Category Archives: EPA Registered C. diff kill cleaning products: Environmental Safety

Summit Therapeutics Shares New Data – Phase 2 Clinical Trial of ridinilazole for C. difficile infection (CDI)

Summit Therapeutics Reports New Data from Phase 2 Clinical Trial Connecting Ridinilazole’s Microbiome Preservation to Improved Clinical Outcomes for Patients with C. difficile Infection

October 2019

Summit Therapeutics announced the presentation of new data that explain the link between two key findings in the Company’s Phase 2 clinical trial of ridinilazole for C. difficile infection (‘CDI’):

  • Ridinilazole demonstrated superior efficacy compared to vancomycin, driven by a 60% lower recurrence rate.
  • Ridinilazole preserved the diversity of the gut microbiome.

Researchers at Tufts University, collaborating with Summit, showed that these findings are connected mechanistically by bile acids, part of the ‘metabolome’ of active chemicals made or modified by gut bacteria. Bile acids exist in different forms that can either favour or block the regrowth of C. difficile after treatment. Vancomycin kills bacteria that turn pro-C. difficile bile acids into anti-C. difficile bile acids – leaving an adverse ratio of pro- and anti-growth chemicals that favours the regrowth of C. difficile and the recurrence of C. difficile infection. By contrast, ridinilazole leaves these bacteria unharmed, allowing them to keep converting pro-C. difficile bile acids into anti-C. difficile bile acids, maintaining a positive chemical balance that prevents C. difficile recurrence.

“The damaging effect of broad-spectrum antibiotics in the treatment of CDI is far-reaching from the make-up and function of the gut microbiome through the poor clinical outcomes seen in one third of patients, driven by a high rate of disease recurrence,” said Dr David Roblin, President of R&D of Summit. “Ridinilazole has the potential to be a targeted CDI treatment that could result in significantly better patient outcomes for the over half million US patients per year who have an episode of CDI. These latest data help to put the science behind the function of a healthy microbiome into context and highlight its importance in sustaining CDI cures.”

The Phase 2 clinical trial enrolled 100 patients, half of whom received ridinilazole and the other half vancomycin. For both groups, there was a higher ratio of pro-C. difficile to anti C.-difficile bile acids at the start of treatment. This was expected, as patients who get CDI have perturbed microbiomes. However, during treatment, the proportion of anti-C. difficile bile acids increased in patients treated with ridinilazole, whereas patients treated with vancomycin initially showed decreases in anti-C. difficile bile acids and had stools dominated by pro-C. difficile bile acids. By the end of treatment, ridinilazole-treated patients’ bile acid ratios returned towards a healthy, non-CDI state. These results support the data from the Phase 2 clinical trial, in which patients receiving ridinilazole showed a statistically significant improvement in sustained clinical responses.

Copies of the two poster presentations are available in the Publications section of Summit’s website, www.summitplc.com.

To read press release and additional press releases  click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.summitplc.com

Path03Gen Is Taking a Step In the Right Direction to Reduce Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI’s)

Amazing research and developments are taking place all across the globe.

In St. Petersburg, Florida there is an organization dedicated in fighting  harmful pathogens and the St. Pete Catalyst’s Journalist Margie Manning had the following to report on the “Green Earth Medical Solutions” technology company:

Green Earth Medical Solutions developed technology that kills germs on the bottom of shoes, which often are overlooked as a source for bacteria, virus and other disease-causing microorganisms.

The company’s PathO3Gen sanitizing stations combine UVC, a type of ultraviolet light, and ozone, to sanitize shoes. Anyone entering a healthcare facility or a critical care area steps on the station and waits for about six seconds. When they step off, 99.9 percent of the deadly pathogens have been eliminated, said chief operating officer Scott Beal.

Healthcare acquired infections, or HAIs, cause about 100,000 deaths every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There’s been a lot of attention paid to infection control in healthcare, most of it focused on hand washing and cleaning high-touch surfaces. A 2017 clinical study showed 77 percent of the soles of shoes walking into a hospital contained superbugs such as MRSA and C. difficile, or a combination of the two.

“Initially, clinicians said ‘we don’t operate on the floors, those are not areas of concern,’” Beal said. “But the infection control community and stakeholders have been coming out with more and more published credible studies that say what is tracked in on the floor is getting airborne and aerosolized, and makes it to high-touch areas, which then cause HAIs.”

Reducing pathogens tracked in by shoes also increases the efficacy of other sanitizing methods, because the building is not being overrun by germs, Beal said.

Hospitals have financial reasons to reduce hospital-acquired infections. Beginning in 2015, federal reimbursements to hospitals were directly affected by their HAI rates.

AdventHealth Connerton, an acute-care specialty hospital in Pasco County, is testing the technology.

“The sanitizing stations allow us to establish new protocols that proactively prevent infections to ensure the best possible outcomes for patients while they’re in our care,” Debi Martoccio, chief operating officer at AdventHealth Connerton, said in a statement.

With any new technology, gaining traction and changing minds are tough to do, Beal said.

“It’s important to have someone the size and scope and reputation of AdventHealth that sees the benefit of what we are trying to accomplish,” he said.

There also are foot sanitizing stations at Cypress Creek Assisted Living in Sun City Center.

There are competitors that use UVC to disinfect shoes, Beal said. None of those companies combine UVC with ozone, a combination initially created by Asher Gil, an Israeli aeronautical engineer. Gil tested his combination of UVC and ozone at University of South Florida. Gil was bought out about three years ago by his partners, who further developed the technology and ran clinical tests. The product went to market in the fourth quarter of 2018.

Those initial owners and one outside investor have provided the capital for Green Earth Medical, now in its second round of fundraising, Beal said.

The company is headquartered in downtown St. Petersburg. It has four full-time employees, and contracts with distributors to market the sanitizing stations. There are about 25 to 30 representatives in the field marketing the product, and the company is in the early stages of talks with more healthcare facilities, as well as clean rooms and labs, Beal said.

The sanitizing stations are the only product right now, but other products are in the process of being patented, he said. He expects to ramp up development on those once the company gains traction.

“We are out trying to market, educate, change perceptions and shift the paradigms that exist around infection controls,” Beal said. “Our goal is to reduce bioburden in every facility that has an immune-compromised population.”

RESOURCE;  https://stpetecatalyst.com/st-pete-tech-company-steps-into-hospital-safety/

.

ABC ACTION NEWS INTERVIEW WITH DEBI MORTOCCIO, COO – ADVENTHEALTH  CONNERTON

 

 

Multidisciplinary Program Duke University Medical Center Included UVC Disinfection Technology To Reduce Hospital-Acquired Infections Including CDI

IN THE NEWS………………..

A new manuscript has been accepted by the Journal of the American College of Surgeons which examines C. diff in adult surgical patients. The paper, “Multidisciplinary Approach and Clostridium difficile Infection in Adult Surgical Patients,” discusses the multidisciplinary program that Duke University Medical Center implemented to reduce its C. diff rate.

In 2017, Duke University Medical Center was identified as a “High Outlier” for postoperative C. diff infections in the American College of Surgeons NSQIP semi-annual report with .4 percent cases per year with an increased risk in morbidity and mortality. To address the issue,

“The Department of Surgery initiated a CDI Task Force with representation from Surgery, Infectious Disease, Pharmacy and Performance Services to analyze available data, identify opportunities for improvement and implement strategies to reduce CDI,” the manuscript states.

Strategies to reduce CDI included antimicrobial stewardship optimization, increased use of Tru-D SmartUVC for terminal cleaning of CDI patient rooms, increased hand hygiene and PPE signage as well as monitoring in high-risk CDI areas, improved diagnostic stewardship by an electronic best practice advisory to reduce inappropriate CDI testing, education through surgical grand rounds and routine data feedback via NSQIP and NHSN CDI reports.

Using these strategies, observed rate of C. diff decreased from 1.27 percent in 2016 to 0.91 percent in 2017, a 28 percent decrease.

“Reducing hospital-acquired infections, especially C. diff, takes a multidisciplinary approach and a commitment to numerous infection prevention protocols,” Alice Brewer, MPH, CIC, Director of Clinical Affairs for Tru-D SmartUVC, said.

As one of the strategies, “We reviewed the terminal cleaning policies for rooms occupied by patients with known CDI once they were discharged from the hospital,” the authors stated. “Additionally, the success at eliminating C. difficile through the established terminal cleans was verified through an auditing process. However, the audit demonstrated that there was variability and ineffective cleaning practices within the hospital system. These deficiencies were largely due to lack of Environmental Services staff and staff trained in Tru-D technology.”

The conclusion provided a basis for requesting the hiring and training of additional Environmental Services staff and “expanded training for terminal cleans was used for the Tru-D technology system, a system which uses an ultraviolet light cleaning system to denature the spores of C. difficile. This provided more effective terminal cleaning.”

By training five additional Tru-D operators, the facility went from using Tru-D on 30 percent of C. diff rooms to 100 percent of C. diff rooms. “Appropriately trained Tru-D technicians increased in number following the initiative from two in 2017 to seven in 2019.

This increase in technicians allowed for an increase in terminal cleans by Tru-D Ultraviolet therapy from 30 percent in March 2017 to 100 percent in September 2018,” the manuscript states.

Validated by multiple studies including the only randomized clinical trial on UVC disinfection, Tru-D has been proven to be a chemical-free and environmentally-friendly way of providing thorough room disinfection. UVC is a type of energy that is invisible to the human eye. Its wavelengths are between 200 and 300 nanometers, making them germicidal – meaning they are capable of inactivating microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses and protozoa.

“It has been proven that increased utilization of Tru-D and UVC disinfection technology correlates to a reduction in hospital-acquired infections, including C. diff,” Brewer said. “By training additional staff in the operation of Tru-D, Duke was able to achieve 100 percent utilization, which helped to contribute to the 28 percent reduction in C. diff infections.”

To Read Article In Its Entirety – Please Click On the Following Link To Be Redirected:

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/duke-university-medical-center-reduces-postoperative-c-diff-rates-with-bundled-approach-300800682.html

Mayo Clinic Pulsed Xenon UV Room Disinfection Study Reports 47% Reduction in C.diff. Infection Rates

 

Even with the world’s most robust infection prevention strategy and protocols, the Mayo Clinic wanted to further reduce its patients’ risk for contracting C.diff and conducted a controlled study to evaluate the effectiveness of Xenex Disinfection Systems’ pulsed xenon ultraviolet (UV) light room disinfection technology. The study, published in the American Journal of Infection Control, found that adding pulsed xenon UV disinfection to the hospital’s disinfection efforts resulted in a 47% reduction in C.diff infection rates on the intervention units that has been sustained for two years. In addition, the facility saw an increase in patient satisfaction scores for environmental cleanliness and a 52% reduction in Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) infection rates.

Based on the significant C.diff infection rate reductions in the intervention units, the Mayo Clinic expanded pulsed xenon UV room disinfection to 14 additional hospital units with high rates of C.diff infection utilizing 12 robots. This wide-scale implementation resulted in a facility-wide reduction in its Standardized Infection Rate (SIR) from 0.774 to 0.571. SIR rates are used by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to calculate hospital reimbursement.

Many hospital patients, especially those on antibiotics, are susceptible to C.diff, which can live for up to five months on surfaces in the hospital. A person with C.diff may contaminate their hospital room and bathroom, leaving C.diff spores on the walls, handles and other high-touch surfaces. These spores can be easily transferred to the next patient or healthcare worker in that room. For this study, the Mayo Clinic deployed two Xenex LightStrike™ Germ-Zapping Robots™ that utilize intense pulsed xenon UV light to quickly destroy pathogens like C.diff and VRE that may be lurking on high-touch surfaces in a room, such as bedrails, tray tables and doorknobs. The robot is easy to use and does not require warm-up or cool-down time, so it’s easily transported from room to room.

In the controlled trial, the first of its kind using pulsed xenon UV disinfection technology, three hospital units (two hematology and bone marrow transplant units and one medical-surgical unit) were designated for pulsed xenon UV intervention, and three units with similar patient populations served as control units. Because of the high C.diff infection rates, all patient rooms on the targeted units were cleaned with bleach daily and at terminal cleaning. In addition to tracking C.diff infection rates, hand hygiene, isolation compliance, and antimicrobial usage were followed on all the units. The only difference in the infection control programs between the controlled units and intervention units was the addition of LightStrike pulsed xenon UV disinfection. LightStrike robots were used after terminal cleaning in 85% of all discharges on the targeted intervention units.

“The Mayo Clinic has a world class infection prevention program that is extremely well-run and well monitored. Their success in reducing C.diff rates is strong evidence that pulsed xenon UV room disinfection can be a very effective tool in a hospital’s infection prevention bundle,” said Dr. Mark Stibich, Chief Scientific Officer at Xenex. “This is very exciting research for several reasons. First, the hospital achieved and sustained lower C.diff rates. Second, hospitals may be confused about the different kinds of UV technologies and their effectiveness, especially after a previous study using mercury UV devices did not show a reduction in C.diff infection rates. This data – and the story of how the Mayo Clinic achieved success in a controlled trial – demonstrates that Xenex’s pulsed xenon UV disinfection technology should be added to the infection prevention bundle as standard of care to enhance patient safety.”

TO view this article in its entirety – please click on this link to be redirected:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190220005745/en/Mayo-Clinic-Study-Reports-47-Reduction-C.diff

 

CLINICAL TRIAL IN PROGRESS 

Pulsed UV Xenon Disinfection to Prevent Resistant Healthcare Associated Infection

Recruitment Status : Recruiting

First Posted : November 21, 2017
Last Update Posted : November 27, 2018

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03349268

Information from the National Library of Medicine To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03349268

 

Contacts
Contact: Keith S. Kaye, MD, MPH 734-615-1901 keithka@med.umich.edu
Contact: Jolene E Daniel 734-615-1901 jolened@med.umich.edu

 

Locations
United States, Michigan
Detroit Medical Center Recruiting
Detroit, Michigan, United States, 48205
Contact: Paul Kilgore, MD    313-577-1215    paul.kilgore@wayne.edu
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Michigan
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)
Xenex Disinfection Services LLC
Detroit Medical Center
Henry Ford Health System
TEMPVA Research Group, Inc.
Wayne State University
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Keith S. Kaye, MD, MPH University of Michigan

STUDY DESCRIPTION:

Brief Summary:

The objective is to conduct a prospective, sham controlled, double-blinded, interventional crossover trial to compare standard terminal cleaning plus PX-UV (intervention) with standard terminal cleaning plus sham PX-UV (control) with crossover at 12 months, following a 6-month washout period. Outcome measures include the rates of HAIs, as well as the recurrence of genetically identical clinical strains of HAIs among patients on study units. The study will be conducted in 2 hospitals covering 16 total hospital units at Detroit Medical Center. Our central hypothesis is that the addition of PX-UV to standard terminal cleaning will be associated with a significant reduction in the rate of HAIs, as well as a reduction in the recovery of genetically identical strains of MDROs. The impact of PX-UV disinfection on rates of HAIs on study units will be determined by comparing rates of HAIs on a) study units where PX-UV is added to standard terminal cleaning practices to b) units where a sham UV disinfection system is added to standard terminal cleaning; and by comparing rates of HAIs on the same medical ward during each of two 12-month phases of a crossover study (one phase when a PX-UV device is added and one when a sham device is added to standard terminal cleaning).

The long-term goal of this project is to establish the efficacy of terminal cleaning plus PX-UV in reducing rates of HAIs due to the following multi-drug resistant organisms (MDROs): C. difficile, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Acinetobacter baumannii.

At the conclusion of the proposed project, novel data will be generated from this rigorously controlled study regarding the effectiveness of PX-UV in reducing HAIs in a representative, real-world healthcare setting.

To learn more about this Clinical study in progress – please click on the following link to be redirected to clinicaltrials.gov

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03349268?cond=Clostridium+Difficile&draw=5&rank=240

 

 

Case Study Investigators Utilized a Bleach Product That Showed Significant Reduction In Contamination

 

 

By:Saskia v. Popescu Saskia v. Popescu, MPH, MA, CIC, is a hospital epidemiologist and infection preventionist with Phoenix Children’s Hospital. During her work as an infection preventionist she performed surveillance for infectious diseases, preparedness, and Ebola-response practices. She is currently a PhD candidate in Biodefense at George Mason University where her research focuses on the role of infection prevention in facilitating global health security efforts. She is certified in Infection Control.

Clostridium difficile (C diff) infections are pretty much a nightmare for infection preventionists. They cause horrible illness in patients and the spore is environmentally hardy, which makes disinfection efforts extremely challenging. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that, in the United States, half a million cases of C diff occur every year, and roughly 15,000 people die due to the infection. As a result of the severity of these infections and the challenges for infection control, it’s not surprising that surveillance and reporting is required not only by many state laws, but also reimbursement regulations through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). All of these factors make C diff prevention a major focus for hospitals.

Since the C diff spores are so environmental hardy, cleaning and disinfecting is particularly challenging. Bleach products are required to combat the spread of the spores on surfaces and fomites while soap and water is required for hand hygiene instead of alcohol-based hand sanitizer. These cleaning requirements pose problems though; sometimes bleach can be corrosive on medical equipment if manufacturer guidelines aren’t followed. Moreover, C diff can easily spread if patients aren’t isolated appropriately, if the room isn’t cleaned effectively, if hygiene failures occur, etc. One of the tough aspects of infection control in the face of C diff is the role of the asymptomatic carrier (i.e. the patient who is not experiencing symptoms that would trigger testing and isolation precautions but has the capacity to shed the spores).

A new study in the American Journal of Infection Control sought to address this often undervalued vector for transmission and the true burden of C diff spores in rooms after they were cleaned post-discharge and did not house a C diff patient. Investigators used the Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, a 215-bed acute care facility, to test whether cleaning with bleach products in non-C diff rooms would impact contamination.

Prior to their study, daily and discharge cleaning for C diff rooms utilized bleach wipes, while a quaternary ammonium disinfectant was used for non-C diff rooms. Investigators used Clorox Healthcare Fuzion Cleaner, which is a bleach spray that has less corrosive effects. Although cleaning efficacy had previously been measured with fluorescent markets, the team relied on cultures to identify both C diff spore and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination for this study.

Non-C diff rooms were tested for 3 weeks before the switch to the bleach-spray disinfectant and then, after the swap, tested again after cleaning of the room but before admission of a new patient. Ultimately, the goal was to determine how many rooms had environmental contamination with C diff spores before and after the change in disinfectants.

There were 51 non-C diff rooms tested after the post-discharge cleaning and prior to the switch to the bleach spray, and 39 non-C diff rooms were cultured after switching to the bleach product. The results were pretty astounding and definitely make the case for using bleach-based products in all post-discharge rooms.

Prior to switching products, 24% (12/51) of the rooms had contamination of at least one site (room and/or bathroom) and 10% had MRSA contamination. When cleaning practices were switched to use the bleach spray, the rate of contamination severely dropped—2 of 39 rooms. This trend was statistically significant and also seen in the MRSA contamination.

In this case, the investigators found that by using the bleach-based spray for the post-discharge cleaning of a non-C diff patient’s room, they reduced the contamination from 24% to 5%.

Although the study is limited to a single hospital, it encourages further investigation into general C diff contamination throughout hospitals and whether bleach-based cleaning should be performed upon all discharges, regardless of patient diagnosis with C diff infections.

As C diff continues to grow as a public health and health care concern, the role of environmental contamination will only become more critical. This study sheds light on a new cleaning strategy for hospital-wide disinfecting efforts to reduce microbial burden and C diff contamination. 

To view article in its entirety – please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.contagionlive.com/contributor/saskia-v-popescu/2019/02/fighting-c-diff-contamination-with-a-different-cleaning-approach?fbclid=IwAR3YS1CoSTiCyQ-FJ11N2UHWAMmzGUKnCLp7Uy2MxysbtZfAGTQ2EJANILU

Clorox Healthcare® VersaSure™ Cleaner Disinfectant Wipes Introduced

Patented alcohol-free quat technology with the versatility to use throughout healthcare settings with broad-spectrum disinfection

 

 

Clorox Healthcare is proud to announce the latest addition to its industry-leading portfolio of healthcare disinfectants: new Clorox Healthcare® VersaSureCleaner Disinfectant Wipes, an innovative, alcohol-free quat solution versatile enough to use on common healthcare surfaces with the assurance of broad-spectrum disinfection.

Clorox Healthcare® VersaSureCleaner Disinfectant Wipes are Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered to kill 44 pathogens, including bacteria, viruses and fungi, in two minutes or less. The unique, low odor, low residue formula features patented technology that enhances quat activity on surfaces to deliver broader efficacy and faster kill times without co-actives. The result is a versatile, one-step cleaner disinfectant wipe with the speed and efficacy healthcare facilities rely on and superior aesthetics, wetness and cleaning power needed for convenient, compliant use facility-wide.

Clorox Healthcare® VersaSureCleaner Disinfectant Wipes’ innovative new formula provides:

  • Speed and Strength Against Key Pathogens: VersaSure is EPA-registered to kill 44 microorganisms, including 14 multi-drug resistant pathogens, in two minutes or less. VersaSure kills influenza viruses, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), measles, mumps and other viruses in 30 seconds1 and kills bacteria and fungi, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE), Escherichia coli (E. coli), salmonella, mycobacterium bovis (TB) and Candida albicans, in two minutes.
  • Excellent Aesthetics and Cleaning Power: Patented alcohol-free quat technology and innovative wipe design combine to provide excellent aesthetics, wetness and cleaning power. The low residue formula is designed for superior staff and patient comfort with no harsh chemical fumes or odors. Durable, low-linting wipes are textured for greater strength. Excellent wetness provides greater surface coverage compared with competitor quat and quat-alcohol disinfectant wipes and assurance that treated surfaces will remain wet for the full contact time.
  • Convenient, Compatible Use: VersaSure wipes are ready-to-use, fast acting and compatible with a broad range of hard, non-porous surfaces found in healthcare settings. A variety of sizes, including multipurpose wipes in 85 and 150 count canisters and 30 count flat packs, and terminal wipes for everyday cleaning and disinfecting of large spaces, available in 110 count buckets and refill pouches, makes VersaSure convenient for both nurses and environmental services teams to use facility-wide.

“Not all disinfectants are created equal and many don’t have the optimal balance of attributes to meet users’ needs. For example, a conventional quat or alcohol-based product might offer good compatibility, but have limited kill claims or evaporate from surfaces before meeting the required contact time,” says Brian Thompson, department manager – R&D, Clorox Healthcare. “We believe healthcare facilities shouldn’t have to make those trade-offs and with VersaSure, they don’t. Our R&D teams refused to make compromises between efficacy, aesthetics, wetness and cleaning power, and today we are excited to offer a one-step, ‘use everywhere’ wipe with broad-spectrum efficacy healthcare facilities can trust.”

Building the Industry’s Most Innovative, Comprehensive Portfolio of Disinfecting Solutions

In the fight against infections, today’s healthcare facilities need proven solutions to kill a broad range of pathogens, from seasonal threats like influenza and deadly pathogens like Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), to community-associated MRSA and new threats posed by emerging viral pathogens. Clorox Healthcare offers the industry’s most robust portfolio of EPA-registered surface disinfectants in addition to advanced UV technology, as well as cleaning and odor removal products to provide healthcare facilities, nurses and EVS professionals with a comprehensive portfolio of best-in-class solutions to help reduce the risk of infections and keep patients, staff, visitors and the broader community safe.

Clorox Healthcare understands that safeguarding healthcare environments requires advanced and evolving solutions. VersaSure joins products like Clorox Healthcare® Fuzion Cleaner Disinfectant, a new type of bleach that combines disinfecting efficacy against tough-to-kill pathogens like C. difficile spores with broad surface compatibility,

Clorox Healthcare® Bleach Germicidal Wipes and Clorox Healthcare® Hydrogen Peroxide Cleaner Disinfectants in a class of ready-to-use disinfectants that are tough on pathogens and optimized for surface compatibility, aesthetics, ease-of-use and patient and staff comfort to enable broad use, promote compliance and enhance safety facility-wide.

“At Clorox Healthcare, we are constantly innovating and working to expand the depth and breadth of our industry-leading portfolio, both by pushing the envelope with new product development and constantly striving for improvement to ensure that the mainstay surface disinfectants healthcare facilities depend on continue to meet the highest standards of efficacy and evolving needs of real-world healthcare environments,” says Lynda Lurie, director – marketing, Clorox Healthcare. “The expansion of our portfolio with the launch of VersaSure, brings us one step closer to our goal of removing the environment from the infection prevention equation.”

About Clorox Healthcare
Building on a century-long legacy in cleaning and disinfecting, Clorox Healthcare offers a wide range of products to help stop the spread of infection in healthcare facilities. From comprehensive surface disinfection to advanced ultraviolet technology, we are committed to providing efficacious solutions to the healthcare community. For more information, visit www.CloroxHealthcare.com or follow @CloroxHealth on Twitter.

1Kills rotavirus in two minutes.

 

Clorox Healthcare logo (PRNewsFoto/Clorox Professional Products Co.)

i

SOURCE Clorox Healthcare

Read more at https://www.thecloroxcompany.com/release/#tHkDJjKXBYteXfXg.99

Edmond A. Hooker, MD, DrPH and Nancy Foster, VP, Quality and Patient Safety Policy, American Hospital Association Discuss the CMS 2019 Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) on ‘C.diff. Spores and More’ Radio on July 3rd

Listen in on Tuesday, July 3rd at 1:00 p.m. ET

C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network©

www.cdiffradio.com

Hosted by the C Diff Foundation   brought to you by VoiceAmerica and sponsored by Clorox Healthcare

Our guests Edmond A. Hooker, MD, DrPH and Nancy Foster, Vice President, Quality and Patient Safety Policy, American Hospital Association will be discussing the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,  CMS 2019 Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) proposed rule – which includes proposals to de-duplicate measures across the five hospital quality reporting programs.

This special live broadcast discussion will be about the CMS’ recent proposals for Healthcare-associated infection (HAI) measures and to provide facts that will bring forth a better understanding of the proposed rule.

Guest Information:

Eddie Hooker, MD, DrPH,  is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Services Administration at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio. He is also an Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Louisville and at Wright State University. His areas of expertise include emergency medicine, epidemiology, health-services management, and public health.

Dr. Hooker received his BS degree from Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia. He earned his MD degree from Eastern Virginia Medical School. He then completed his residency training in Emergency Medicine at the University of Louisville. As a full-time faculty member at the University of Louisville from 1991 until 1996, Dr. Hooker served as an Associate Professor and Director of Resident Research. He was very active in brain trauma and stroke research. Dr. Hooker most recently practiced emergency medicine at a private hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was active cardiac research.   Since 2005, Dr. Hooker has been teaching in the Department of Health Services Administration at Xavier University. In the spring of 2007, Dr. Hooker earned his Doctorate in Public Health from the University of Kentucky.

Dr. Hooker continues to be active in emergency medicine and public-health research. He has authored more than 20 publications in leading emergency-medicine journals, published many book chapters, and continues to have an active research agenda. Dr. Hooker serves as an editor for Emedicine, an online clinical knowledge base. He is the medical advisor for Indian Hill Schools.

……………..

Nancy Foster is the Vice President for Quality and Patient Safety Policy at the American Hospital Association. In this role, she provides advice to public policymakers on legislation and regulations intended to improve patient safety and quality in America’s hospitals. Foster is the AHA’s point person at the National Quality Forum, the Hospital Workgroup of the Measures Application Partnership, and is the liaison to the Joint Commission’s Board, and represents hospital perspectives at many national meetings.

Prior to joining the AHA, Foster was the Coordinator for Quality Activities at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). In this role, she was the principal staff person for the Quality Interagency Coordination Task Force, which brought Federal agencies with health care responsibilities together to coordinate their work and engage in projects to improve quality and safety. She also led the development of patient safety research agenda for AHRQ and managed a portfolio of quality and safety research grants in excess of $10 million.

She is a graduate of Princeton University and has completed graduate work at Chapman University and Johns Hopkins University. In 2000, she was chosen as an Excellence in Government Leadership Fellow.

C. diff. Spores and More ™“ spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the
C. diff.
community and more.

Through their interviews, the C Diff Foundation mission will connect, educate, and empower listeners worldwide.

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

healthwellnesshealth (2)

  • This live broadcast will be archived in the ‘C.diff. Spores and More’ library and can be easily accessed at your leisure.   www.cdiffradio.com