Tag Archives: infection prevention

Who Are Infection Preventionists and Learn Why These Healthcare Professionals Are So Important

October 18th – 24th We Celebrate Infection Preventionists Worldwide.

Who Are Infection Preventionists?

Infection Preventionists (IPs) keep patients and healthcare workers safe from healthcare-associated infections (HAIs).

Take a minute to view the following video to help understand how IPs help improve patient care and safety, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

THANK YOU IP’S ~ We Salute Your Efforts And Dedication!

 

Infection Preventionists Save Lives

 

For Additional Information please visit the APIC website

www.apic.org

Electrostaqtic Sprayers for Disinfecting

Using established technologies in innovative ways can help long-term care facilities navigate the “new normal” of clean needed to meet pandemic and post-pandemic standards.

Electrostatic sprayers can help facilities disinfect large areas in far less time than would be required when using manual trigger spray and wiping methods. This is particularly important in long-term care facilities, where residents live in close quarters, share common areas, and use shared mobile equipment such as wheelchairs.

The most important considerations when choosing an electrostatic sprayer are sprayer design, system safety, ease of use, and proof of performance. Pair the electrostatic sprayer with Environmental Protection Agency-registered disinfectants and sanitizers that also have language on the master label listing electrostatic spraying as an approved application method. For use against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, choose disinfectants on the  EPA’s List N. For use against Clostridium difficile, choose disinfectants on the EPA’s List K.

Sprayer Design 

The two basic types of electrostatic sprayers that exist today are A/C powered sprayers (i.e., sprayers that plug into an outlet) and battery-powered sprayers. A/C power provides consistent, reliable droplet charge that results in consistent, reliable product performance. The power in batteries can fluctuate and diminish during spraying, resulting in reduced surface coverage and unreliable performance. Delivering disinfectant to all surfaces of intended targets is particularly important when treating complex objects like wheelchairs that can be difficult to clean manually.

System safety

Specific disinfectants should be assessed with specific sprayers to determine personal protective equipment requirements for the operator and to make sure there is no re-entry time for bystanders. Also, consider whether solutions are ready-to-use or if they require dilution prior to use. Dilutable products can be less expensive than ready-to-use products, but they add extra time and labor into the application process and increase the potential for human error, which in turn could pose an increased safety risk if mixed or used improperly.

Ease of use

Whichever device and disinfectant combination you choose, ensure the manufacturer can provide training for your personnel. They should also be able to provide the SDS for each disinfectant recommended for use with the sprayer, including information on the appropriate PPE to wear during use. Devices should be ergonomically designed so that operators can use them comfortably throughout the course of their shift.

System performance

It’s important to consider whether an electrostatic sprayer delivers everything it claims. Both manufacturer testing and real-world testing are important factors that can demonstrate a system’s performance. Manufacturer testing could include efficacy testing in a laboratory, surface compatibility testing, object wrap demonstration, and surface coverage rates. Real-world testing could include cost-benefit analysis, efficacy confirmation, compatibility with surfaces in a facility, and impact on outcomes like patient infection rates, as suggested by an evaluation of rapid decontamination of portable equipment and open areas published in the American Journal of Infection Control earlier this year.

Electrostatic spray technology is more than a device — it’s a system. Before purchasing an electrostatic sprayer, consider whether the technology you are investing in is safe, trusted, and proven. A technology that performs as intended can help long-term care facilities demonstrate a commitment to providing a safe environment for both residents and staff.

 

To view the article in its entirety please click on the link below to be redirected:

https://www.mcknights.com/marketplace/electrostatic-sprayers-hit-the-spot-for-surface-disinfection-in-long-term-care/

Infectious Disease Research Finds the Laundering of Removable Bed Barriers More Effective at Reducing Hospital-Acquired Infections Keeping Patients Safe

Infectious disease research highlights that laundering removable bed barriers is more effective at reducing hospital-acquired infections and keeping patients safe

A new peer-reviewed study published today in Sage Journals’ Infectious Disease Research and Treatment publication, found that cleaning and disinfecting mattresses by using removable, launderable bed barriers is more effective at eliminating bacteria that cause C. diff, MRSA, and E.coli than manual processes using chemical disinfectants. These findings indicate a new, much-needed industry best practice that hospitals must adopt to keep patients safe – especially in today’s COVID-19 reality as more patients begin to re-enter hospitals and resume elective procedures.

Most hospitals currently conduct a manual one-step process of cleaning hospital beds and mattresses, despite being off-label use of the disinfectant and the manufacturer’s multi-step instructions for cleaning and disinfection. Studies have also shown that mattresses, which are difficult to disinfect, contribute to the high rates of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) in the United States. These concerns prompted ECRI to cite mattress contamination as one of its top health hazards in both 2018 and 2019.

“We evaluated the effectiveness of the commercial laundry process under extreme test conditions, using high concentrations of soilage, blood, and urine. Laundering the removable bed barriers eliminated every major organism that contributes to HAIs—when the fabric was tested both at the beginning and end of life of the barrier,” said Edmond Hooker, MD, DrPH, an epidemiologist and practicing physician who co-authored the study, “The findings are both significant and timely as hospitals grapple with growing concerns about patient safety and how to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and other diseases. The time is now to take action and protect patients with this evidenced-based approach to cleaning and disinfecting.”

The commercial laundry process detailed in the study provides detergent, bleach, agitation, and repeatability. These elements allow bacteria and spores to be physically separated from the barrier surface. The chlorine works to kill residual organisms. Multiple rinse cycles allow the microorganisms to be removed from the washing machine.

“The current state of cleaning and disinfecting beds and mattresses is dangerous because it can leave residual bacteria that can be transmitted from patient to patient. However, laundering removable bed barriers provides an alternative. It eliminates issues with insufficient removal of pathogens from the patient surface, ” said Ardis Hoven, MD, Professor of Medicine at the University of Kentucky and an Infectious Disease consultant to the Kentucky Department for Public Health. “Unlike the commonly used manual process, it exceeded FDA guidance on this type of device. Hospital administrators must translate this new knowledge into action to protect the patients and families they serve.”

Trinity Guardion, the maker of the Soteria Bed Barrier – a removable and launderable bed barrier – sponsored the study. Dr. Hooker is a professor at Xavier University’s Department of Healthcare Administration and associate professor at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. To view the full study results, please visit the publication website.

 

To read the publication in its entirety please visit

www.trinityguardion.com

 

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Teena Chopra, MD, MPH – Clinician Educator

We are pleased to welcome Teena Chopra, MD, MPH, Clinician Educator as a Member of the C Diff Foundation, Co.-Director of the Junior Infection Fighter Program – Infection Prevention Education.

Dr. Chopra is a Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases, at Wayne State University and the Corporate Medical Director of Hospital Epidemiology, Infection Prevention and Antibiotic Stewardship at Detroit Medical Center, Wayne State University. Her research interests include Epidemiology of Healthcare-associated Infections, Infection Prevention Antibiotic Stewardship and Immunization.

Dr. Chopra has published over 70 papers in various journals and book chapters. Additionally she has independently reviewed over 50 journal articles, and  has a special interest in studying the epidemiology of infections, including Clostridium difficile and Multi-Drug Resistant Organisms.

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Maureen Spencer, RN, M.Ed, CIC

We are pleased to welcome Maureen Spencer as a Member of the C Diff Foundation, Co.-Director of the Junior Infection Fighter Program – Infection Prevention Education.

Maureen Spencer, RN, M.Ed. has been an Infection Preventionist for over 40 years and is certified in infection control (CIC). As one of the early pioneers in infection control, she was awarded the APIC National Carole DeMille Award in 1990 and was selected as one of the APIC Heroes of Infection Prevention in 2007. In 2012 she was selected as one of the “Who’s Who of Infection Prevention” and in 2017 was recognized as a Fellow of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (FAPIC) for her advanced practice in infection prevention and leader within the field. She is currently an independent Infection Preventionist Consultant from Boston, MA and offers consulting and lecture presentations.Maureen has published numerous peer-reviewed publications and has presented many abstracts/posters at national conference. She is a national and international speaker on an array of infection prevention and control topics. Her previous positions included Director, Clinical Education at Accelerate Diagnostics, Tucson, AZ; Corporate Director, Infection Prevention for Universal Health Services, King of Prussia, PA; Infection Control Manager at New England Baptist Hospital (an Orthopedic Center of Excellence in Boston) and Director of the Infection Control Unit at Mass General Hospital, Boston, MA.