Tag Archives: cdiff disinfecting

Making a Difference – Innovations in Infection Prevention 2020 Awards

Awards Announcement:

Making a Difference – Innovations in Infection Prevention 2020

C Diff Foundation acknowledges the following organizations “Making a Difference”
In the Infection Prevention community, with their innovative products, services, and
technologies addressing infection prevention.

 

 

 

 

Applied Silver
Innovation: SilvaClean® Technology
SilvaClean chemistry is EPA-approved as a laundry additive with residual activity
against post-laundry contamination.
The SilvaClean system is a dispensing device enabled by the Internet of Things (IoT)
that doses the EPA-approved SilvaClean chemistry onto textiles, leaving fabrics with
residual antimicrobial properties even after laundering (e.g. in storage, during handling
and in use).
http://www.appliedsilver.com/

 

 

 

 

Intellego Technologies
Innovation: UVC Dosimeter
Able to measure specific wavelengths of UVC radiation.
Can be correlated with a log reduction of microbiology samples e.g. MRSA and C. diff.
Proven functionality through hospital testing.
http://intellego-technologies.com/

 

 

 

 

Synexis Biodefense Systems
Innovation: Synexis Microorganism Reduction Systems
Patented Dry Hydrogen Peroxide (DHP) technology uses a building’s ambient humidity
and oxygen to continuously achieve sustainable reduction of microbial challenges from
viruses, bacteria, and mold in the air and on workplace surfaces.
DHP technology is inexpensive, highly scalable, and can be installed standalone or in
existing HVAC systems.
https://synexis.com/

Join Us in November!

Join Us at the 8th Annual International C. diff. Conference and Health EXPO taking
place in Boston, Massachusetts USA on November 12th and 13th, 2020 where we will
present and showcase these prestigious awards to the 2020 “Making a Difference” Innovations In Infection Prevention organizations.

Early Bird Registration is in progress — save over 20% until June 2020.

Congratulations to the organizations dedicated in preventing infections and for
developing products, services, and technology capable to ward off harmful bacteria in
all areas of health care and commercial environments. We are truly grateful for the
innovative measures taken to accomplish this goal.

 

 

C Diff Foundation, a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization, established in 2012, and
comprised of 100% volunteering professionals dedicated at supporting public health
through education and advocating for C. difficile infection (CDI) prevention, treatments,
clinical trials, diagnostics, and environmental safety worldwide.

 

(Disclaimer: C Diff Foundation declares no conflict of interest; no funds or influence
were provided to C Diff Foundation by any parties.)

 

Case Study Investigators Utilized a Bleach Product That Showed Significant Reduction In Contamination

 

 

By:Saskia v. Popescu Saskia v. Popescu, MPH, MA, CIC, is a hospital epidemiologist and infection preventionist with Phoenix Children’s Hospital. During her work as an infection preventionist she performed surveillance for infectious diseases, preparedness, and Ebola-response practices. She is currently a PhD candidate in Biodefense at George Mason University where her research focuses on the role of infection prevention in facilitating global health security efforts. She is certified in Infection Control.

Clostridium difficile (C diff) infections are pretty much a nightmare for infection preventionists. They cause horrible illness in patients and the spore is environmentally hardy, which makes disinfection efforts extremely challenging. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that, in the United States, half a million cases of C diff occur every year, and roughly 15,000 people die due to the infection. As a result of the severity of these infections and the challenges for infection control, it’s not surprising that surveillance and reporting is required not only by many state laws, but also reimbursement regulations through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). All of these factors make C diff prevention a major focus for hospitals.

Since the C diff spores are so environmental hardy, cleaning and disinfecting is particularly challenging. Bleach products are required to combat the spread of the spores on surfaces and fomites while soap and water is required for hand hygiene instead of alcohol-based hand sanitizer. These cleaning requirements pose problems though; sometimes bleach can be corrosive on medical equipment if manufacturer guidelines aren’t followed. Moreover, C diff can easily spread if patients aren’t isolated appropriately, if the room isn’t cleaned effectively, if hygiene failures occur, etc. One of the tough aspects of infection control in the face of C diff is the role of the asymptomatic carrier (i.e. the patient who is not experiencing symptoms that would trigger testing and isolation precautions but has the capacity to shed the spores).

A new study in the American Journal of Infection Control sought to address this often undervalued vector for transmission and the true burden of C diff spores in rooms after they were cleaned post-discharge and did not house a C diff patient. Investigators used the Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, a 215-bed acute care facility, to test whether cleaning with bleach products in non-C diff rooms would impact contamination.

Prior to their study, daily and discharge cleaning for C diff rooms utilized bleach wipes, while a quaternary ammonium disinfectant was used for non-C diff rooms. Investigators used Clorox Healthcare Fuzion Cleaner, which is a bleach spray that has less corrosive effects. Although cleaning efficacy had previously been measured with fluorescent markets, the team relied on cultures to identify both C diff spore and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination for this study.

Non-C diff rooms were tested for 3 weeks before the switch to the bleach-spray disinfectant and then, after the swap, tested again after cleaning of the room but before admission of a new patient. Ultimately, the goal was to determine how many rooms had environmental contamination with C diff spores before and after the change in disinfectants.

There were 51 non-C diff rooms tested after the post-discharge cleaning and prior to the switch to the bleach spray, and 39 non-C diff rooms were cultured after switching to the bleach product. The results were pretty astounding and definitely make the case for using bleach-based products in all post-discharge rooms.

Prior to switching products, 24% (12/51) of the rooms had contamination of at least one site (room and/or bathroom) and 10% had MRSA contamination. When cleaning practices were switched to use the bleach spray, the rate of contamination severely dropped—2 of 39 rooms. This trend was statistically significant and also seen in the MRSA contamination.

In this case, the investigators found that by using the bleach-based spray for the post-discharge cleaning of a non-C diff patient’s room, they reduced the contamination from 24% to 5%.

Although the study is limited to a single hospital, it encourages further investigation into general C diff contamination throughout hospitals and whether bleach-based cleaning should be performed upon all discharges, regardless of patient diagnosis with C diff infections.

As C diff continues to grow as a public health and health care concern, the role of environmental contamination will only become more critical. This study sheds light on a new cleaning strategy for hospital-wide disinfecting efforts to reduce microbial burden and C diff contamination. 

To view article in its entirety – please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.contagionlive.com/contributor/saskia-v-popescu/2019/02/fighting-c-diff-contamination-with-a-different-cleaning-approach?fbclid=IwAR3YS1CoSTiCyQ-FJ11N2UHWAMmzGUKnCLp7Uy2MxysbtZfAGTQ2EJANILU