Tag Archives: infection prevention

C Diff Foundation’s Junior Infection Fighters Program Takes Action against Harmful Germs One Community at a Time Worldwide

C Diff Foundation Junior Infection Fighter Program was introduced to families and their children/teens in Chester County, Pennsylvania on October 12, 2019.

Dayle Skelly, Director of the Junior Infection Fighter Program and C. diff. A survivor said, “There shouldn’t be an age limit for raising awareness of infection prevention. Children are our future and take forth the torch of knowledge to be shared with everyone in each community.”

The volunteer program has been developed for children/teens, ages 7 to 14, with the participation and support of their parents/legal guardian and supervision of C Diff Foundation adult volunteers.

C Diff Foundation’s Junior Infection Fighters Program mission:

“To educate and advocate for infection prevention with the children and teens and to inspire their social, academic, personal, and health care knowledge.  To partner with parents, sharing the same mission, to prepare the Junior Infection Fighter Volunteers to be members of ever-changing global health care in societies worldwide.”

C Diff Foundation’s Junior Infection Fighter guidelines have been brought to fruition, under the direction of a leading infection preventionist, Maureen Spencer, RN, M.Ed., CIC.

Ms. Spencer who has been an Infection Preventionist for over 30 years and board certified in infection control (CIC). As one of the early pioneers in infection control, she was awarded the APIC National Carole DeMille Award in 1990 and was selected as one of the APIC Heroes of Infection Prevention in 2007 for her work in establishing a MRSA and Staph aureus Elimination Program at New England Baptist Hospital, an Orthopedic Center of Excellence in Boston. The groundbreaking work was published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery

All volunteer attendees enjoyed spending time learning more about practicing healthy habits combined with infection prevention information during the inaugural community event.

“We work together to carve new paths in the multi-faceted patient and family programs offered by
C Diff Foundation. Together we build awareness and advocate for a leading healthcare-acquired
infection; C. difficile.  Globally educating and advocating for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, clinical trials, antibiotic-resistance, and environmental safety. We are truly grateful to the dedicated members taking the C Diff Foundation’s mission to greater levels changing lives, and saving lives across the globe,” said Nancy C. Caralla, Founding President, C Diff Foundation.

Interested in joining the Junior Infection Fighters Program?

Contact the C Diff Foundation Main Office:  (727) 205-3922  or email

info@cdifffoundation.org

We look forward to hearing from you!

Study Finds C.diff. Infections Could Be Reduced by 13% In Hospital Transfers

“We defined a patient transfer as a patient discharged from one hospital and then admitted to another hospital on the same day.”

The study findings reinforce that infection prevention and control strategies should be conducted at the regional level to better minimize the spread of HAIs, Sewell and colleagues said.

Study findings showed that hospital transfers cause a “minority but substantial burden” of Clostridioides difficile infections in California and that the burden could be reduced by 13% statewide if contamination from hospital transfers was eliminated.

Hospital transfers are known to be associated with the spread of pathogens like C. difficile and MRSA, but researchers said it is critical to better understand the role that hospital transfers play in the spread of hospital-acquired infections, or HAIs.

“The relationship between hospital transfers and higher levels of HAIs is unclear, as is the public health significance of this relationship,” Daniel K. Sewell, PhD, assistant professor of biostatistics in the University of Iowa College of Public Health, and colleagues wrote.

They conducted a retrospective observational study using data collected between 2005 and 2011 from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project California State Inpatient Database.

“We were able to discern transfers between hospitals by considering patients who had common discharge and admission dates involving two distinct hospitals,” Sewell and colleagues wrote. “We defined a patient transfer as a patient discharged from one hospital and then admitted to another hospital on the same day.”

According to the study, Sewell and colleagues identified 26,878,498 admissions and 532,925 patient transfers across 385 hospitals. They found that 13% of C. difficile infections (CDIs) were a result of patient transfers (95% CI, 7.6%-18%). Additionally, the researchers observed CDI cases increase at receiving hospitals when the number of transfer patients increased or when the CDI rate at the transferring hospital increased, or both.

“Transfers of patients demonstrate the interconnectedness of health care systems,” they wrote. “Accordingly, efforts to control the spread of infections at one facility may benefit others, and the less rigorous infection control efforts at some hospitals may impact the infection rates at other hospitals within a transfer network.” – by Marley Ghizzone

 

 

 

 

To review article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

 

https://www.healio.com/infectious-disease/nosocomial-infections/news/online/%7B7bc8ae6c-fcc3-4ca6-a625-29301eb6535a%7D/eliminating-contamination-from-hospital-transfers-could-reduce-cdi-cases-by-13

Path03Gen Is Taking a Step In the Right Direction to Reduce Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI’s)

Amazing research and developments are taking place all across the globe.

In St. Petersburg, Florida there is an organization dedicated in fighting  harmful pathogens and the St. Pete Catalyst’s Journalist Margie Manning had the following to report on the “Green Earth Medical Solutions” technology company:

Green Earth Medical Solutions developed technology that kills germs on the bottom of shoes, which often are overlooked as a source for bacteria, virus and other disease-causing microorganisms.

The company’s PathO3Gen sanitizing stations combine UVC, a type of ultraviolet light, and ozone, to sanitize shoes. Anyone entering a healthcare facility or a critical care area steps on the station and waits for about six seconds. When they step off, 99.9 percent of the deadly pathogens have been eliminated, said chief operating officer Scott Beal.

Healthcare acquired infections, or HAIs, cause about 100,000 deaths every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There’s been a lot of attention paid to infection control in healthcare, most of it focused on hand washing and cleaning high-touch surfaces. A 2017 clinical study showed 77 percent of the soles of shoes walking into a hospital contained superbugs such as MRSA and C. difficile, or a combination of the two.

“Initially, clinicians said ‘we don’t operate on the floors, those are not areas of concern,’” Beal said. “But the infection control community and stakeholders have been coming out with more and more published credible studies that say what is tracked in on the floor is getting airborne and aerosolized, and makes it to high-touch areas, which then cause HAIs.”

Reducing pathogens tracked in by shoes also increases the efficacy of other sanitizing methods, because the building is not being overrun by germs, Beal said.

Hospitals have financial reasons to reduce hospital-acquired infections. Beginning in 2015, federal reimbursements to hospitals were directly affected by their HAI rates.

AdventHealth Connerton, an acute-care specialty hospital in Pasco County, is testing the technology.

“The sanitizing stations allow us to establish new protocols that proactively prevent infections to ensure the best possible outcomes for patients while they’re in our care,” Debi Martoccio, chief operating officer at AdventHealth Connerton, said in a statement.

With any new technology, gaining traction and changing minds are tough to do, Beal said.

“It’s important to have someone the size and scope and reputation of AdventHealth that sees the benefit of what we are trying to accomplish,” he said.

There also are foot sanitizing stations at Cypress Creek Assisted Living in Sun City Center.

There are competitors that use UVC to disinfect shoes, Beal said. None of those companies combine UVC with ozone, a combination initially created by Asher Gil, an Israeli aeronautical engineer. Gil tested his combination of UVC and ozone at University of South Florida. Gil was bought out about three years ago by his partners, who further developed the technology and ran clinical tests. The product went to market in the fourth quarter of 2018.

Those initial owners and one outside investor have provided the capital for Green Earth Medical, now in its second round of fundraising, Beal said.

The company is headquartered in downtown St. Petersburg. It has four full-time employees, and contracts with distributors to market the sanitizing stations. There are about 25 to 30 representatives in the field marketing the product, and the company is in the early stages of talks with more healthcare facilities, as well as clean rooms and labs, Beal said.

The sanitizing stations are the only product right now, but other products are in the process of being patented, he said. He expects to ramp up development on those once the company gains traction.

“We are out trying to market, educate, change perceptions and shift the paradigms that exist around infection controls,” Beal said. “Our goal is to reduce bioburden in every facility that has an immune-compromised population.”

RESOURCE;  https://stpetecatalyst.com/st-pete-tech-company-steps-into-hospital-safety/

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ABC ACTION NEWS INTERVIEW WITH DEBI MORTOCCIO, COO – ADVENTHEALTH  CONNERTON

 

 

Researchers Find Inpatients Were Most Likely to Acquire a C.diff. Infection When Census Was Between 25-75% Capacity

In a study of more than 550,000 patient discharges from 327 California hospitals, researchers found that patients were most likely to contract Clostridium difficile (C.diff., CDI, C.difficile) —a stubborn and potentially deadly hospital-associated infection (HAI) —when inpatient wards were in the “middle range” of capacity, or between 25% and 75% full.

“Our hypothesis going in was essentially that when hospitals are busier, perhaps care quality is compromised,” Mahshid Abir, M.D., assistant professor of emergency medicine at UM Medical School and the study’s lead author, told FierceHealthcare. “Certainly when we saw these findings, we were surprised.”

Overall, more than 2,000 patients included in the study, which looked at discharges between 2008 and 2012, contracted C. diff during their hospital stay. Hospitals often struggle to control C. diff infections, and a significant number of readmissions can be linked to such infections.

By basing the study around a model that accounts for seasonal staffing changes or unit closure, for example, researchers were better able to filter out infections that a patient had before arriving at the hospital, she said. Calculating occupancy in this way could also help providers identify potential risk factor for infection, according to the study.

Patients admitted to a unit that was at between 25% and 75% capacity were three times more likely to contract C. diff compared to those in units at below 25% or above 75% capacity, according to the study.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/hospitals-health-systems/study-explores-link-between-hospital-occupancy-infection-rates

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) Releases New Guidance for Infectious Disease Outbreak Preparedness in Hospitals

 

 

New Document Guides Hospitals in Responding to Infectious Disease Outbreaks

Healthcare epidemiologists play key role in emergency preparedness and response

New expert guidance document for hospitals to use in preparing for and containing outbreaks was published today by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, with the support of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The guide was published in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

“This guidance details the role of the healthcare epidemiologist as an expert and leader supporting hospitals in preparing for, stopping, and recovering from infectious diseases crises,” said David Banach, MD, co-chair of the writing panel and Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Connecticut and Hospital Epidemiologist at UConn Health. “Armed with the resources to develop and support key activities, healthcare epidemiologists can utilize their skills and expertise in investigation and response to infectious disease outbreaks within a hospital’s incident command system.”

SHEA and CDC collaborated in 2016 to form the Outbreak Response Training Program to guide healthcare epidemiologists in how to maximize their facilities’ preparedness and response efforts to combat outbreaks such as Ebola, Zika, pandemic influenza, and other infectious diseases. The new document, Outbreak Response and Incident Management: SHEA Guidance and Resources for Healthcare Epidemiologists in United States Acute-Care Hospitals, leads epidemiologists through how to apply, use, and interact with emergency response structures, groups, and frameworks from the institutional to the federal levels, and provides an overview of essential resources. The principles in the guidance are intended for acute care hospitals, but may apply to other types of healthcare facilities, such as free-standing emergency departments and long-term care facilities.

According to the guidance document, during a crisis the epidemiologist provides medical and technical expertise and leads infection prevention and control efforts, coordinates with institutional stakeholders, and provides input into internal and external communications.

“We will always be faced with new and re-emerging pathogens,” said Lynn Johnston, MD, co-chair of the writing panel and professor of medicine and infectious diseases at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. “This guidance is part of an ongoing effort to develop tools and strategies to prevent and manage contagious diseases to ensure patient and public safety.”

The document is part of a partnership between SHEA and CDC to prepare for emerging and re-emerging infections by providing training, educational resources, and expert guidance for dealing with outbreaks in healthcare facilities. The program is designed to train U.S. healthcare epidemiologists, who oversee infection control programs, to have the skills, abilities, and tools available to implement infection control practices and provide a leadership voice in responding to infectious threats.

To operationalize the guidance, SHEA will conduct an outbreak response workshop in January, develop and post toolkits based on the recommendations, and provide online training modules and webinars.

 

 

To view article in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://www.shea-online.org/index.php/journal-news/press-room/press-release-archives/555-w-document-guides-hospitals-in-responding-to-infectious-disease-outbreaks

 

Hand-Washing aka Hand Hygiene Patient Education Proves Successful To Reduce C.diff. Infections

HandHygiene #1 Prevention

Hand-Washing aka hand hygiene Remains #1 In Infection Prevention In Every Setting.

“Despite evidence to suggest that [hand hygiene] is important in preventing infection, hospitalized patients are often not provided the opportunity to clean their hands,” due to mobility and cognitive obstacles as well as lack of education, investigators wrote.

Education on patient hand hygiene significantly reduced the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Mercy Hospital.

First, they conducted baseline surveys to assess patient hand hygiene, which showed patients needed more opportunities to wash their hands. Then nurse educators provided staff with an educational presentation on the importance of patient hand hygiene for preventing infection, which included specific times they should encourage and assist patients with hand hygiene. Staff then provided education and assistance to newly admitted patients, and researchers conducted additional surveys after implementation of this intervention.

During the first phase of the study involving just four medical-surgical nursing units, patient hand hygiene education increased significantly after the intervention (P < .0001). Overall, 97 follow-up surveys showed the proportion of those who received hand hygiene education increased from 34% to 64%, the opportunities provided for hand hygiene increased from 60% to 86%, and the average number of times hand hygiene was performed daily increased from 2.7 to 3.75.

After expanding the intervention to the whole hospital in the second phase of the study, 189 follow-up surveys showed that patient hand hygiene education increased from 48% to 53%. Meanwhile, overall opportunities for hand hygiene remained unchanged from 68%, and daily frequency of patient hand hygiene did not change significantly (mean, 2.4 vs. 2.6 times per day).

Notably, CDI rates dropped significantly during the 6 months following hospital-wide implementation.

“[Standardized infection ratio] P values for Q2 and W3 (0.0157 and 0.0103, respectively) were significantly lower than expected (P .05),” investigators wrote. “The Q4 SIR, however, showed an increase to 0.3844 over the 2 preceding quarters.”

They concluded that these findings showed patient hand hygiene “should be considered a potential addition to CDI prevention measures in hospitalized patients.” – by Adam Leitenberger

Source:  https://www.healio.com/gastroenterology/infection/news/online/%7B0ea95c50-ddec-4259-a229-5979fde9d8af%7D/patient-handwashing-cuts-c-difficile-rate-in-hospital

Medical Mattresses; Healthcare-acquired Infections and How Hospital Bedding Is Involved

Our guests Dr. Edmond Hooker, MD with Bruce Rippe, CEO of Trinity Guardion and  J. Darrel Hicks, BA, Master REH, CHESP joined us on C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network live broadcast –August 1st  to  discuss Healthcare – associated Infections (HAIs ) and how they lead to more than 720,000 illnesses and 75,000 deaths a year. In fact, more people die from HAIs each year than from automobile accidents. Furthermore, HAIs are a huge financial burden, adding $30 billion to annual healthcare costs. The American-made Trinity Patient Protection System gives hospitals the solution they need to reduce and eliminate HAIs.

Launderable, reusable, cost-effective and eco-friendly, the Trinity System’s fluid-proof covers fit around beds, pillows, stretchers and physical therapy tables. Unlike typical disinfectant agents designed for hard surfaces, the Trinity System keeps bacteria off the porous surface of the mattress, as well as, the bed deck. When laundered to CDC standards, the Trinity System removes 99.99% of bacteria and has been proven to reduce C. diff infection rates by about 50%.

 

www.trinityguardion.com

 

To learn more, from these leading topic-experts, about Medical Mattress Contamination and how bedding is involved in healthcare-associated infections.

Listen to the podcast available and part of the C.diff. Spores and More living library.

https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/100501/healthcare-acquired-infections-and-how-hospital-bedding-is-involved