Tag Archives: infection prevention

Researchers Conduct Study To Establish a Quantitative Correlation Between Applied Alcohol-Based Hand Rub ABHR Volume and Achieved Hand Coverage Utilizing an Innovate Quantitative Evaluation System

A large-scale investigation of alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR) volume: hand coverage correlations utilizing an innovative quantitative evaluation system

  • Constantinos Voniatis,
  • Száva Bánsághi,
  • Andrea Ferencz &
  • Tamás Haidegger

 

Abstract

Background

Current hand hygiene guidelines do not provide recommendations on a specific volume for the clinical hand rubbing procedure. According to recent studies volume should be adjusted in order to achieve complete coverage. However, hand size is a parameter that highly influences the hand coverage quality when using alcohol-based hand rubs (ABHR). The purpose of this study was to establish a quantitative correlation between applied ABHR volume and achieved hand coverage.

Method

ABHR based hand hygiene events were evaluated utilizing a digital health device, the Semmelweis hand hygiene system with respect to coverage achieved on the skin surface. Medical students and surgical residents (N = 356) were randomly selected and given predetermined ABHR volumes. Additionally, hand sizes were calculated using specialized software developed for this purpose. Drying time, ABHR volume awareness, as well spillage awareness were documented for each hand hygiene event.

Results

Hand coverage achieved during a hand hygiene event strongly depends on the applied ABHR volume. At a 1 ml dose, the uncovered hand area was approximately 7.10%, at 2 ml it decreased to 1.68%, and at 3 ml it further decreased to 1.02%. The achieved coverage is strongly correlated to hand size, nevertheless, a 3 ml applied volume proved sufficient for most hand hygiene events (84%). When applying a lower amount of ABHR (1.5 ml), even people with smaller hands failed to cover their entire hand surface. Furthermore, a 3 ml volume requires more than the guideline prescribed 20–30 s to dry. In addition, results suggest that drying time is not only affected by hand size but perhaps other factors may be involved as well (e.g., skin temperature and degree of hydration). ABHR volumes of 3.5 ml or more were inefficient, as the disinfectant spilled while the additional rubbing time did not improve hand coverage.

Conclusions

Hand sizes differ a lot among HCWs. After objectively measuring participants, the surface of the smallest hand was just over half compared to the largest hand (259 cm2 and 498 cm2, respectively). While a 3 ml ABHR volume is reasonable for medium-size hands, the need for an optimized volume of hand rub for each individual is critical, as it offers several advantages. Not only it can ensure adequate hand hygiene quality, but also prevent unnecessary costs. Bluntly increasing the volume also increases spillage and therefore waste of disinfectant in the case of smaller hands. In addition, adherence could potentially decrease due to the required longer drying time, therefore, adjusting the dosage according to hand size may also increase the overall hand hygiene compliance.

To read this Abstract in its entirety please click on the link below to be redirected. Thank you.

https://aricjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13756-021-00917-8/

Toothbrush Hygiene


Toothbrush hygiene:
A 2012 study from Manchester University in England found that a toothbrush may house more than 10 million bacteria. To keep your toothbrush as germ-free as possible, rinse and air-dry it after each use, and, if you choose to store it in the bathroom, use a toothbrush cover, and close the toilet lid before you flush. It is also recommended not to store the toothbrush directly next to the toilet.

 

 

C. diff. Spores and More Live Broadcast Enters Season VI

Welcome to Season VI on 

C. diff. Spores and More

Live Broadcast, sponsored

by Clorox Healthcare.

 

With over 260 archived episodes ~ Listen At Your Leisure


It’s a new year with an entirely new line up of guests eager to share their C. difficile research, infection prevention methods, clinical trials in progress, the updates in the C. diff. community, and much more.

 

 

 

 

In March the post-Patient and Family Symposium presentations will broadcast, in the event you weren’t able to attend the live-online event hosted on January 15th. The first annual Patient and Family Symposium was sponsored by Seres Therapeutics

Do you have a specific topic of interest or would like to learn more about a specific product or procedure?  Send an email to info@cdifffoundation.org and share your suggestions and interests.

“None of us can do this alone ~ All of us can do this together.”

Join us every Tuesday at 1:00 p.m. EST for the Live Broadcast  www.cdiffradio.com

 

Study Finds the Impact of COVID-19 Prevention Reduce Healthcare-Associated (HA) C. difficile Infections (CDI) Incidence

Impact of COVID-19 prevention measures on risk of health care-associated Clostridium difficile infection

Highlights

  • Many strategies to reduce microorganism spread were adopted during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • We have retrospectively analyzed the period of the pandemic and previous years.
  • Such strategies reduce healthcare-associated (HA)  C difficile infection (HA-CDI) incidence.
  • Maintaining these measures over time could reduce HA-CDI and related expenses.
  • •This study helps to understand effective hygiene interventions to prevent CDI.

Abstract

Clostridium difficile is the most common pathogen between healthcare-associated infections and its incidence has increased during the last years. lack of enough evidence about effective hygiene interventions to prevent this disease. Due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‑19) pandemic, several strategies to reduce microorganism spread were adopted in a hospital setting. The objective of this study was to establish whether such strategies can reduce healthcare-associated C difficile infection (HA-CDI) incidence. We found that during the pandemic (2020) HA-CDI incidence was significantly lower with respect to the previous years. This work demonstrates that maintaining this level of attention regarding control activities related to the prevention of microorganism transmission significantly reduces HA-CDI and related expenses in terms of health costs and human lives.
 

Background

Clostridium difficile (CD) is the most common pathogen among healthcare-associated (HA) infections.

,

An important obstacle in the prevention of C difficile infection (CDI) is the lack of enough evidence about effective hygiene interventions to prevent this disease. Although preventive contact precautions are recommended, there is no sufficient data on their effectiveness for its prevention.

,

Due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, several strategies to reduce microorganism spread were adopted in a hospital setting.

The objective of this study was to establish whether such strategies can reduce HA-CDI incidence. The primary task was to identify differences in HA-CDI incidence in medical wards before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. The secondary task was to evaluate if severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection could influence the incidence of CDI.

Methods

We conducted a retrospective analysis on medical wards’ discharges (n. 1617) in S. Andrea Hospital (Rome) from March 1 to June 30, 2020, comparing data before (2017, 2018, and 2019) and during (2020) the COVID-19 pandemic. Intensive care units and paediatric wards were excluded. CDI diagnosis was confirmed by clinical suspicious (presence of diarrhea defined as ≥3 unformed stools in 24 hours) plus stool tests positive for CD. HA-CDI incidence was depicted as CDI diagnosed ≥72 hours after admission per 100 total discharges. Data was collected using Excel Office, and χ² test was performed to detect differences in HA-CDI incidence between different groups. Value of P< .05 was considered significant.

Results

The number of discharges and HA-CDI diagnosis for each medical ward is reported in Table 1. No statistically significant difference of HA-CDI incidence between the years 2017, 2018, and 2019 was observed. Conversely, during the pandemic (2020) HA-CDI incidence was significantly lower with respect to 2017 (odds ratio [OR] = 2.98; P = .002), 2018 (OR = 2.27; P = .023) and 2019 (OR = 2.07; P = .047) (see Table 1 and Fig. 1). Interestingly, during 2020, COVID-19 departments showed higher HA-CDI incidence respect to Covid-19 free wards (not significative). This data suggests SARS-Cov2 infection as a possible risk factor for CDI in agreement with recent evidences that report altered gut microbiota in COVID-19 patients.

Furthers studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

 

.pdf file available at the top of the page

 

resource:  https://www.ajicjournal.org/article/S0196-6553(20)30891-9/fulltext

Who Are Infection Preventionists and Learn Why These Healthcare Professionals Are So Important

October 18th – 24th We Celebrate Infection Preventionists Worldwide.

Who Are Infection Preventionists?

Infection Preventionists (IPs) keep patients and healthcare workers safe from healthcare-associated infections (HAIs).

Take a minute to view the following video to help understand how IPs help improve patient care and safety, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

THANK YOU IP’S ~ We Salute Your Efforts And Dedication!

 

Infection Preventionists Save Lives

 

For Additional Information please visit the APIC website

www.apic.org