negative associations between C. diff and Bacteroidaceae.

“I always found it interesting that C. diff causes such intense inflammation,” first author Josh Fletcher, Ph.D., a former postdoctoral researcher at North Carolina State University, said. “Our research shows that this inflammation may contribute to the persistence of C. diff in the gut environment, prolonging infection.”

C. diff is the most significant cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea, causing more than 223,900 infections and 12,800 deaths in the US in 2017, according to a recent report.

The disease has two phases, a spore phase, and vegetative phase. Toxins are released during the vegetative phase, causing diarrhea and other symptoms. But the pathogen is often transmitted during the spore phase, during which it is hardy and isn’t susceptible to gastric acids and alcohol-based hand sanitizer, experts explained during a recent discussion of the disease.

Risks for infection include exposure to C. diff spores and antibiotic use. An investigational drug to prevent the disruption of the gut microbiota by antibiotics is among the most recent developments in the fight against a C diff. infection.

 

Proton-Pump Inhibitors and Increased Risk of C. diff. Infections

 

 

 

 

 

Increased risk for Clostridium difficile (C diff) infection remained elevated for up to a year after the conclusion of treatment with proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), according to a paper published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

Malin Inghammar, PhD

Source and to read the article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.hcplive.com/view/elevated-risk-c-diff-proton-pump-inhibitor-use

Investigators from Copenhagen, Denmark used a nationwide cohort of adults with
a C diff infection in order to compare periods with and without exposure to PPIs. The adults were all treated between February 2010 and December 2013. The nationwide database included health information such as C diff testing, filled prescriptions, and patient characteristics. The investigators also accounted for the previous hospitalization in the previous 12 weeks in the patients, in addition to chronic disease, genetics, socioeconomic status, length of hospital stay, and antibiotic and corticosteroid use.

Ultimately, the study authors identified 3583 episodes of community-acquired C diff infection, of which 964 occurred during the current use of PPIs. This is an observation in the current literature, but what wasn’t understood was the full extent of the relationship due to missing data from randomized controlled trials, variability between studies, and insufficient adjustment for confounding.

“While a history of prior hospital admission, advanced age, and antibiotic use are well-known risk factors for C diff infection, the role of PPIs has remained controversial,” the study authors wrote.

The investigators defined new PPI use as a new prescription for individuals who had not used PPI in the prior 365 days. They split up the periods of 0-6 months and 6-12 months because in the first period, cessation was considered indeterminate use because of the possibility for intermittent use or drug exposure continuing beyond the use period. Exposure during the 6-12 month period was “unlikely.”

Of the infections that occurred with the use of PPIs, 324 occurred within 0-6 months after treatment conclusion. Additionally, 123 cases occurred between 6 and 12 months after treatment cessation.

The remainder of C diff infection cases occurred during time periods without use of PPIs, the investigators said.

Comparing the use of PPIs with nonuse, the study authors found that the adjusted estimate incidence rate ratio (IRR) was 2.03, they said. But the risk remained elevated in later time periods too: 1.54 for 0-6 months and 1.24 for 6-12 months.

“In conclusion, in this nationwide study in Denmark, we showed that exposure to PPIs was associated with a moderate increase in the risk of community-acquired C diff infection,” the study authors said while noting that the mechanism by which PPIs may increase the C diff infection risk remains unclear. “The increased risk was most prominent during current PPI use but also persisted after treatment discontinuation.”

One limitation the study authors provided for was that initial symptoms of C diff infection could have been misinterpreted and patients prescribed PPIs could not be excluded. But, they also admitted, “it is unlikely that this would lead to biased results because the symptoms of C diff infection (diarrhea) are distinct from the upper gastrointestinal symptoms that represent the most common indication for PPIs.”

Rebiotix and the C Diff Foundation Applaud the State of Minnesota as it Declares November C. difficile Infection Awareness Month

 Rebiotix Inc., a clinical-stage microbiome company focused on harnessing the power of the human microbiome to treat challenging diseases, and the C Diff Foundation have joined today to voice support for the State of Minnesota in declaring November “C. difficile Infection Awareness Month.

Rebiotix and the C Diff Foundation believe this important action by Governor Mark Dayton and his administration adds significant weight to the ongoing effort to prevent and treat Clostridium difficile infection (C. diff.), which is a national health concern resulting in more than 500,000 infections and 29,000 deaths annually.

C. diff infection is a debilitating and potentially life-threatening condition that is now recognized as the number one healthcare associated infection in the U.S.,” said Lee Jones, president and CEO of Rebiotix.  “Increasing the awareness of this disease is important.  We applaud both the C Diff Foundation and the State of Minnesota in its effort to build awareness of this significant health concern and welcome the opportunity to be at the forefront of developing a potentially new treatment for patients to address the most challenging of C. diff infections.”

Rebiotix’s first product, RBX2660,  is intended to prevent recurrent C. diff infections. RBX2660 is currently the subject of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 3 clinical trial to evaluate its efficacy and safety for the prevention of recurrent C. diff infection and is Rebiotix’s most clinically advanced drug product developed from the company’s Microbiota Restoration Therapy (MRT) platform.   Rebiotix is also advancing RBX7455, a lyophilized, non-frozen, oral capsule formulation of its MRT technology in an investigator sponsored Phase 1 study for the prevention of recurrent C. diff infection.

“The ability to prevent and potentially eradicate recurrent C. diff infection requires leadership from across the landscape of healthcare, from government institutions to advocacy to academia to emerging biotechnology companies,” said Nancy Caralla, founder of the C Diff Foundation.  “We commend the State of Minnesota and Rebiotix as each seeks to play an important role in reducing the rate and impact of C. diff infection.”

About Clostridium difficile Infection
Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infection is a serious and potentially fatal gastrointestinal disease, characterized by severe diarrhea, fever, and loss of appetite. It is a leading healthcare-associated infection (HAI), and in the U.S. alone, there are about 500,000 people infected and over 29,000 deaths annually from the disease. Currently, 20-30% of patients with C. diff. go on to experience more than one episode of the disease, which is known as recurrent C. diff. infection. Recurrent C. diff. infection is especially challenging to treat as, to date, there are no approved microbial-based drugs to treat patients with two or more recurrences.

About the C Diff Foundation
The C Diff Foundation, a 501(c) (3)  non-profit organization, established in 2012, and comprised of 100% volunteering professionals dedicated at supporting public health through education and advocating for C. difficile infection (CDI) prevention, treatments, environmental safety, and support worldwide.  The Foundation’s founder is a Nurse and after suffering through C. difficile infections herself and witnessing the loss of her Father, whose life was claimed by C. difficile involvement, the C Diff Foundation came to fruition.  The C Diff Foundation Members, with  their Volunteer Patient Advocates, successfully “Raise C. diff. Awareness”  nationwide and in fifty-six  (56) countries and host a U.S. Nationwide information Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) to support health care providers, patients, and families manage through the difficulties of a C. diff. infection among many other programs.

About Rebiotix Inc.
Rebiotix Inc. is a late-stage clinical microbiome company focused on harnessing the power of the human microbiome to revolutionize the treatment of challenging diseases. Rebiotix possesses a deep and diverse clinical pipeline, with its lead drug candidate, RBX2660, in Phase 3 clinical development for the prevention of recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infection.  RBX2660 has been granted Fast Track status and Breakthrough Therapy designation from the FDA for its potential to prevent recurrent C. diff. infection. Rebiotix’s clinical pipeline also features RBX7455, a lyophilized non-frozen, oral capsule formulation, which is currently the subject of an investigator-sponsored Phase 1 trial for the prevention of recurrent C. diff. infection.  In addition, Rebiotix is targeting several other disease states with drug products built on its pioneering Microbiota Restoration Therapy (MRT) platform.  MRT is a standardized, stabilized drug technology that is designed to rehabilitate the human microbiome by delivering a broad consortium of live microbes into a patient’s intestinal tract via a ready-to-use and easy-to-administer format. For more information on Rebiotix and its pipeline of human microbiome-directed therapies, visit www.rebiotix.com.

C Diff Foundation Celebrates National Volunteer Week 2017

National Volunteer Week, April 23 – 29th

The C Diff Foundation celebrates National Volunteer Week, April 23 – 29 to recognize more than 150 members of the C Diff Foundation Volunteer Members, including Volunteer Patient Advocates, have collectively donated more than 20,000 hours of volunteer service to the Foundation last year. The theme for this year’s celebration is “Sharing Time, Touching Lives.”

“Through the years the C Diff Foundation Volunteer Members have served as ambassadors of goodwill, service and compassion,” said Angelo Ortiz, C Diff Foundation’s Treasurer and Chairperson of  the Volunteer Patient Advocate Program

The C Diff Foundation, a 501(c) (3)  non-profit organization, established in 2012, and comprised of 100% volunteering professionals dedicated at supporting public health through education and advocating for C. difficile infection (CDI) prevention, treatments, environmental safety, and support worldwide

Not only do the volunteer members provide financial support for the C Diff Foundation’s programs — it is through their dedication and passion that continuously expands the Foundation’s mission.  Some volunteer patient advocates have their own unique C. diff. Survivor Journey which is shared with compassion, dedication, and caring hearts touching patients, students, fellow healthcare professionals,  and residents in the community every day.

Volunteer members will be recognized on November 9th & 10th  during the C Diff Foundation’s
5th Annual International C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health EXPO being hosted
in Las Vegas, NV.  During the annual event the “Volunteer Shooting Star” awards will
be presented along with numerous Volunteer Patient Advocate certificates for service hours.

“We are fortunate to have such kind and giving volunteers,” said Nancy C. Caralla, Foundress and Executive Director of the C Diff Foundation, “It is an honor to recognize those who have selflessly given so much to help educate, and promote the Foundation’s mission worldwide.”

The C Diff Foundation Volunteer Program was organized in 2012 to provide volunteer services, promote community understanding of Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) CDI  Infection Prevention, Treatments, Environmental Safety and Support and to raise funds for special C Diff Foundation patient/family programs.

The C Diff Foundation Members, with  the Volunteer Patient Advocates, successfully promote
C. diff. Awareness”  nationwide and in fifty-six  (56) countries and host a
U.S. Nationwide information Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) to support health care providers, patients, and families guiding them through the difficulties caused by a C. diff. infection.

Volunteers Members serve in 12 different committees;  Volunteers host monthly teleconference support sessions; Provide Education about C. diff. infection and other linked healthcare topics through workshops, community events, and literature with patients, their families, and residents from villages to cities around the globe; Triage Nurses assist patients, families, clinicians with answers to prevention, treatment, environmental safety and support questions Monday – Friday 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. EST;  Register support session participants,; Provide IT management; Give clerical and social media assistance to various departments;  Provide a “Global Broadcasting Network” with www.cdiffradio.com with their educational radio
program,C. diff. Spores and More which broadcasts live every Tuesday at 1:00 p.m. EST. We are grateful for our sponsor Clorox Healthcare for making this program possible.  Each episode becomes a podcast and is accessible from the C. diff. Spores and More living library located on the main cdiffradio.com program page. Each November the Volunteer Members gather at the annual conference to both present and provide assistance in making the attendees feel welcome and expand their knowledge base on a variety of health topics that are linked to the main topic ~ Clostridium difficile infections.

For more information about the C Diff Foundation Volunteer Program, please call 919-201-1512 (toll free in USA 1-844-367-2343 ) or e-mail:   info@cdifffoundation.org

 

C Diff Foundation Volunteers — Helping Us  Help Others and The Beacon Of Light On the Other Side Of Pain and Suffering.