Tag Archives: infection prevention

Researchers Find Inpatients Were Most Likely to Acquire a C.diff. Infection When Census Was Between 25-75% Capacity

In a study of more than 550,000 patient discharges from 327 California hospitals, researchers found that patients were most likely to contract Clostridium difficile (C.diff., CDI, C.difficile) —a stubborn and potentially deadly hospital-associated infection (HAI) —when inpatient wards were in the “middle range” of capacity, or between 25% and 75% full.

“Our hypothesis going in was essentially that when hospitals are busier, perhaps care quality is compromised,” Mahshid Abir, M.D., assistant professor of emergency medicine at UM Medical School and the study’s lead author, told FierceHealthcare. “Certainly when we saw these findings, we were surprised.”

Overall, more than 2,000 patients included in the study, which looked at discharges between 2008 and 2012, contracted C. diff during their hospital stay. Hospitals often struggle to control C. diff infections, and a significant number of readmissions can be linked to such infections.

By basing the study around a model that accounts for seasonal staffing changes or unit closure, for example, researchers were better able to filter out infections that a patient had before arriving at the hospital, she said. Calculating occupancy in this way could also help providers identify potential risk factor for infection, according to the study.

Patients admitted to a unit that was at between 25% and 75% capacity were three times more likely to contract C. diff compared to those in units at below 25% or above 75% capacity, according to the study.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/hospitals-health-systems/study-explores-link-between-hospital-occupancy-infection-rates

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) Releases New Guidance for Infectious Disease Outbreak Preparedness in Hospitals

 

 

New Document Guides Hospitals in Responding to Infectious Disease Outbreaks

Healthcare epidemiologists play key role in emergency preparedness and response

New expert guidance document for hospitals to use in preparing for and containing outbreaks was published today by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, with the support of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The guide was published in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

“This guidance details the role of the healthcare epidemiologist as an expert and leader supporting hospitals in preparing for, stopping, and recovering from infectious diseases crises,” said David Banach, MD, co-chair of the writing panel and Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Connecticut and Hospital Epidemiologist at UConn Health. “Armed with the resources to develop and support key activities, healthcare epidemiologists can utilize their skills and expertise in investigation and response to infectious disease outbreaks within a hospital’s incident command system.”

SHEA and CDC collaborated in 2016 to form the Outbreak Response Training Program to guide healthcare epidemiologists in how to maximize their facilities’ preparedness and response efforts to combat outbreaks such as Ebola, Zika, pandemic influenza, and other infectious diseases. The new document, Outbreak Response and Incident Management: SHEA Guidance and Resources for Healthcare Epidemiologists in United States Acute-Care Hospitals, leads epidemiologists through how to apply, use, and interact with emergency response structures, groups, and frameworks from the institutional to the federal levels, and provides an overview of essential resources. The principles in the guidance are intended for acute care hospitals, but may apply to other types of healthcare facilities, such as free-standing emergency departments and long-term care facilities.

According to the guidance document, during a crisis the epidemiologist provides medical and technical expertise and leads infection prevention and control efforts, coordinates with institutional stakeholders, and provides input into internal and external communications.

“We will always be faced with new and re-emerging pathogens,” said Lynn Johnston, MD, co-chair of the writing panel and professor of medicine and infectious diseases at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. “This guidance is part of an ongoing effort to develop tools and strategies to prevent and manage contagious diseases to ensure patient and public safety.”

The document is part of a partnership between SHEA and CDC to prepare for emerging and re-emerging infections by providing training, educational resources, and expert guidance for dealing with outbreaks in healthcare facilities. The program is designed to train U.S. healthcare epidemiologists, who oversee infection control programs, to have the skills, abilities, and tools available to implement infection control practices and provide a leadership voice in responding to infectious threats.

To operationalize the guidance, SHEA will conduct an outbreak response workshop in January, develop and post toolkits based on the recommendations, and provide online training modules and webinars.

 

 

To view article in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://www.shea-online.org/index.php/journal-news/press-room/press-release-archives/555-w-document-guides-hospitals-in-responding-to-infectious-disease-outbreaks

 

Hand-Washing aka Hand Hygiene Patient Education Proves Successful To Reduce C.diff. Infections

HandHygiene #1 Prevention

Hand-Washing aka hand hygiene Remains #1 In Infection Prevention In Every Setting.

“Despite evidence to suggest that [hand hygiene] is important in preventing infection, hospitalized patients are often not provided the opportunity to clean their hands,” due to mobility and cognitive obstacles as well as lack of education, investigators wrote.

Education on patient hand hygiene significantly reduced the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Mercy Hospital.

First, they conducted baseline surveys to assess patient hand hygiene, which showed patients needed more opportunities to wash their hands. Then nurse educators provided staff with an educational presentation on the importance of patient hand hygiene for preventing infection, which included specific times they should encourage and assist patients with hand hygiene. Staff then provided education and assistance to newly admitted patients, and researchers conducted additional surveys after implementation of this intervention.

During the first phase of the study involving just four medical-surgical nursing units, patient hand hygiene education increased significantly after the intervention (P < .0001). Overall, 97 follow-up surveys showed the proportion of those who received hand hygiene education increased from 34% to 64%, the opportunities provided for hand hygiene increased from 60% to 86%, and the average number of times hand hygiene was performed daily increased from 2.7 to 3.75.

After expanding the intervention to the whole hospital in the second phase of the study, 189 follow-up surveys showed that patient hand hygiene education increased from 48% to 53%. Meanwhile, overall opportunities for hand hygiene remained unchanged from 68%, and daily frequency of patient hand hygiene did not change significantly (mean, 2.4 vs. 2.6 times per day).

Notably, CDI rates dropped significantly during the 6 months following hospital-wide implementation.

“[Standardized infection ratio] P values for Q2 and W3 (0.0157 and 0.0103, respectively) were significantly lower than expected (P .05),” investigators wrote. “The Q4 SIR, however, showed an increase to 0.3844 over the 2 preceding quarters.”

They concluded that these findings showed patient hand hygiene “should be considered a potential addition to CDI prevention measures in hospitalized patients.” – by Adam Leitenberger

Source:  https://www.healio.com/gastroenterology/infection/news/online/%7B0ea95c50-ddec-4259-a229-5979fde9d8af%7D/patient-handwashing-cuts-c-difficile-rate-in-hospital

Medical Mattresses; Healthcare-acquired Infections and How Hospital Bedding Is Involved

Our guests Dr. Edmond Hooker, MD with Bruce Rippe, CEO of Trinity Guardion and  J. Darrel Hicks, BA, Master REH, CHESP joined us on C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network live broadcast –August 1st  to  discuss Healthcare – associated Infections (HAIs ) and how they lead to more than 720,000 illnesses and 75,000 deaths a year. In fact, more people die from HAIs each year than from automobile accidents. Furthermore, HAIs are a huge financial burden, adding $30 billion to annual healthcare costs. The American-made Trinity Patient Protection System gives hospitals the solution they need to reduce and eliminate HAIs.

Launderable, reusable, cost-effective and eco-friendly, the Trinity System’s fluid-proof covers fit around beds, pillows, stretchers and physical therapy tables. Unlike typical disinfectant agents designed for hard surfaces, the Trinity System keeps bacteria off the porous surface of the mattress, as well as, the bed deck. When laundered to CDC standards, the Trinity System removes 99.99% of bacteria and has been proven to reduce C. diff infection rates by about 50%.

 

www.trinityguardion.com

 

To learn more, from these leading topic-experts, about Medical Mattress Contamination and how bedding is involved in healthcare-associated infections.

Listen to the podcast available and part of the C.diff. Spores and More living library.

https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/100501/healthcare-acquired-infections-and-how-hospital-bedding-is-involved

Bridging Collaboration Between Patients and Healthcare Providers to Reduce Hospital-Acquired Infections

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C. diff. Spores and More” Global Broadcasting Network
will host a special episode on their live radio program (cdiffradio.com)
airing on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 at 1:00 pm EST featuring world-renowned
infectious disease expert, Dr. Hudson Garrett Jr., Global Chief Clinical Officer for Pentax Medical-Hoya Corporation and Chairperson of the Clinical Education Committee
for the C Diff Foundation.

This special episode, Bridging Collaboration Between Patients and Healthcare Providers to Reduce Hospital-Acquired Infections (HAI’s),  will feature a robust discussion on the patient’s role in preventing healthcare associated infections, an overview of medical device hygiene and infection control, the importance of antibiotic stewardship, and applications of evidence-based infection control measures across the entire healthcare continuum of care.

“Healthcare continues to become more and more complex as the acuity and needs of the patient changes along with the correlating technologies. Patients and Healthcare Providers must work together to mitigate the risk for Healthcare Associated Infections and other adverse events,” says Dr. Garrett.

C. diff. Spores and More ™“ spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the
C. diff.
community and more.

Through the interviews, the C Diff Foundation’s mission connects, educates, and empowers listeners worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

 

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

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Clorox Healthcare, Sponsor of C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network

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Xavier University Researchers 2015 Study Demonstrated That By Using Launderable Mattress Barrier Cover Could Decrease the Number Of Patients Who Became Infected With C. difficile by 50%

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In 2010 Xavier University researcher
Dr. Edmond Hooker began research delving into a possible link between hospital beds and healthcare acquired infections (HAIs).

It immediately became apparent that hospital mattresses have been frequently linked to outbreaks of HAI;s. Hospital mattresses are soft porous surfaces.

They are designed to allow moisture to move away from the patient to prevent skin breakdown and bedsores. However, this design makes it impossible for the mattress surface to be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected using currently available cleaning products.

Dr. Hooker’s first line of scientific inquiry was to culture the surfaces of mattresses that had been “terminally” cleaned and were ready for the next patient. In 2011, the Xavier team showed that these mattresses were still contaminated with pathogenic bacteria despite having been cleaned.

Again in 2012, while investigating the use of a launderable mattress barrier cover,

Dr. Hooker showed that mattresses cleaned using traditional hospital methods were still contaminated with pathogenic bacteria.

Prior research demonstrated that patients who are placed in a bed where the previous patient had Clostridium difficile (C. diff) and/or other bacterial infections are at an increased risk of acquiring those infections.

In 2015, researchers from Xavier University published the results of a landmark study. It demonstrated that, by using the launderable mattress barrier cover in two long-term acute care hospitals (treating extremely ill patients), they could decrease the number of patients who became infected with C. diff by 50%, even when the beds of C. diff patients had been cleaned using bleach.

Another recent study, just published in JAMA, demonstrated that hospital beds are the vector for transmission of C. diff even from asymptomatic patients who had occupied the same bed and received antibiotics during their hospital stay.

It is clear that the hospital environment, especially the hospital bed, is a major vector in the transmission of C. diff and many other bacteria that cause HAIs.

Healthcare providers must find ways to ensure that hospital mattresses are cleaned and disinfected properly between patients, and that additional non-chemical measures are taken, if available, to protect patients.

Enjoy the following Video Clips For Additional Trinity Guardion News

 

*Please note – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse any products and/or clinical study in progress. All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only. Thank You.

C Diff Foundation Global Network Welcomes Ron Romano, RN

Welcome cloud

We are pleased to welcome Ron Romano, RN to the C Diff Foundation Global Network.

Ron Romano, RN  presides as Infection Prevention Advocate.

 

Ron has certifications from the following organizations :

      • American Association for LTC Nursing – Co-founder Past President – 2007- 2015
      • American Association for Safe Patient Handling – Board Member 2010-2012
      • Association for Professionals in Infection Control & Epidemiology – Current Member
      • Safety Specialist LTC – Certification – Current

C. difficile Infections are no stranger to Ron as his family members have also been touched by this infection.  His background in healthcare and passion for Infection Prevention and Epidemiology is an asset to many.  Ron is the Owner, President and CEO of Safety Net LLC in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Safety Net is a national healthcare safety consulting and distribution company providing unique product solutions to mitigate risk associated to infections. We serve acute care hospitals, post-acute and home-care. Our solutions protect our healthcare workers and those under their care.

Ron has also been the Past-President in the following organizations:

American Association for LTC Nursing (AALTCN) 07-15    The AALTCN is a professional organization that supports all levels of caregivers providing career ladder with supporting education, certifications and resources. AALTCN has recently merged with the American Association for Nurse Assessment Coordinators to form the largest professional nursing organization in long term care.

Health Education Network – 07-15,  Co-owner – President

Health Education Network is a medical publication company that provides Nursing education for all levels of caregivers on a variety of topics for LTC. Certificate programs are available for Staff Development Coordinators, Nurse Assessment Coordinators, Director of Nursing in LTC, RN and LPN in LTC.

National Association Director of Nursing Administration (NADONA/LTC) Cincinnati, Ohio 01-07

NADONA/LTC is a professional organization representing Directors of Nursing, Assistant Directors of Nursing and Clinical Managers in long-term care. NADONA/LTC has 38 state chapters nationally and internationally in Canada.

We welcome Ron to the C Diff Foundation and appreciate his healthcare background to join us in promoting Infection prevention and C. diff. Awareness worldwide with fellow members