Category Archives: EPA Registered C. diff kill cleaning products: Environmental Safety

U.S. Food and Drug Administration Released Notice For Hospital Mattress Safety

Health care facilities everywhere have been ramping up their disinfection practices in order to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. However, when it comes to hospital mattresses, one of the biggest vectors for spreading deadly bugs, efforts are still falling short.

With health care workers using chemicals that are intended for dry surfaces, the mattresses are harboring pathogens such as Clostridium difficile (C. diff), and, as Edmond A. Hooker, MD, DrPH, professor in the Department of Health Administration at Xavier University, pointed out at the 5th Annual International C. diff Awareness & Health Expo, regulatory agencies seem to have “turned a blind eye” to the issue.

Until now.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently released a notice on how to keep hospital mattress covers safe.

In this notice, the FDA notes safety concerns regarding hospital mattress covers, particularly that over time they can “wear out and allow blood and body fluids to penetrate and get trapped inside mattresses.” They added, “If blood or body fluids from one patient penetrate and get absorbed in a mattress, the fluids can leak out the next time the mattress is used.” If that happens, the next patient runs the risk of coming into contact with these fluids, and thus, becoming infected with pathogens from the bed’s previous occupants.

The FDA reports that this is not the first time they acknowledged these concerns; they released a safety communication in 2013 to make health care workers aware of the issue. However, the problem of contaminated hospital mattresses persists.

“There is no question there has been report after report after report of, ‘We had this outbreak. We killed all these people.’ There was just a report that came out on 18 people who were sick in a French hospital; they were on beds manufactured here in America, and 4 people were killed before they finally realized that it was the mattresses. They took all of the mattresses out of service and stopped the outbreak,” Dr. Hooker told Contagion ® in an exclusive interview.

“There’s a reason that it’s an under reported problem; hospitals don’t want to say, ‘Hey, we just killed a bunch of people. We kill 29,000 people a year with C. difficile infections. Do you hear that? I mean, that’s like crashing a plane every day and we do nothing about it. We just act like it didn’t happen.”

In an effort to address the issue, the FDA has released recommendations based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for environmental infection control in health care facilities; they include:

  1. Develop an inspection plan for all hospital mattresses and mattress covers in the facility. Learn the time of life for all mattresses/mattress covers by checking the manufacturer’s guidelines; follow any other recommendations that the manufacturers list. If you have any additional questions, contact the mattress manufacturer.
  2. Inspect each hospital mattress for visible signs of damage, which can include: cuts, tears, cracks, pinholes, snags, or stains. On a routine basis, remove mattress covers and check the inside. With the cover removed, check the mattress for wet spots, staining, or other signs of damage. Be sure to check all sides of the mattress as well as underneath. You will not be able to effectively inspect the mattress with the cover on.
  3. Remove any mattresses that are damaged, appear worn, or are visibly stained and immediately replace any mattress covers that are damaged.
  4. Maintain your mattresses and mattress covers by cleaning and disinfecting them “according to the manufacturer’s guidelines.” DO NOT stick needles into the hospital mattress through the cover, the FDA stresses.

“The FDA notice about mattress failures is an important first step. However, much more needs to be done. Most failures are not being reported to FDA, and the 700 reports that they have represents an industry-wide problem. Up to one-third of hospital mattresses currently in service in hospitals have failed. Also, the ones that have not failed are not being cleaned,”

Dr. Hooker stressed to Contagion ® in a follow-up interview. “These mattresses quickly get fissures and microscopic cracks that allow bacteria to remain on the surface during terminal cleaning. The next patient is then exposed to those bacteria and gets a hospital-acquired infection. The CDC needs to mandate better cleaning practices nationwide, which they can do.

The CDC needs to also mandate inspection of every mattress after every patient. Damaged mattresses should be removed from service immediately.”

 

To review the article in its entirety, please click on the link below to be re-directed:

http://www.contagionlive.com/news/fda-acknowledges-hospital-mattresses-as-hotbed-for-germs-releases-recommendations

C Diff Foundation and C diff Survivors Alliance Network Share a Winter 2017 Bulletin

Greetings from the main office of the C Diff Foundation and the C diff Survivors Alliance Network located in New Port Richey, Florida.  As we close 2017 we mark the 5th anniversary of the two organizations. We want to share with you a summary and reflection on this year’s events and campaigns moving our mission forward and message delivered worldwide. The mission and promoting C.diff. Awareness has been shared this year with  listeners in over 25 Counties during Season III on C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network (www.cdiffradio.com),  5,000+ visitors during global events, 9,600+ residents and business owners throughout villages and communities by our dedicated volunteer patient advocates, to over 1,000 clinicians who received up-to-date data expanding their knowledge during workshops and local symposiums offered worldwide, 3,000+ incoming calls received through the Nationwide Hot-Line 1-844-FOR-CDIF with the thousands of e-mails received seeking assistance.

After each event, workshop, meeting, introduction we thank the individuals for sharing  in five years of opportunity to provide life-saving data educating and advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety and support worldwide.  The mission of the C Diff Foundation is the momentum of charity that has proven effective and grown over the past five years.  A single act of charity grows into more and greater charity worldwide.  The work each member of the C Diff Foundation, with hundreds of Volunteer Patient Advocates, promote the Foundation’s mission which never stops with a single act.  Instead, it builds, it grows, and it expands into an exponential impact of good in the world helping to save lives.  We thank you for your continued support and encourage you to continue your journey, proposing three verbs important to the C Diff Foundation and the C diff Survivors Alliance Network in general.

The first of these verbs is “to promote” C.diff. Awareness. It is the first step that opens doors in educating individuals, clinicians, communities in learning more about this life-threatening infection which causes a great amount of pain and suffering around the globe.  It is essential and it is the compass in reaching shared goals.

The second verb is “to heighten awareness” across the nation to continue proclaiming November Clostridium difficile infection awareness month. The Governors proclaimed November C. difficile (C.diff) infection awareness month in 2017 and we encourage them “to welcome” this proclamation in 2018 with more than a yearly executive order of greeting or inviting their residents to take notice.  We look forward to working with delegates, with your support, to make this proclamation statement nationwide and welcome the importance of the time, education, programs, and agenda in place addressing this life-threatening infection.  The C Diff Foundation advocates and supports the individuals and families suffering during and after being treated for a C. diff. infection.

Finally, the third verb that the C Diff Foundation and C diff Survivors Alliance Network propose is “to go.”  Here we are all challenged to do something big or small — with what we are able to do.  With the unity of members with volunteers with patients, families, and clinicians we can make a difference with enthusiasm and simplicity to get up and go.  We can do for others  today what we could not do for ourselves during our time of illnesses, during the long periods of isolation, during the losses, and during the pain and suffering.

As members of the C Diff Foundation we know that our enthusiasm  for our mission is the desire to bring awareness and promote C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety and support worldwide.  We witness changes by the data and information being delivered within villages,  through major cities and in small communities — it is only by taking this path that we gain satisfaction knowing that the news delivered with enthusiasm “to promote, to heighten awareness and to go” with the members and volunteers in the C Diff Foundation and C diff Survivors Alliance Network creates positive results.

We are truly grateful for your continued dedication, efforts and support and thank you again for making this year’s November anniversary such a special occasion through the growth and advances made worldwide.   Let’s carry the mission into the New Year, carving new paths to witness the decline of newly diagnosed cases of Clostridium difficile (C.diff., C. difficile) infections and saving lives worldwide.

“None of us can do this alone ~ All of us can do this together.”

 

 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Announced Methods and Guidance for Evaluating Efficacy of Antimicrobial Products against Clostridium difficile Spores

 

On September 29, 2017, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the availability of two final test method Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) for evaluating the efficacy of antimicrobial products against  Clostridium difficile (C. diff) spores.

EPA also released regulatory guidance for test criteria and pesticide claims for these products, specifically “Methods and Guidance for Testing the Efficacy of Antimicrobial Products Against Spores of Clostridium difficile on Hard Non-Porous Surfaces.”  These test methods and guidance provide a framework for registrants who seek to make a claim for antimicrobial pesticide products to control these spores on hard, non-porous surfaces.

C. diff is an anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium and a  leading hospital-acquired infection.  The spores survive on hard surfaces such as glass, metals, and plastics that are commonly found in health-care settings.

Antimicrobial pesticides are used to reduce the number of spores on environmental surfaces.  Under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), the registrant of an antimicrobial product with a public health claim is required to submit efficacy data to EPA in support of the product’s registration.

EPA MLB SOP MB-28 describes the test methodology for producing and storing standardized spore suspensions of C. diff based on ASTM E2839, Standard Test Method for Production of C. difficile Spores for Use in Efficacy Evaluation of Antimicrobial Agents (ASTM International).  A spore suspension should be developed and qualified according to EPA MLB SOP MB-28 before an efficacy evaluation can be performed using method EPA MLB SOP MB-31.  EPA MLB SOP MB-31 describes a quantitative method intended for evaluating the sporicidal efficacy of liquid disinfectants against spores of C. diff on inanimate, hard, non-porous surfaces.

EPA solicited comments on the clarity of the test method SOPs and the regulatory guidance in December 2016.  EPA received comments from twelve entities and revised the drafts to incorporate suggested changes.  EPA posted its response to those comments in Docket No. EPA-HQ-OPP-2016-0753-0026.  EPA also is working with ASTM International, a standard-setting organization, on adoption of these test methods as official ASTM standards.

EPA’s response to comments and other documents associated with this action are available in Docket No. EPA-HQ-OPP-2016-0753 at www.regulations.gov

The methods and guidance also are found on EPA’s Antimicrobial Testing Methods & Procedures Developed by EPA’s Microbiology Laboratory webpage, at the Methods tab as Method IDs MB-28 and MB-31, and at the Guidance tab as Sporicidal Claims Against Clostridium difficile.

 

Source:  https://www.natlawreview.com/article/methods-and-guidance-testing-efficacy-antimicrobials-against-spores-clostridium

4 Year Sepsis Study of New York’s Sepsis Regulations Being Launched By University of Pittsburgh Researcher

A University of Pittsburgh researcher is launching a four-year study of New York’s sepsis regulations to see what worked and what didn’t in the state’s fight against one of health care’s biggest killers.

Research has shown that speeding up sepsis treatment, which New York’s law accomplished, reduces deaths from the condition . The new study will examine the law more broadly, probing whether it might have had unintended negative consequences.

“Just because the protocol is good doesn’t mean that a regulatory-based effort to force hospitals to adopt these protocols led to better outcomes,” said Dr. Jeremy Kahn, a Pitt professor of critical care medicine and health policy and management who is heading the $1.5 million study.

New York required hospitals to adopt time-based sepsis protocols in 2013 after a 12-year-old boy, Rory Staunton, died from the condition after cutting his arm in a gym class a year earlier. The condition, in which the body’s immune system overreacts to infection, contributes to as many as half of all hospital deaths, according to the National Institutes of Health.

Sepsis has been likened to heart attacks and strokes, which killed many more patients before evidence-based treatment protocols were adopted. Hospitals in most states aren’t required to do anything specific to treat the condition, although many have voluntarily adopted protocols. Pennsylvania Health Department officials have said they plan to launch a two-year process this fall to incorporate sepsis protocols in the state’s hospital regulations.

New York’s protocols include taking blood cultures to guide diagnosis and treatment, analyzing lactate levels that can signify septic shock and administering fluids and antibiotics.

Kahn said the protocols raise concerns over two primary dangers: overuse of antibiotics and overuse of fluids.

The study of New York’s three-hour protocols found that administering fluids didn’t appear to improve outcomes, and too much fluid can lead to harm, Kahn said. Antibiotics, while a critical part of sepsis treatment, can also harm patients by killing good bacteria in the gut and creating a more welcoming environment for a deadly infection known as C-diff.

The new study, funded by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, will examine complications, length of hospital stays, costs and other elements of the protocols, Kahn said. The study will compare sepsis treatment outcomes in New York to outcomes in Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Washington and Florida, he said — states with similar numbers and types of hospitals.

“The hope would be to help policymakers in other states, specifically in Pennsylvania, as they design these regulations,” he said.

He expects bigger hospitals with more resources will have better sepsis outcomes than smaller rural hospitals. Another factor that might influence outcomes is whether hospitals have a designated sepsis specialist who influences how hospitals approach the condition.

Researchers plan to study the effects of sepsis policies for the first two years — delivering early results to Harrisburg before the planned update to hospital regulations — and to spend another two years interviewing doctors and health care specialists to gather more detail about how the protocols work.

“We can’t stand by as hundreds of thousands of Americans are dying each year of sepsis,” Kahn said. “But the question is, can we craft those policies; can the policy response to sepsis be evidence-based?”

The C Diff Foundation Appreciates Your Support And As Easy As a Mouse Click When You Shop Amazon Smile

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Join us in our dedicated fight against C. diff. and help us continue our mission of educating, and advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety and saving lives worldwide

 

 

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Xenex Disinfection Services’ LightStrike™ Robot With Pulsed Xenon Ultraviolet-C (UV-C) Light Technology Introduces Its LightStrike Disinfection Pod

The scientific evidence has clearly established that in the hospital environment, microorganisms such as Clostridium difficile (C.diff), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are responsible for the infections that kill nearly 300
people in the U.S. every day.

Xenex Disinfection Services’ LightStrike™ Robot with pulsed xenon ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light technology is a proven solution that quickly destroys deadly viruses, bacteria and spores before they pose a threat to patients and healthcare workers. LightStrike Robots help healthcare facilities reduce their HAI rates by destroying the microscopic germs that may be missed during the manual cleaning process. Xenex robots use pulsed xenon, a noble gas, to create Full Spectrum™, high intensity UV light that quickly destroys infectious germs in less than five minutes. Hospitals using Xenex devices have published clinical outcome studies in peer-reviewed journals showing 50-100 percent reductions in C.diff, MRSA and Surgical Site Infection rates when those hospitals used LightStrike Robots to disinfect rooms.

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Now, for the first time, hospitals can utilize the power of

LightStrike Germ-Zapping Robots™ to quickly disinfect mobile equipment just as effectively as they disinfect rooms within their facility. Pathogens like C.diff, Acinetobacter baumannii, MRSA and Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) can travel throughout a healthcare facility on mobile equipment.

To address this gap in the infection control process, Xenex recently partnered with an industry leader in containment units, Mintie Technologies, Inc., to create the LightStrike Disinfection Pod.

Designed to quickly disinfect reusable mobile equipment such as isolettes, ventilators, pressure monitors, wheelchairs and workstations, the

LightStrike Disinfection Pod enables the power of the LightStrike Robot’s intense, germicidal light to be used anywhere in a facility.
The Pod is collapsible, mobile and can be positioned in a hospital hallway or other areas without disrupting or impeding daily workflow. Its proprietary design integrates reflective interior fabric ensuring 360 degrees of UV light coverage over difficult-to-clean equipment including anesthesia carts, ventilators, and mobile imaging machines.

To access and read the article in its entirety please click on the link below:

https://www.dotmed.com/news/story/37771

June 2017 Newsletter

JUNE 2017 – NEWSLETTER

 


5th Annual International C. diff. Awareness

Conference & Health EXPO Updates

Welcome to the 5th Annual International C.diff. Awareness Conference & Health EXPO  second update.  The Conference & Health EXPO begins on November 9th at 8:00 a.m. and concludes on November 10th at 3:00 p.m. There are over twenty guest speakers, leading topic experts, sharing up-to-date data with an audience of health care professionals from a variety of management levels and specialties, medical educators, medical students, and professionals with shared interests. The venue is the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) Thomas and Mack Center in conjunction with the Embassy Suites Convention Center where staff and event coordinators are working together to create this amazing event.  Embassy Suite Convention Center hotel accommodations are now at a “limited availability.”  Please utilize the hotel reservation portal available on the conference page
We are truly grateful for the following Corporations and Sponsors of this educational conference, also exhibiting.
An educational grant has been awarded to the C Diff Foundation by
Sanofi Pasteur USA.  It is through their continued support that this event is made possible:
DIAMOND SPONSOR
Synthetic Biologics
GOLD SPONSORS
Roche
Clorox Healthcare
Rebiotix
Nestle Health Science
Seres Therapeutics
Xenex
SILVER SPONSORS
Tru-D
Surfacide
SporeGen
EDM – Environmental Disinfection Management
ADDITIONAL EXHIBITORS
Contagion Live
Just Ask Where Concierge
Safety Net
www.cdiffradio.com
Live Broadcasts on Tuesdays at:   
10a PT,    11a MT,   12p CT,    1p ET 
June 6th :   Global Sepsis Alliance
June 13th:   Kristopher Maday, PA
June 20th:   Home Care and C. diff.
June 27th:   Advocating In Healthcare

Baking For C.diff. Awareness

Volunteer Patient Advocates, with the
C Diff Foundation Members,  were busy in the kitchens baking across the globe to support our mission and provide education at each event.
We kicked off the month long chain of events with a successful recipe to educate and advocate for
C. difficile infection awareness worldwide.  More than 700 brochures were shared at the bake sales meeting  the goal –  promoting C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety and support across the globe during the month long campaign.  Thank You to everyone involved making this campaign a global success.

Save the Date

On September 14th a day to  Honor the Professionals Dedicated to Clostridium difficile Research and Development. Their Efforts Bring Forth New Concepts, New Theories, and the Progress Towards A Better Understanding – Pursuing Future Developments In Clostridium difficile           (a.k.a., C.diffiicle, C.diff.).
September 14th,   8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.,m. ET
This free, live webinar by C.diff. Science, is to honor Professionals in the Science community, leading the way advancing C. difficile Infection Prevention, Treatments, and Environmental Safety Products worldwide  –  hosted by the C Diff Foundation –  a slate of industry leaders and medical researchers — from highly regarded health systems — share their journeys and efforts focused on Clostridium difficile research and development that will be appreciated by colleagues, fellow-researchers, and the scientific teams within organizations.
 
Visit cdiffscience.org To View the Guest Speakers, Presentation Topics.
Register For This One Day Educational Event and Don’t Forget To Share the News.
June  9     Scott Battles: C. diff. Q & A
June 15    Karen Factor,RD, Nutrition
June 19    Lisa Hurka-Covington, Anxiety
June 20    Roy Poole, CO  C. diff. Q & A
June 26    Dr.Oneto,MD  and
                 Dr.Feuerstadt,MD
                 C. diff. – The What,Where,How.
                   Sign up today
Where Support Is Just a Phone Call Away ♥ 

Support and information sessions are for everyone especially for —

  • Patients and their Families.
  • Clinicians,
  • C. diff. survivors continuing their recovery from a prolonged illness.
  • Patients working their way through any long-term wellness draining diagnosis.
Sessions are accessible from the USA and
57 Countries

Connect with others being treated for and recovering from a C.diff. Infection.

Ask questions, get advice & support.
Sign up FREE

www.cdifffoundation.org/support/

Treasure Island, FL Community EXPO Promoting

 C.diff. Awareness

It was a pleasure joining the local residents of Treasure Island, Florida on May 18th.  Educating and Advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety, a shared goal to witness a decline in newly diagnosed
C. diff. cases worldwide.  To view upcoming events of interest, please visit www.cdifffoundation.org/events-of-interest/
“None of us can do this alone, all of us can do this together.” 
C Diff Foundation
6931 ian Ct  #14
New Port Richey, FL 34653
(919) 201-1512
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