Tag Archives: infection prevention

Infectious Disease Research Finds the Laundering of Removable Bed Barriers More Effective at Reducing Hospital-Acquired Infections Keeping Patients Safe

Infectious disease research highlights that laundering removable bed barriers is more effective at reducing hospital-acquired infections and keeping patients safe

A new peer-reviewed study published today in Sage Journals’ Infectious Disease Research and Treatment publication, found that cleaning and disinfecting mattresses by using removable, launderable bed barriers is more effective at eliminating bacteria that cause C. diff, MRSA, and E.coli than manual processes using chemical disinfectants. These findings indicate a new, much-needed industry best practice that hospitals must adopt to keep patients safe – especially in today’s COVID-19 reality as more patients begin to re-enter hospitals and resume elective procedures.

Most hospitals currently conduct a manual one-step process of cleaning hospital beds and mattresses, despite being off-label use of the disinfectant and the manufacturer’s multi-step instructions for cleaning and disinfection. Studies have also shown that mattresses, which are difficult to disinfect, contribute to the high rates of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) in the United States. These concerns prompted ECRI to cite mattress contamination as one of its top health hazards in both 2018 and 2019.

“We evaluated the effectiveness of the commercial laundry process under extreme test conditions, using high concentrations of soilage, blood, and urine. Laundering the removable bed barriers eliminated every major organism that contributes to HAIs—when the fabric was tested both at the beginning and end of life of the barrier,” said Edmond Hooker, MD, DrPH, an epidemiologist and practicing physician who co-authored the study, “The findings are both significant and timely as hospitals grapple with growing concerns about patient safety and how to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and other diseases. The time is now to take action and protect patients with this evidenced-based approach to cleaning and disinfecting.”

The commercial laundry process detailed in the study provides detergent, bleach, agitation, and repeatability. These elements allow bacteria and spores to be physically separated from the barrier surface. The chlorine works to kill residual organisms. Multiple rinse cycles allow the microorganisms to be removed from the washing machine.

“The current state of cleaning and disinfecting beds and mattresses is dangerous because it can leave residual bacteria that can be transmitted from patient to patient. However, laundering removable bed barriers provides an alternative. It eliminates issues with insufficient removal of pathogens from the patient surface, ” said Ardis Hoven, MD, Professor of Medicine at the University of Kentucky and an Infectious Disease consultant to the Kentucky Department for Public Health. “Unlike the commonly used manual process, it exceeded FDA guidance on this type of device. Hospital administrators must translate this new knowledge into action to protect the patients and families they serve.”

Trinity Guardion, the maker of the Soteria Bed Barrier – a removable and launderable bed barrier – sponsored the study. Dr. Hooker is a professor at Xavier University’s Department of Healthcare Administration and associate professor at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. To view the full study results, please visit the publication website.

 

To read the publication in its entirety please visit

www.trinityguardion.com

 

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Teena Chopra, MD, MPH – Clinician Educator

We are pleased to welcome Teena Chopra, MD, MPH, Clinician Educator as a Member of the C Diff Foundation, Co.-Director of the Junior Infection Fighter Program – Infection Prevention Education.

Dr. Chopra is a Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases, at Wayne State University and the Corporate Medical Director of Hospital Epidemiology, Infection Prevention and Antibiotic Stewardship at Detroit Medical Center, Wayne State University. Her research interests include Epidemiology of Healthcare-associated Infections, Infection Prevention Antibiotic Stewardship and Immunization.

Dr. Chopra has published over 70 papers in various journals and book chapters. Additionally she has independently reviewed over 50 journal articles, and  has a special interest in studying the epidemiology of infections, including Clostridium difficile and Multi-Drug Resistant Organisms.

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Maureen Spencer, RN, M.Ed, CIC

We are pleased to welcome Maureen Spencer as a Member of the C Diff Foundation, Co.-Director of the Junior Infection Fighter Program – Infection Prevention Education.

Maureen Spencer, RN, M.Ed. has been an Infection Preventionist for over 40 years and is certified in infection control (CIC). As one of the early pioneers in infection control, she was awarded the APIC National Carole DeMille Award in 1990 and was selected as one of the APIC Heroes of Infection Prevention in 2007. In 2012 she was selected as one of the “Who’s Who of Infection Prevention” and in 2017 was recognized as a Fellow of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (FAPIC) for her advanced practice in infection prevention and leader within the field. She is currently an independent Infection Preventionist Consultant from Boston, MA and offers consulting and lecture presentations.Maureen has published numerous peer-reviewed publications and has presented many abstracts/posters at national conference. She is a national and international speaker on an array of infection prevention and control topics. Her previous positions included Director, Clinical Education at Accelerate Diagnostics, Tucson, AZ; Corporate Director, Infection Prevention for Universal Health Services, King of Prussia, PA; Infection Control Manager at New England Baptist Hospital (an Orthopedic Center of Excellence in Boston) and Director of the Infection Control Unit at Mass General Hospital, Boston, MA.

C Diff Foundation’s Junior Infection Fighters Program Takes Action against Harmful Germs One Community at a Time Worldwide

C Diff Foundation Junior Infection Fighter Program was introduced to families and their children/teens in Chester County, Pennsylvania on October 12, 2019.

Dayle Skelly, Director of the Junior Infection Fighter Program and C. diff. A survivor said, “There shouldn’t be an age limit for raising awareness of infection prevention. Children are our future and take forth the torch of knowledge to be shared with everyone in each community.”

The volunteer program has been developed for children/teens, ages 7 to 14, with the participation and support of their parents/legal guardian and supervision of C Diff Foundation adult volunteers.

C Diff Foundation’s Junior Infection Fighters Program mission:

“To educate and advocate for infection prevention with the children and teens and to inspire their social, academic, personal, and health care knowledge.  To partner with parents, sharing the same mission, to prepare the Junior Infection Fighter Volunteers to be members of ever-changing global health care in societies worldwide.”

C Diff Foundation’s Junior Infection Fighter guidelines have been brought to fruition, under the direction of a leading infection preventionist, Maureen Spencer, RN, M.Ed., CIC.

Ms. Spencer who has been an Infection Preventionist for over 30 years and board certified in infection control (CIC). As one of the early pioneers in infection control, she was awarded the APIC National Carole DeMille Award in 1990 and was selected as one of the APIC Heroes of Infection Prevention in 2007 for her work in establishing a MRSA and Staph aureus Elimination Program at New England Baptist Hospital, an Orthopedic Center of Excellence in Boston. The groundbreaking work was published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery

All volunteer attendees enjoyed spending time learning more about practicing healthy habits combined with infection prevention information during the inaugural community event.

“We work together to carve new paths in the multi-faceted patient and family programs offered by
C Diff Foundation. Together we build awareness and advocate for a leading healthcare-acquired
infection; C. difficile.  Globally educating and advocating for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, clinical trials, antibiotic-resistance, and environmental safety. We are truly grateful to the dedicated members taking the C Diff Foundation’s mission to greater levels changing lives, and saving lives across the globe,” said Nancy C. Caralla, Founding President, C Diff Foundation.

Interested in joining the Junior Infection Fighters Program?

Contact the C Diff Foundation Main Office:  (727) 205-3922  or email

info@cdifffoundation.org

We look forward to hearing from you!

Study Finds C.diff. Infections Could Be Reduced by 13% In Hospital Transfers

“We defined a patient transfer as a patient discharged from one hospital and then admitted to another hospital on the same day.”

The study findings reinforce that infection prevention and control strategies should be conducted at the regional level to better minimize the spread of HAIs, Sewell and colleagues said.

Study findings showed that hospital transfers cause a “minority but substantial burden” of Clostridioides difficile infections in California and that the burden could be reduced by 13% statewide if contamination from hospital transfers was eliminated.

Hospital transfers are known to be associated with the spread of pathogens like C. difficile and MRSA, but researchers said it is critical to better understand the role that hospital transfers play in the spread of hospital-acquired infections, or HAIs.

“The relationship between hospital transfers and higher levels of HAIs is unclear, as is the public health significance of this relationship,” Daniel K. Sewell, PhD, assistant professor of biostatistics in the University of Iowa College of Public Health, and colleagues wrote.

They conducted a retrospective observational study using data collected between 2005 and 2011 from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project California State Inpatient Database.

“We were able to discern transfers between hospitals by considering patients who had common discharge and admission dates involving two distinct hospitals,” Sewell and colleagues wrote. “We defined a patient transfer as a patient discharged from one hospital and then admitted to another hospital on the same day.”

According to the study, Sewell and colleagues identified 26,878,498 admissions and 532,925 patient transfers across 385 hospitals. They found that 13% of C. difficile infections (CDIs) were a result of patient transfers (95% CI, 7.6%-18%). Additionally, the researchers observed CDI cases increase at receiving hospitals when the number of transfer patients increased or when the CDI rate at the transferring hospital increased, or both.

“Transfers of patients demonstrate the interconnectedness of health care systems,” they wrote. “Accordingly, efforts to control the spread of infections at one facility may benefit others, and the less rigorous infection control efforts at some hospitals may impact the infection rates at other hospitals within a transfer network.” – by Marley Ghizzone

 

 

 

 

To review article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

 

https://www.healio.com/infectious-disease/nosocomial-infections/news/online/%7B7bc8ae6c-fcc3-4ca6-a625-29301eb6535a%7D/eliminating-contamination-from-hospital-transfers-could-reduce-cdi-cases-by-13