Tag Archives: Learn more about C. diff. Clinical Trials

Immuron Announced First Patients Enrolled In Phase 1/2 (first-in-human) Clinical Trials For Immuron’s IMM-529 For Treatment of C.difficile Infections

The Australian biopharmaceutical company Immuron announced that the first patients have enrolled in phase 1/2 (first-in-human) clinical trials for Immuron’s IMM-529, an oral immunotherapeutic medication for treatment of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI).

As published in MD Mag February 16, 2018

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According to Dan Peres, MD, senior vice president and head of medical development at Immuron, IMM-529 “has shown promise in successfully treating Clostridium-difficile” through its “unique delivery of antibodies.”

If the trials are successful, IMM-529 may be a powerful new weapon in the global fight against CDI. Peres reports that IMM-529 that has been effective in preclinical studies for prophylactic use, treatment of disease, and the prevention of recurrence in relation to CDI, and that the company is excited to enroll the first patients.

The placebo-controlled study to test the safety, tolerability and efficacy of IMM-529 will take place at Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem and include 60 CDI diagnosed patients in the 28 day study.

Patients enrolled in the study, led by Yoseph Caraco, MD, head of the clinical pharmacology unit at Hadassah Medical Center, will receive IMM-529 or a placebo 3 times a day during the 28 -day trial period, and be monitored for 2 additional months, determining any recurrence of the disease.

In a statement, Caraco said that he was optimistic about IMM-529 based on pre-clinical trial results and that IMM-529 could “be the answer we’re all looking for” when it comes to treatment of CDI.

IMM-529 targets CDI in 2 ways: by neutralizing toxin B (TcdB), a cytotoxin responsible for inflammation and diarrhea that characterizes CDI, and by binding Clostridium difficile spores and vegetative cells preventing further colonization. Caraco reported that IMM-529 approaches CDI by “targeting the main virulence factors of the disease with only minor disturbance to the natural biome” which could be extremely valuable in treating CDI.

In the earlier pre-clinical proof-of-concept study by led by Dena Lyras, MD, PhD with Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, IMM-529 was shown to be 80% effective in both the treatment of and prevention of CDI without the use of antibiotics.

In a December 2015 statement from Immuron, Lyras stated that she was “excited by the potential of these therapeutics in treating patients with both the acute and the relapse phase, of the disease.”

According to data supplied by the American Gastroenterological Association, approximately 500,000 people in the US are diagnosed with CDI each year, and CDI-associated deaths range from 14,000 to 30,000 per year.

In the European Union, according to a 2016 study led by Alessandro Cassini, MD, with the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control in Stockholm, Sweden, more than 150,000 cases of hospital-acquired CDI infections (134,053–173,089; 95% CI) occur each year.

According to Immuron, the cost of CDI globally (calculated by CIDRAP, the Center for Infectious Disease and Policy at the University of Minnesota) is an estimated annual economic burden of more than $10 billion and increases in hypervirulent and antibiotic-resistant strains have led to CDI becoming a major medical concern.

Caraco stated that CDI poses “a growing risk amongst a greater population of patients, including those recently treated with antibiotics, the elderly, institutionalized and hospitalized.”

If IMM-529 is found to be safe and effective in clinical trials, it could prove a significant boon to the global fight against CDI at all 3 stages of the disease.

Da Volterra Shared Results From Phase I Clinical Trial of DAV132 to Prevent Gut Microbiome Disruption Caused by Antibiotics and Prevent C. diff. Infections

DAV132 is a first-in-class product to protect the microbiome during antibiotic treatments and prevent Clostridium difficile infections.

French biotech Da Volterra is developing products to fight the rapidly rising rates of antibiotic resistance. During a Phase I study, the company’s medical device, DAV132, was used with the antibiotic, moxifloxacin, and successfully protected the intestinal microbiota from antibiotic residues. Overall, the product managed to reduce exposure of the microbiota to the antibiotic by 99% and maintain 97.8% of the microbiome’s genetic richness without affecting the drugs therapeutic efficacy.

In a randomized, controlled clinical trial performed in 44 healthy human volunteers, DAV132 was used in association with moxifloxacin, a widely used fluoroquinolone antibiotic. It was demonstrated that DAV132 is able to effectively capture residual antibiotics in the colon and reduce their concentration to very low levels. DAV132 reduced exposure of the intestinal microbiota to moxifloxacin by 99%. Meanwhile the plasma concentration of the antibiotic was essentially unaffected by the co-administration DAV132, meaning that its therapeutic efficacy will be maintained.

The ability of DAV132 to protect the intestinal microbiome was explored by identifying changes in bacterial gene richness as well as a detailed statistical analysis of the evolution of bacterial species throughout the study. In volunteers who received moxifloxacin alone, gene richness was drastically diminished to 54.6% of baseline after antibiotic treatment and failed to return to baseline even one month after treatment; 39% of bacterial species identified in the intestinal microbiota were affected. The co-administration of DAV132 with moxifloxacin largely protected the intestinal microbiome from disruption (97.8% of baseline for bacterial gene richness, and 93% of bacterial species protected).

The primary endpoints for the study were fully achieved and DAV132 showed an excellent tolerability profile.

Annie Ducher MD, Chief Medical Officer of Da Volterra, declared: “This clinical study is indicative of the potential of DAV132 to become one of the first preventative solutions to protect the intestinal microbiome and further avoid the detrimental consequences of antibiotic treatments, such as Clostridium difficile infections, for patients. We look forward to advancing the development of DAV132 in a pivotal patient study in 2018.”

Jean de Gunzburg PhD, Chief Scientific Officer of Da Volterra, added: “This study constitutes the first scientific demonstration of the protection of the intestinal microbiome from dysbiosis caused by a fluoroquinolone antibiotic treatment; our data suggests that this effect should be extendable to many different antibiotics from several therapeutic classes. The metagenomics analysis is outstanding and thoroughly convincing that DAV132 is highly effective at protecting the commensal bacteria in the intestines.”

The results are available under the reference: Gunzburg et al. Protection of the human gut microbiome from antibiotics. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, jix604, https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jix604.

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About DAV132:
With a novel and unique mechanism of action, DAV132 is a product candidate aiming to protect the intestinal microbiome from the side effects of antibiotics, hence preventing the onset of C. difficile infections. DAV132 is an adsorbent with a proprietary coating with colon targeted delivery. DAV132 has been tested in four Phase 1 clinical studies with no adverse safety events. DAV132 is currently entering a Phase 2 clinical trial.

About Da Volterra:
Da Volterra is a biopharmaceutical company based in France that develops new strategies aimed at protecting the intestinal microbiome from the deleterious effects of antibiotics, and preventing multi-resistant and life-threatening infections. Da Volterra’s innovative approaches promise a substantial medical progress to combat deadly pathogens. http://www.davolterra.com

(January 2018)

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Learn More About Clostridium difficile (C.diff., C.difficile) infection and Recurrent CDI Clinical Trials In Progress

 

 

 

The C Diff Foundation has implemented a global campaign to raise awareness of Clostridium difficile infection (C.difficile) clinical trials, clinical studies, clinical research and observational studies evaluating interventions for C. difficile prevention, treatments, and environmental safety.

In the USA: Nearly half a million Americans suffer from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released in 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of C. difficile. Of those, about 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly attributable to C. difficile infections making C. difficile a very important cause of infectious disease death in the United States.

“Clostridium difficile infections are not only the most common cause of healthcare-acquired infections in the United States but also very common in the community in younger patients who previously were thought to be less susceptible to C. difficile. The rate of recurrent C. difficile infections is increasing tremendously and this increase is higher than the rate of primary C. difficile infections,” stated Sahil Khanna, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Director of the C. difficile Clinic, Fecal Microbiota Transplantation program and C. difficile related Clinical Trials, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Dr. Khanna also added, “It is imperative and important for clinical trials to be done to advance the development of new treatments, new medications, and new ways to prevent and treat Clostridium difficile infections.”

Individuals volunteer to participate in clinical trials in hopes of improving their own health, to access treatments that might not be available otherwise, often because they are new and not yet widely available. They help others by contributing to advances in medicine. There can also be potential risks participating in clinical trials and clinical studies. All of the known risks associated with a particular trial and or study will be discussed during the informed consent process. It will be thoroughly explained in the informed consent document that a volunteer will receive from the research staff prior to participating in any study.

To learn more about clinical research (e.g., Clostridium difficile, C.difficile) visit the U.S. Food and Drug Administration http://www.fda.gov or telephone 1-800-835-4709, The National Institutes of Health (NIH) http://www.nih.gov and ClinicalTrials.gov.

“Clinical trials are vital to improving our knowledge about how best to prevent and treat C. difficile infections. Informing patients of clinical trials is important, and in recent years several clinical trials have led to significant improvements in the treatments available for patients with C. difficile infections,” stated Mark Wilcox, MD, FRCPath, Consultant Microbiologist, Head of Microbiology and Academic Lead of Pathology Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Professor of Medical Microbiology University of Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Lead on Clostridium difficile for Public Health England, UK.

About the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA):
The FDA is responsible for protecting the public health by assuring that foods are safe, wholesome, sanitary and properly labeled; ensuring that human and veterinary drug, and vaccines and other biological products and medical devices intended for human use are safe and effective. FDA’s responsibilities extend to the 50 United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and other U.S. territories and possessions.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH):
The National Institutes of Health (NIH), a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is the nation’s medical research agency making important discoveries that improve health and save lives.

About ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov is a Web-based resource that provides patients, their family members, health care professionals, researchers, and the public with easy access to information on publicly and privately supported clinical studies on a wide range of diseases and conditions.