Tag Archives: FDA

U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Has Accepted 2 New Drug Applications (NDA) for DIFICID (fidaxomicin) In Children Aged Six Months Or Older

OCTOBER 2019

Merck

Known as MSD outside the United States and Canada

announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted for review a New Drug Application (NDA) for DIFICID ® (fidaxomicin) for oral suspension, and a supplemental NDA (sNDA) for a new indication for use of DIFICID tablets and oral suspension for the treatment of Clostridium (also known as Clostridioides ) difficile infections (CDI) in children aged six months or older. Both applications have received a priority review classification by the FDA. The Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA), or target action date for both applications, is set for Jan. 24, 2020. The investigational pediatric indication for DIFICID was granted Orphan Drug Designation (ODD) in 2010.

“Evidence indicates the increasing incidence of C. difficile -associated diarrhea among hospitalized children 1,” said Dr. Nicholas Kartsonis, senior vice president, Clinical Research, infectious diseases and vaccines, Merck Research Laboratories. “The filings for the pediatric indication for the new investigational oral suspension formulation of DIFICID, as well as for DIFICID tablets, underscore Merck’s focus and dedication to developing infectious disease treatments for those with unmet needs.”

The sNDA is based primarily on results of the Phase 3 SUNSHINE study 2, which were presented as part of the Late Breaker Oral Abstracts on Emerging Infections at IDWeek 2018 in San Francisco, California.

About DIFICID (fidaxomicin)

DIFICID is a macrolide antibacterial medicine indicated in adults (18 years of age or older) for treatment of Clostridium difficile -associated diarrhea (CDAD). To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of DIFICID and other antibacterial drugs, DIFICID should be used only to treat infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by Clostridiumdifficile. DIFICID is contraindicated in patients who have known hypersensitivity to fidaxomicin or any other ingredient in DIFICID. DIFICID should only be used for the treatment of C. difficile-associated diarrhea. DIFICID is not effective for the treatment of other types of infections due to minimal systemic absorption of fidaxomicin.

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http://www.oleantimesherald.com/business/fda-accepts-two-applications-for-merck-s-dificid-fidaxomicin-to/article_c1787f52-e9e0-5dd3-bb8c-adb22019d8b3.html

U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Grants Fast Track Status to Acurx Pharmaceuticals for New Investigational Antibiotic for Clostridium difficile Infection

FDA grants Fast Track status to new C difficile antibiotic

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Fast Track designation to a new investigational antibiotic for Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI), according to a press release yesterday from Acurx Pharmaceuticals.

ACX-362E is a novel, narrow-spectrum oral antibiotic based on inhibition of the enzyme DNA polymerase IIIC, which is required for bacterial replication and pathogenesis in C difficile.

The drug is currently being tested in a phase 1 clinical trial. The company expects to launch a phase 2 trial at the end of year.

Under the Fast Track designation, ACX-362E will receive expedited review from the FDA. The agency grants the designation to drugs that treat serious or life-threatening conditions and fulfill an unmet medical need. The CDC has identified C difficile, which sickens nearly 500,000 Americans each year, as an urgent threat.

“If approved, we believe our new antibacterial, ACX-362E, will be an important therapeutic alternative for patients with CDI,” Acurx managing partner Robert DeLuccia said in the press release. “The Fast Track designation will allow Acurx to work more closely with the FDA to bring ACX-362E to physicians and patients as soon as possible.”
Jan 16 Acurx Pharmaceuticals press release

Information Explaining the “Right to Try” Legislation and What It Means To Terminally Ill Patients

Q: What is the Right to Try Act?

A: Right To Try is legislation that allows terminally ill patients to access investigational treatments that have passed basic safety testing (Phase I) with the FDA, but are not yet available on pharmacy shelves.

Q: Why was Right To Try developed?

A: Over 1 million Americans die from a terminal illness every year. Many spend years searching for a potential cure, or struggle in vain to get accepted into a clinical trial. Unfortunately, FDA red tape and government regulations restrict access to promising new treatments, and for those who do get access, it’s often too late.

Q: Is Right To Try law in my state?

A: Right To Try has been signed into law in 38 states and counting: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Washington, and Wyoming. If your state is not listed, and you want to bring Right to Try to your state, click here to find out how.

For more information about the “right-to-try” legislation please click on the following link to be redirected:

http://righttotry.org/faq/

The Senate in August 2017 passed by unanimous consent a measure designed to make it easier for terminally ill patients to get access to experimental treatments without oversight from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

The “right-to-try” legislation has been championed by the libertarian Goldwater Institute, which has worked to pass similar legislation in 37+ states.

The federal version, now headed to the House, would bar the government from blocking patients from getting access to medications that have undergone only preliminary testing in humans. Patients first would have to try all other available treatments and be ineligible for clinical trials.

The bill would provide drug companies some legal protection if a treatment results in harm.

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To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.denverpost.com/2017/08/03/right-to-try-terminally-ill-patients-experimental-drugs-fda/

 

 

 

 

Learn More About Clostridium difficile (C.diff., C.difficile) infection and Recurrent CDI Clinical Trials In Progress

 

 

 

The C Diff Foundation has implemented a global campaign to raise awareness of Clostridium difficile infection (C.difficile) clinical trials, clinical studies, clinical research and observational studies evaluating interventions for C. difficile prevention, treatments, and environmental safety.

In the USA: Nearly half a million Americans suffer from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released in 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of C. difficile. Of those, about 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly attributable to C. difficile infections making C. difficile a very important cause of infectious disease death in the United States.

“Clostridium difficile infections are not only the most common cause of healthcare-acquired infections in the United States but also very common in the community in younger patients who previously were thought to be less susceptible to C. difficile. The rate of recurrent C. difficile infections is increasing tremendously and this increase is higher than the rate of primary C. difficile infections,” stated Sahil Khanna, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Director of the C. difficile Clinic, Fecal Microbiota Transplantation program and C. difficile related Clinical Trials, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Dr. Khanna also added, “It is imperative and important for clinical trials to be done to advance the development of new treatments, new medications, and new ways to prevent and treat Clostridium difficile infections.”

Individuals volunteer to participate in clinical trials in hopes of improving their own health, to access treatments that might not be available otherwise, often because they are new and not yet widely available. They help others by contributing to advances in medicine. There can also be potential risks participating in clinical trials and clinical studies. All of the known risks associated with a particular trial and or study will be discussed during the informed consent process. It will be thoroughly explained in the informed consent document that a volunteer will receive from the research staff prior to participating in any study.

To learn more about clinical research (e.g., Clostridium difficile, C.difficile) visit the U.S. Food and Drug Administration http://www.fda.gov or telephone 1-800-835-4709, The National Institutes of Health (NIH) http://www.nih.gov and ClinicalTrials.gov.

“Clinical trials are vital to improving our knowledge about how best to prevent and treat C. difficile infections. Informing patients of clinical trials is important, and in recent years several clinical trials have led to significant improvements in the treatments available for patients with C. difficile infections,” stated Mark Wilcox, MD, FRCPath, Consultant Microbiologist, Head of Microbiology and Academic Lead of Pathology Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Professor of Medical Microbiology University of Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Lead on Clostridium difficile for Public Health England, UK.

About the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA):
The FDA is responsible for protecting the public health by assuring that foods are safe, wholesome, sanitary and properly labeled; ensuring that human and veterinary drug, and vaccines and other biological products and medical devices intended for human use are safe and effective. FDA’s responsibilities extend to the 50 United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and other U.S. territories and possessions.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH):
The National Institutes of Health (NIH), a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is the nation’s medical research agency making important discoveries that improve health and save lives.

About ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov is a Web-based resource that provides patients, their family members, health care professionals, researchers, and the public with easy access to information on publicly and privately supported clinical studies on a wide range of diseases and conditions.

SYN-004 (ribaxamase) For C. difficile Prevention Advances; U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Has Granted A Breakthrough Therapy Designation

On May 11, 2017 Synthetic Biologics, Inc. a late-stage clinical company developing therapeutics that preserve the microbiome to protect and restore the health of patients, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted a Breakthrough Therapy Designation for SYN-004 (ribaxamase) for the prevention of Clostridium difficile infection.

SYN-004 (ribaxamase) is the Company’s first-in-class oral enzyme designed to protect the gut microbiome from disruption caused by certain intravenous (IV) beta-lactam antibiotics.

The Breakthrough Therapy Designation is based on data from the successful Phase 2b clinical trial of ribaxamase, which met its primary endpoint of significantly reducing CDI. FDA Breakthrough Therapy Designation is intended to expedite development and review timelines when preliminary clinical evidence indicates that a drug may demonstrate substantial improvement on one or more clinically significant endpoints over available therapies for serious or life threatening diseases. If approved by the FDA, SYN-004 (ribaxamase) would be the first available drug designed to prevent Clostridium difficile infection by protecting the gut microbiome from antibiotic-mediated dysbiosis.

“We are delighted by the FDA’s recognition of ribaxamase’s potential to prevent CDI, and the dire need to fill the current void of an approved intervention,” said Jeffrey Riley, President and Chief Executive Officer. “Following this announcement, we have been asked and anticipate requesting a Type-B multidisciplinary meeting with the Agency for a comprehensive discussion on the overarching, high-level drug development plan and pathway to licensure for ribaxamase. We look forward to working closely with the FDA throughout the development and review process and remain dedicated to bringing this potentially paradigm-shifting approach to antibiotic therapy to patients in critical need.”

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C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network 

www.cdiffradio.com

Protecting the Gut Microbiome: A Paradigm Shift in Managing GI Disorders

Live Broadcast On Tuesday, May 16th Join us with our guest, Dr. Joseph Sliman, MD, MPH, Chief Medical Officer of Synthetic Biologics.  Dr. Sliman will be discussing  the protection of the natural gut microbiome from the unintended consequences of intravenous (IV) antibiotics which are excreted into the gut is expected to protect against opportunistic enteric infections. Synthetic Biologics is developing two microbiome-focused drug candidates in Phase 3 development including, SYN-004 (ribaxamase) which is designed to protect the gut microbiome by degrading certain IV beta-lactam antibiotics for the prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), pathogenic
overgrowth and the emergence of antimicrobial resistance, and SYN-010 which is intended to reduce the impact of methane producing organisms in the gut microbiome to treat an underlying cause of irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C).

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To learn more about Synthetic Biologics, please click on the link provided below

.http://www.syntheticbiologics.com/about/overview

Source:  Synthetic Biologics

Synthetic Biologics – Protecting the Gut Microbiome: A Paradigm Shift in Managing GI Disorders

U.S. Panel To the Food and Drug Administration Voted 10-5 In Favor For Merck & Co. ‘s bezlotoxumab Effective At Preventing A Recurrence Of C. diff. Infection

NewsUpdate

 Merck & Co’s experimental drug to treat the most common hospital-associated infectious diarrhea
* Clostridium difficile  *  warrants approval, an advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Thursday.

 

The panel voted 10-5, with one abstention, that the drug, bezlotoxumab, was effective in preventing a recurrence of infection with Clostridium difficile, or C. difficile, a germ that causes inflammation of the colon and potentially fatal diarrhea.

The FDA is not obliged to follow the advice of its advisory panels but typically does.

The panel’s vote follows an internal review by FDA staff which found an apparent decrease in recurrence of C. difficile but expressed concern as to whether the drug could hurt the cure rate of the initial C. difficile episode.

Panelists who voted in favor of the drug acknowledged the FDA’s concerns but said they were persuaded there was a need for new targeted therapies and this one seems effective.

“We haven’t had a new drug for C. difficile in our armamentarium for some time,” Dr. Joanna Schaenman, assistant professor of medicine at UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, said.

MORE about bezlotoxumab :   https://cdifffoundation.org/category/clinical-trials/

Merck & Co.   bezlotoxumab was successful in two Phase III trials against the recurrence of

Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection when combined with antibiotics.

Currently, there are no therapies approved for the prevention of recurrent disease caused by C. difficile.

Bezlotoxumab’s approval would also make it the first antibody to treat bacterial infection.

Scientists say mAbs would have benefits over small molecule antibiotics because they are less likely to drive antimicrobial resistance and are administered less frequently. “Results of these studies showed that a single, one-time infusion of the antitoxin bezlotoxumab given with standard of care C. difficile antibiotic treatment significantly reduced the recurrence of C. difficile infection compared to standard of care alone, and demonstrated this benefit over a 12-week period,” said lead investigator Mark Wilcox of the University of Leeds, UK. “These results were also demonstrated in patient subgroups known to be at high risk for C. difficile recurrence.”

C. difficile toxin B can damage the gut wall and cause inflammation, leading to the symptoms of C. difficile enteritis, which include abdominal pain and watery diarrhea. Bezlotoxumab, a fully-human monoclonal antibody, was developed by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s MassBiologics Laboratory with Medarex (now part of Bristol-Myers Squibb), and licensed to Merck in 2009.

The studies   Merck’s studies took more than 1,000 patients each and evaluated them over 12 weeks. Participants received either a single infusion of bezlotoxumab, actoxumab (another mAb designed to fight C. difficile),a combination of the two, or a placebo. The actoxumab arm of the study ended early for efficacy and safety reasons.    Both studies had infection recurrence as their primary endpoint – this rate was significantly lower for the bezlotoxumab arms (17.4% and 15.7%) and bezlotoxumab plus actoxumab arms (15.9% and 14.9%), compared to placebos (27.6% and 25.7%). Actoxumab was found not to provide extra benefit on its own or combined with bezlotoxumab, so Merck’s marketing authorisation application is for bezlotoxumab alone.

The FDA is due to make its decision by July 23.

 

TO READ ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW:

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/health/us-regulatory-panel-backs/2860152.html

Fecal Transplants (FMT) Treating Clostridium difficile Infections; U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Seeks Comment on What Investigational New Drug (IND) Requirements To Waive

Fecal Transplants to Treat C. difficile: FDA Seeks Comment on What IND Requirements to Waive

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The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Monday February 29, 2016,announced new draft guidance that aims to further assure that patients infected with the bacterium Clostridium difficile and not responding to standard therapies can access poop transplants, also known as fecal microbiota for transplantation (FMT).

FDA considers FMT an investigational new drug (IND), which requires physicians and scientists to file an IND application if they intend to use the treatment for clinical practice or research.

However, FDA has issued guidance stating that FMT may be used to treat 

C. difficile infection not responsive to standard therapies outside of a clinical trial. 

New Guidance

The latest draft guidance offers new notice that FDA intends to exercise enforcement discretion regarding the IND requirements for the use of FMT to treat C. difficile infection.

As far as what FDA wants to discuss on this new draft guidance, the agency says it’s requesting comments on which IND requirements are appropriate to waive.

In particular, FDA is requesting comments on the requirement for institutional review board review of the use of FMT to treat patients with C. difficile infection not responding to standard therapies when the FMT is provided by a stool bank,” FDA says.

Background

The draft guidance comes as over the past few years, FMT, which basically involves the transfer of a healthy donor stool to the bowel of a patient infected with C. difficile, has emerged as an effective means to treat recurrent forms of the bacterial infections, according to a study in the Journal of Law and Biosciences.

Rachel Sachs, an academic fellow at Harvard University’s Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology and Bioethics, and an author of that study, explained to Focus that previously FDA said it would regulate FMT like a biologic, but that the decentralized, hospital-based model of FMT envisioned in this new draft guidance more closely resembles the agency’s models for regulating tissue or cord blood products.

Two companies – Rebiotix and Seres Therapeutics – have been granted orphan drug designations for their INDs as FMT treatments for recurrent C. difficile infections, which affect between 85,000 and 110,000 people in the US annually.

And Sachs said she’s under the assumption that once a company gets FDA approval for their FMT product, FDA will revoke its enforcement discretion included in this new guidance.

Guidance Details

FDA said Monday it intends to use this discretion for waiving certain IND requirements, provided that:

  • The licensed health care provider treating the patient obtains consent from the patient or his or her legally authorized representative for the use of FMT products. The consent should include, at a minimum, a statement that the use of FMT products to treat C. difficile is investigational and a discussion of its reasonably foreseeable risks;
  • The FMT product is not obtained from a stool bank; and
  • The stool donor and stool are qualified by screening and testing performed under the direction of the licensed health care provider for the purpose of providing the FMT product for treatment of the patient.

And FDA makes clear that an establishment that collects or prepares FMT products “solely under the direction of licensed health care providers for the purpose of treating their patients (e.g., a hospital laboratory) is not considered to be a stool bank under this guidance.”

Sachs co-authored her article with Carolyn Edelstein, director of policy and global partnerships at OpenBiome, a nonprofit stool bank that sells FMT capsules (recommended dose of 30 capsules plus a safety test capsule costs $535, or stool preparations for delivery by colonoscopy, enema, and EGD/naso-enteric tube are $385 each) after conducting first-in-human evaluations (N=4) and a randomized dose-finding study (N=17).

Edelstein told Focus that the draft “suggests that the FDA is seeking to set up a more tailored regulatory scheme, one that considers stool banking separately from small-scale directed donation. We are in favor of seeing stool banking receive more regulatory oversight. We plan to answer the agency’s request for comments on the elements of a regulatory framework that would lend this oversight to the practice of stool banking without unduly burdening the physicians and healthcare facilities using banked material, and by extension, unduly limiting access to the treatment for their patients.”

FDA also explains that there were “difficulties in interpretation” with previous draft guidance, particularly around the provision that the donor be known either to the patient or to the treating licensed health care provider, noting “the revised approach more accurately reflects our intent to mitigate risk, based on the number of patients exposed to a particular donor or manufacturing practice rather than the risk inherent from any one donor.”

But as new FMTs are likely to hit the market as orphan drugs, the bigger issue at play could be associated with cost. Sachs noted that any FDA-approved treatment, particularly since it’s an orphan product, could be expensive (upwards of thousands of dollars for treatment).

 

Source:

http://www.raps.org/Regulatory-Focus/News/2016/02/29/24428/Fecal-Transplants-to-Treat-C-difficile-FDA-Seeks-Comment-on-What-IND-Requirements-to-Waive/