Category Archives: Healthcare Technology

Merck and Premier Applied Sciences Will Develop Software To Provide C.difficile Infection Education and Provide Surveillance

Merck & Co is working a major US hospital provider on a new software system that could help tackle the threat from healthcare-associated infections, the leading HAI:   C. diff.  infections.

 

 

 

The pharma company’s deal with Premier will see the partners develop and test the combination of a software-based platform and a coordinator to provide surveillance, consultation, support and education to patients with Clostridium difficile infection (C. diff).

Sam Bozzette, MD, chief scientist of Premier’s retrospective and interventional research division Premier Applied Sciences, said: “By increasing clinician and patient knowledge of this often prolonged, and sometimes deadly infection, and developing and testing a software-based application to help reduce the recurrence of C. diff. infection by improving follow-up and management, we believe there is a strong potential to make a real difference to address this critical public health problem.”

Sam Bozzette, MD, PhD, vice president and chief scientist of its retrospective and interventional research division, Premier Applied Sciences.  An internationally-recognized researcher and physician executive, Dr. Bozzette provides strategic clinical, analytical and operational direction to further grow the Premier Applied Sciences research business and improve the overall quality, safety and cost-effectiveness of care.  “Dr. Bozzette is a leader in medical and social sciences, and has more than 25 years of experience working with academic and non-profit healthcare providers to improve clinical decision-making practices, care delivery efficiency and effectiveness, and population health management,” said Leigh Anderson, chief information officer at Premier. “We are thrilled to have him on board to lead Premier’s data-driven research efforts to set new standards in care delivery through strategic partnerships with healthcare industry leaders across the U.S.”

Premier Applied Sciences, formerly known as Premier Research Services, combines data and analytics with objective clinical outcomes analyses, and partnerships with health systems, life sciences companies, academic institutions and professional societies to develop, teach, test and research care delivery practices and real-world interventions for healthcare improvement. It offers real-world research and analytics, retrospective research, healthcare education, clinical trial innovation and data licensing services.

Resources:  https://pharmaphorum.com/news/merck-co-software-c-diff-infections/

https://www.premierinc.com/dr-sam-bozzette-joins-premier-inc-lead-research-division/

The work expands Merck’s chronic disease work with Premier, which has seen them co-develop and test solutions that help promote wellness and prevention for specific groups of at-risk patients since 2016.

Raquel Tapia, associate VP, hospital/specialty marketing at Merck, said: “Combining the technical capabilities of Premier and the therapeutic area expertise of Merck has been instrumental in our ability to address these difficult healthcare challenges.

“By testing the solutions in real-world settings and learning from our growing knowledge base, we’re confident that our work together will help patients.”

The partners’ goal is to increase patient access to healthcare services, raise awareness of how to decrease patient risk of recurrence and help patients identify if they are having a recurrence.

The proposed C. diff software intervention will be tested within volunteer Premier member health systems. The firm current has an alliance of around 3,900 US hospitals and health systems and a further 150,000 or so healthcare providers and organizations.

C. diff infections cause serious and life-threatening diarrhea and have become one of the most common microbial cause of healthcare-associated infections in US hospitals. It’s thought that C. diff infections affect approximately half a million people and add $4.8 billion to US healthcare costs each year.

California Hemet Valley Medical Center Adds UV Technology to Enhance Patient Safety

Hemet Valley Medical Center has implemented innovative ultraviolet technology with the addition of the Clorox Healthcare® Optimum-UV® System. The system helps remove harmful bacteria and pathogens that can jeopardize health, providing patients, visitors and staff with an additional layer of safety and protection.

Researchers at Boston-based Massachusetts General Hospital, Ann Arbor-based University of Michigan and Cambridge-based Massachusetts Institute of Technology Are Developing Institution-Specific Models That Predict Patient’s Risk Of Acquiring C.diff. Infections

Researchers at Boston-based Massachusetts General Hospital, Ann Arbor-based University of Michigan and Cambridge-based Massachusetts Institute of Technology are developing hospital-specific machine learning models that predict patients’ risk of Clostridium difficile infections much sooner than current diagnostic methods allow, according to a study published in Infection Control & Epidemiology.

“Despite substantial efforts to prevent C. diff infection and to institute early treatment upon diagnosis, rates of infection continue to increase,” co-senior study author Erica Shenoy, MD, PhD, said in a press release. “We need better tools to identify the highest risk patients so that we can target both prevention and treatment interventions to reduce further transmission and improve patient outcomes.”

The study authors noted most previous approaches to C. diff  infection risk were limited in usefulness since they were not hospital-specific and were developed as “one-size-fits-all” models that only included a few risk factors.

Therefore, to predict a patient’s C. diff risk throughout the course of their hospital stay, the researchers took a “big data” approach that analyzed the entire EHR. This method allows for institution-specific models that could be tailored to different patient populations, different EHR systems and factors specific to each facility. 

“When data are simply pooled into a one-size-fits-all model, institutional differences in patient populations, hospital layouts, testing and treatment protocols, or even in the way staff interact with the EHR can lead to differences in the underlying data distributions and ultimately to poor performance of such a model,” said co-senior study author Jenna Wiens, PhD. “To mitigate these issues, we take a hospital-specific approach, training a model tailored to each institution.”

With this machine learning-based model, the researchers looked at de-identified data, which included individual patient demographics and medical history, details on admissions and daily hospitalization, and the likelihood of C. diff exposure. The data was gathered from the EHRs of roughly 257,000 patients admitted to either MGH or to Michigan Medicine over two-year and six-year periods, respectively.

The models proved to be highly successful at predicting patients who would ultimately be diagnosed with C. diff. In half of these infected patients, accurate predictions could have been made at least five days before collecting diagnostic samples, which would allow hospitals to focus on antimicrobial interventions on the highest-risk patients.

The study’s risk prediction score could guide early screening for C. diff if validated in subsequent studies. For patients who receive an earlier diagnosis, treatment initiation could curb illness severity, and patients with confirmed C. diff could be isolated to prevent transmission to other patients.

The algorithm code is freely available here for hospital leaders to review and adapt for their institutions. However, Dr. Shenoy notes facilities looking to apply similar algorithms to their own institutions must assemble the appropriate local subject-matter experts and validate the performance of the models in their institutions.

To read article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/quality/how-machine-learning-models-are-rapidly-predicting-c-diff-infections.html

Xenex Disinfection Services’ LightStrike™ Robot With Pulsed Xenon Ultraviolet-C (UV-C) Light Technology Introduces Its LightStrike Disinfection Pod

The scientific evidence has clearly established that in the hospital environment, microorganisms such as Clostridium difficile (C.diff), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are responsible for the infections that kill nearly 300
people in the U.S. every day.

Xenex Disinfection Services’ LightStrike™ Robot with pulsed xenon ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light technology is a proven solution that quickly destroys deadly viruses, bacteria and spores before they pose a threat to patients and healthcare workers. LightStrike Robots help healthcare facilities reduce their HAI rates by destroying the microscopic germs that may be missed during the manual cleaning process. Xenex robots use pulsed xenon, a noble gas, to create Full Spectrum™, high intensity UV light that quickly destroys infectious germs in less than five minutes. Hospitals using Xenex devices have published clinical outcome studies in peer-reviewed journals showing 50-100 percent reductions in C.diff, MRSA and Surgical Site Infection rates when those hospitals used LightStrike Robots to disinfect rooms.

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Now, for the first time, hospitals can utilize the power of

LightStrike Germ-Zapping Robots™ to quickly disinfect mobile equipment just as effectively as they disinfect rooms within their facility. Pathogens like C.diff, Acinetobacter baumannii, MRSA and Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) can travel throughout a healthcare facility on mobile equipment.

To address this gap in the infection control process, Xenex recently partnered with an industry leader in containment units, Mintie Technologies, Inc., to create the LightStrike Disinfection Pod.

Designed to quickly disinfect reusable mobile equipment such as isolettes, ventilators, pressure monitors, wheelchairs and workstations, the

LightStrike Disinfection Pod enables the power of the LightStrike Robot’s intense, germicidal light to be used anywhere in a facility.
The Pod is collapsible, mobile and can be positioned in a hospital hallway or other areas without disrupting or impeding daily workflow. Its proprietary design integrates reflective interior fabric ensuring 360 degrees of UV light coverage over difficult-to-clean equipment including anesthesia carts, ventilators, and mobile imaging machines.

To access and read the article in its entirety please click on the link below:

https://www.dotmed.com/news/story/37771

UV-C Disinfecting Takes Its Place At Thompson Hospital and the M.M. Ewing Continuing Care Center in New York State

 

UV Disinfecting

Accomplished by using  short-wave
ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light as a germicidal to destroy viruses, bacteria and other pathogens that can linger on surfaces and hide in shadows.

One piece of equipmnet can disinfect an average-sized patient room in about 8 minutes and is deployed after a room is sanitized with standard techniques and cleaning products.

In  Canandaigua, New York  a nearly 6 foot tall and wielding 20 vertical fluorescent bulbs, the R-D Rapid Disinfector robot is a formidable fighter in the war against germs.

This UV disinfecting robot is The R-D Rapid Disinfector — developed by a Rochester, New York  firm, Steriliz LLC, and is manufactured locally.

Thompson Hospital and the M.M. Ewing Continuing Care Center have begun using this automated disinfecting machine throughout the institutions to help reduce the risks of illness and infections for patients, residents, visitors and staff.

The Disinfector uses short-wave ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light as a germicidal to destroy viruses, bacteria and other pathogens that can linger on surfaces and hide in shadows. This machine can disinfect an average-sized patient room in about 8 minutes and is deployed after a room is sanitized with standard techniques. It is remotely controlled by an associate from Environmental Services.

The UV-C light fills the entire room, reaching and disinfecting areas that human hands might miss. No one is allowed inside the room when the lights are working. This no-touch cleaning system gets rid of some of the most dangerous and difficult-to-destroy bacteria, including Clostridium difficile (C. diff). Disinfectants work on the surface of non-living objects by destroying the cell wall of harmful microbes or interfering with their metabolism.

“This technology, added on to normal, regular, manual environmental cleaning, gives me a sense of ease that we are doing all we can to keep our environment clean and our patients safe,” said Thompson Health Director of Infection Prevention Michelle Vignari. “We are just now starting to see published literature supporting that the addition of UV-C technology in hospitals actually does correlate with a reduction of healthcare-acquired infections.”

This state-of-the-art robot monitors the entire disinfection process. Wireless sensors measure, record and report on UV-C light dosages delivered to specific areas in real time. The machine can be paused and repositioned to maximize efficiency, including targeting shadowed areas. The Disinfector shuts off automatically once the sensors indicate that enough UV-C light has been emitted to kill the germs.

“In a day of delivering high-reliability care, I felt very strongly that we needed a technology that we could measure and evaluate its performance,” Vignari said.

Hospital staff like the Disinfector too.

“It is pretty simple to use and seems to be working great,” said Stephanie Fowler of Environmental Services, who activates the robot after a room is cleaned with traditional methods.

The R-D Rapid Disinfector was developed by a Rochester firm, Steriliz LLC, and is manufactured locally. The Disinfector uniquely provides FDA-patented wireless sensors to measure the amount of UV-C light delivered to an area and real-time online data access and reports. Since being tried in four Rochester hospitals in 2011, several hundred of these Disinfectors are now being used in hospitals, care homes, disaster centers and government installations worldwide.

Steriliz is recognized as a world leader in UV-C disinfection.

“Improving the health and safety of patients is a blessed opportunity,” said CEO and President Sam Trapani. “The potential market for the company’s product is large and we are experiencing a high growth curve.”

To read the article in its entirety please click on the link below:

http://www.mpnnow.com/news/20170318/robot-destroys-germs-with-power-of-light

Member of St. Joseph Hoag Health Network – Mission Hospital Laguna Beach, CA Adds a UV Disinfection Robot To Protect Against the Spread of Infections

6th Graders Receive Up Close and Personal Education with a Light-Pulsing, Disinfecting Robot

Sharing and Educating

Opening eyes of the young with disinfecting

technology being utilized to combat “superbugs.”

 

The only robot in the Verdugo region that zaps away unwanted bacteria and viruses from hospital rooms arrived at USC-Verdugo Hills Hospital two weeks ago.

The Xenex robot emits a pulsating, bright white UV-C light — which is a short, wavelength, ultraviolet light that can save lives. Once surfaces are exposed to the robot’s rays, harmful bacteria and viruses die, greatly reducing the odds patients will be infected with hospital-acquired infections, including those caused by superbugs such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, known as MRSA.

USC-Verdugo Hills Hospital employees joined Xenex employees at Fremont Elementary School, where they showcased the $100,000 machine in teacher Mallory Kane’s sixth-grade classroom, the same place where Keith Hobbs, chief executive of Verdugo Hills Hospital, was a sixth-grader in 1979. “There’s no other place that I would rather be than to come back to my alma mater and share this R2D2, bug-zapping machine with you guys,” Hobbs said.

The Xenex robot pulses UV-C light 67 times per second, and hospital staff take precautions when they operate it because the light can harm their eyes.

“This is not any light bulb in your house,” said Mary Virgallito, director of patient safety for the hospital. “It’s actually filled with a gas called xenon.”

Virgallito said hospital employees manually clean rooms before they activate Xenex. It takes the robot about 15 minutes to clean a patient’s room, and 20 minutes to disinfect an operating room.Hobbs said mothers ask if they can borrow the robot to disinfect their own homes, and Kane suggested it would be helpful in the classroom. Over the past several weeks, many of her students missed school because they were sick.

Jeff Mamalakis, business development manager for Xenex, volunteered to disinfect Kane’s room when school let out. The space would be left with a scent as if lightning had just struck, Virgallito said.  The impromptu high-tech, germ-cleansing session was a dream come true for Kane.

“In sixth grade, the curriculum moves so quickly that even missing one day puts kids so far behind,” Kane said. “Having our classroom disinfected every day would be a dream come true. My kids would be here, everyone would be happy, no one would have to miss school.”

To Read the article in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/uhc-most-xenex-germ-zapping-144500378.html;_ylt=A0LEV18lQNBY2KgA6FZXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTEzMXBobHNmBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDVUkwMkM0XzEEc2VjA3Nj