Category Archives: EPA Registered C. diff kill cleaning products: Environmental Safety

UV-C Disinfecting Takes Its Place At Thompson Hospital and the M.M. Ewing Continuing Care Center in New York State

 

UV Disinfecting

Accomplished by using  short-wave
ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light as a germicidal to destroy viruses, bacteria and other pathogens that can linger on surfaces and hide in shadows.

One piece of equipmnet can disinfect an average-sized patient room in about 8 minutes and is deployed after a room is sanitized with standard techniques and cleaning products.

In  Canandaigua, New York  a nearly 6 foot tall and wielding 20 vertical fluorescent bulbs, the R-D Rapid Disinfector robot is a formidable fighter in the war against germs.

This UV disinfecting robot is The R-D Rapid Disinfector — developed by a Rochester, New York  firm, Steriliz LLC, and is manufactured locally.

Thompson Hospital and the M.M. Ewing Continuing Care Center have begun using this automated disinfecting machine throughout the institutions to help reduce the risks of illness and infections for patients, residents, visitors and staff.

The Disinfector uses short-wave ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light as a germicidal to destroy viruses, bacteria and other pathogens that can linger on surfaces and hide in shadows. This machine can disinfect an average-sized patient room in about 8 minutes and is deployed after a room is sanitized with standard techniques. It is remotely controlled by an associate from Environmental Services.

The UV-C light fills the entire room, reaching and disinfecting areas that human hands might miss. No one is allowed inside the room when the lights are working. This no-touch cleaning system gets rid of some of the most dangerous and difficult-to-destroy bacteria, including Clostridium difficile (C. diff). Disinfectants work on the surface of non-living objects by destroying the cell wall of harmful microbes or interfering with their metabolism.

“This technology, added on to normal, regular, manual environmental cleaning, gives me a sense of ease that we are doing all we can to keep our environment clean and our patients safe,” said Thompson Health Director of Infection Prevention Michelle Vignari. “We are just now starting to see published literature supporting that the addition of UV-C technology in hospitals actually does correlate with a reduction of healthcare-acquired infections.”

This state-of-the-art robot monitors the entire disinfection process. Wireless sensors measure, record and report on UV-C light dosages delivered to specific areas in real time. The machine can be paused and repositioned to maximize efficiency, including targeting shadowed areas. The Disinfector shuts off automatically once the sensors indicate that enough UV-C light has been emitted to kill the germs.

“In a day of delivering high-reliability care, I felt very strongly that we needed a technology that we could measure and evaluate its performance,” Vignari said.

Hospital staff like the Disinfector too.

“It is pretty simple to use and seems to be working great,” said Stephanie Fowler of Environmental Services, who activates the robot after a room is cleaned with traditional methods.

The R-D Rapid Disinfector was developed by a Rochester firm, Steriliz LLC, and is manufactured locally. The Disinfector uniquely provides FDA-patented wireless sensors to measure the amount of UV-C light delivered to an area and real-time online data access and reports. Since being tried in four Rochester hospitals in 2011, several hundred of these Disinfectors are now being used in hospitals, care homes, disaster centers and government installations worldwide.

Steriliz is recognized as a world leader in UV-C disinfection.

“Improving the health and safety of patients is a blessed opportunity,” said CEO and President Sam Trapani. “The potential market for the company’s product is large and we are experiencing a high growth curve.”

To read the article in its entirety please click on the link below:

http://www.mpnnow.com/news/20170318/robot-destroys-germs-with-power-of-light

Member of St. Joseph Hoag Health Network – Mission Hospital Laguna Beach, CA Adds a UV Disinfection Robot To Protect Against the Spread of Infections

6th Graders Receive Up Close and Personal Education with a Light-Pulsing, Disinfecting Robot

Sharing and Educating

Opening eyes of the young with disinfecting

technology being utilized to combat “superbugs.”

 

The only robot in the Verdugo region that zaps away unwanted bacteria and viruses from hospital rooms arrived at USC-Verdugo Hills Hospital two weeks ago.

The Xenex robot emits a pulsating, bright white UV-C light — which is a short, wavelength, ultraviolet light that can save lives. Once surfaces are exposed to the robot’s rays, harmful bacteria and viruses die, greatly reducing the odds patients will be infected with hospital-acquired infections, including those caused by superbugs such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, known as MRSA.

USC-Verdugo Hills Hospital employees joined Xenex employees at Fremont Elementary School, where they showcased the $100,000 machine in teacher Mallory Kane’s sixth-grade classroom, the same place where Keith Hobbs, chief executive of Verdugo Hills Hospital, was a sixth-grader in 1979. “There’s no other place that I would rather be than to come back to my alma mater and share this R2D2, bug-zapping machine with you guys,” Hobbs said.

The Xenex robot pulses UV-C light 67 times per second, and hospital staff take precautions when they operate it because the light can harm their eyes.

“This is not any light bulb in your house,” said Mary Virgallito, director of patient safety for the hospital. “It’s actually filled with a gas called xenon.”

Virgallito said hospital employees manually clean rooms before they activate Xenex. It takes the robot about 15 minutes to clean a patient’s room, and 20 minutes to disinfect an operating room.Hobbs said mothers ask if they can borrow the robot to disinfect their own homes, and Kane suggested it would be helpful in the classroom. Over the past several weeks, many of her students missed school because they were sick.

Jeff Mamalakis, business development manager for Xenex, volunteered to disinfect Kane’s room when school let out. The space would be left with a scent as if lightning had just struck, Virgallito said.  The impromptu high-tech, germ-cleansing session was a dream come true for Kane.

“In sixth grade, the curriculum moves so quickly that even missing one day puts kids so far behind,” Kane said. “Having our classroom disinfected every day would be a dream come true. My kids would be here, everyone would be happy, no one would have to miss school.”

To Read the article in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/uhc-most-xenex-germ-zapping-144500378.html;_ylt=A0LEV18lQNBY2KgA6FZXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTEzMXBobHNmBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDVUkwMkM0XzEEc2VjA3Nj

Clorox Healthcare Enhancements to Bleach Germicidal Disinfectants Announced

NewsSpeaker

In the fight against healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs), today’s healthcare facilities need proven solutions to kill a broad range of infection-causing pathogens, from deadly hospital pathogens like Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) to new threats posed by emerging viral pathogens.

To ensure its disinfectants continue to meet the highest standards of efficacy, Clorox Healthcare voluntarily tested two of its leading ready-to-use bleach disinfectants using updated U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommended standards, which raise the bar for sporicidal disinfectant efficacy.

February 28th, 2017 Clorox Healthcare announced that Clorox Healthcare® Bleach Germicidal Wipes and Clorox Healthcare® Bleach Germicidal Cleaners are now EPA-registered to kill C. difficile spores in three minutes, tested in the presence of a three-part organic soil load,[1] and have gained new disinfection claims for emerging viral pathogens including SARS-associated Coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-associated Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and other common causes of HAIs.

…………………………..>>>>>>

http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/news/2017/02/clorox-healthcare-announces-enhancements-to-bleach-germicidal-disinfectants.aspx

“At Clorox Healthcare, we are dedicated to safeguarding patient environments and continuously strive to ensure our surface disinfectants meet the needs of the ever-changing healthcare environment,” says Lynda Lurie, Director – Marketing, Clorox Healthcare. “We made these changes proactively so that healthcare professionals can be prepared for whatever comes through their doors, wherever care is delivered.”

…………………….

The new testing standards create a higher challenge for sporicidal disinfectant efficacy. Through voluntary testing, Clorox Healthcare Bleach Germicidal disinfectants have been able to maintain, and in some cases improve, contact times, killing 99.9999 percent of C. difficile spores – the EPA’s required threshold for efficacy – within three minutes, even in the presence of the three-part organic soil load.

[1] Follow special instructions for cleaning prior to disinfection.
[2] Assiri, A, et al. “Hospital Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus.” N Engl J Med 2013; 369:407-416. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1306742#t=article.
[3] Chowell, G, et al. “Transmission Characteristics of MERS and SARS in the Healthcare Setting: a Comparative Study.” BMC Medicine 2015;13:210. https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-015-0450-0.
[4] “List of Pathogens.” World Health Organization. http://www.who.int/csr/research-and-development/list_of_pathogens/en/. (Accessed Feb. 8, 2017).
[5] Otter, JA et al. “Transmission of SARS and MERS Coronaviruses and Influenza Virus in Healthcare Settings: the Possible Role of Dry Surface Contamination.” J. Hosp. Infect. 2016, 92 (3), 235–250.
[6] “Influenza (Flu) Viruses.” U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/viruses/index.htm. (Accessed Feb. 8, 2017).
[7] Saint, S, et al. “Clostridium difficile Infection in the United States: A National Study Assessing Preventive Practices Used and Perceptions of Practice Evidence.” Infect. Con¬trol Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;36.8:969–971.
[8] “Hospital Value-Based Purchasing.” Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Quality-Initiatives-Patient-Assessment-Instruments/hos¬pital-value-based-purchasing. (Accessed Feb. 8, 2017).
[9] “Guidance for the Efficacy Evaluation of Products with Sporicidal Claims Against Clostridium difficile (June 2014).” U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/guidance-efficacy-evaluation-products-sporicidal-claims-against-clostridium#main-content. (Accessed Feb. 8, 2017).

Source: Clorox Healthcare

To read article in its entirety click on the link below:

http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/news/2017/02/clorox-healthcare-announces-enhancements-to-bleach-germicidal-disinfectants.aspx

*PLEASE NOTE – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse any products and/or clinical study in progress. All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only.

 

 

Reviewing the Benefits Of Enhanced Terminal Room (BETR-D) Disinfection Study, C.difficile Infection Rates Unchanged

c-diff

If you are concerned about C. difficile Infections being battled in Hospitals today review the Abstract and Scientific evidence from the 2015  BETR-D Study

“….adding UV light to bleach in rooms linked to C. difficile had no effect, ” Dr. Deverick J. Anderson, MD, MPH, FIDSA, FSHEA reported

 

MedPage Today  http://www.medpagetoday.com/meetingcoverage/idweek/54043

Adding ultraviolet light or bleach plus UV light also showed a trend toward a reduced risk, Anderson said at the IDWeek meeting, held in 2015 jointly by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA), the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS).

On the other hand, the benefit of what Anderson called “enhanced terminal disinfection” varied among the four pathogens, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE), multidrug-resistant (MDR) acetinobacter, and Clostridium difficile.

   What was the BETR-D Study?

The BETR-Disinfection study was performed over 28 months in 9 study hospitals from 4/2012 to 7/2014.

  • Each hospital used four strategies for terminal room disinfection in a randomized sequence.
  • Each strategy was used for 7-month study arms, including a 1 month wash-in period.
  • Two of these strategies used a UV-C emitting device.
  • Standard cleaning involved the use of a quaternary ammonium (reference group A). Three enhanced cleaning strategies were evaluated and compared to the reference: quaternary ammonium + UV-C (B), bleach (C), and bleach + UV-C (D).Of  note, bleach was used for daily and terminal disinfection of all known C. difficile rooms, regardless of study arm.
  • Study cleaning strategies were employed in seed rooms, defined as a room containing a patient on contact precautions for infection or colonization due to the following 4 target MDROs was discharged: MRSA, VRE, C. difficile, or MDR Acinetobacter.
  • The next patient in the room was considered an exposed patient.
  • Primary outcome was the clinical incidence of all target MDROs in patients exposed for at least 24 hours, defined as the first positive culture of a MDRO a) during exposure to the seed room, if positivity occurred ≥48 hr post-admission to the seed room, or b) in the 90 days following seed room exposure for MRSA, VRE, and MDR-Acinetobacter and 28 days for C. difficile.
  • Rates were calculated as outcome/10,000 exposure days using intention-to-treat and per protocol principles

To read the study Abstract in its entirety please click on the following link:

https://idsa.confex.com/idsa/2015/webprogram/Paper53062.html

A study of a large cluster-randomized trial, adding bleach to the standard quaternary ammonium cleaning significantly reduced the risk of transmission of four organisms that cause healthcare-associated infections

A Cluster Randomized, Multicenter Crossover Study with 2×2 Factorial Design to Evaluate the Impact of Enhanced Terminal Room Disinfection on Acquisition and Infection Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Organisms (MDRO)

Anderson and colleagues in the Duke Infection Control Outreach Network tested the four cleaning strategies over 28 months in nine hospitals, with hospitals switching strategies every 7 months.

The goal was to see if they could reduce the overall incidence of the targeted pathogens among patients using a room immediately after a patient known to be colonized or infected by one of the four occupied it. A second primary endpoint was the effect on C. difficile.

He noted that all rooms in which a patient had had C. difficile were cleaned with bleach, so the comparisons were actually between quaternary ammonium and bleach and the same approach adding UV light.

All told, the study had 23,272 patients potentially exposed to a pathogen — they spent at least 24 hours in one of the “seed” rooms where the previous patient had been identified as having one of the pathogens.

Patients in seed rooms became cases if they developed colonization or infection by the pathogens linked to their rooms, as long as they had no history of the pathogen in the previous year and no evidence of community acquisition, he said.

In the four arms, Anderson reported:

  • There were 115 cases in 22,426 exposure days in the standard cleaning arm, for a rate of 51.3 cases per 10,000 exposure days.
  • In the arm adding ultraviolet, there were 76 cases in 22,389 exposure days for a rate of 33.9
  • When bleach was added, there were 101 cases in 24,261 exposure days, for a rate of 41.6.
  • And when both bleach and UV were added, there were 131 cases in 28,757 exposure days, for a rate of 45.6.

The reductions, compared with standard cleaning, were 30%, 15% and 9%, respectively, but only the addition of UV light to quaternary ammonium reached statistical significance (P=0.036).

There were too few cases of MDR acetinobacter to quantify, he said, but it was possible to judge the effect of the various interventions on the other three pathogens.

For MRSA, adding UV light to quaternary ammonium reduced the risk of transmission by 22%, but the difference from standard cleaning fell short of statistical significance. The other two interventions made no difference.

For VRE, on the other hand, all three test strategies reduced the risk of transmission by about 60% — 59% for UV, 57% for bleach, and 64% for bleach plus UV. However, Anderson said, the UV arm was just short of statistical significance, while the other two were significantly different from standard cleaning (P=0.049 and P=0.003, respectively).

But adding UV light to bleach in rooms linked to C. difficile had no effect, Anderson reported.

Note: Not all UV disinfecting products are the same– in the way they are scientifically developed, manufactured, and utilized in the healthcare industry.  It is favorable for Hospital and Healthcare facility decision-makers to ask some tough questions when it comes to evaluating UV technologies. The gold standard for assessing new technologies is to evaluate peer-reviewed literature published and also cited in The Lancet publication.  Please click on the The Lancet article link below to retrieve additional information focused on the BETR-D study.

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(16)31588-4/abstract

Findings

31 226 patients were exposed; 21 395 (69%) met all inclusion criteria, including 4916 in the reference group, 5178 in the UV group, 5438 in the bleach group, and 5863 in the bleach and UV group. 115 patients had the primary outcome during 22 426 exposure days in the reference group (51·3 per 10 000 exposure days). The incidence of target organisms among exposed patients was significantly lower after adding UV to standard cleaning strategies (n=76; 33·9 cases per 10 000 exposure days; relative risk [RR] 0·70, 95% CI 0·50–0·98; p=0·036). The primary outcome was not statistically lower with bleach (n=101; 41·6 cases per 10 000 exposure days; RR 0·85, 95% CI 0·69–1·04; p=0·116), or bleach and UV (n=131; 45·6 cases per 10 000 exposure days; RR 0·91, 95% CI 0·76–1·09; p=0·303) among exposed patients. Similarly, the incidence of C difficile infection among exposed patients was not changed after adding UV to cleaning with bleach (n=38 vs 36; 30·4 cases vs 31·6 cases per 10 000 exposure days; RR 1·0, 95% CI 0·57–1·75; p=0·997).

The BETR-D study was supported by the CDC

 

Cdiffradio.com

Cdiffradio.com

 

 

 

Listen to Deverick J. Anderson, MD, MPH, FIDSA, FSHEA discuss UV Intervention Addressing C. difficile and Other Pathogens   July 2016

https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/94128/uv-intervention-addressing-c-difficile-and-other-pathogens

 

 

*PLEASE NOTE – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse any products, medications,  and/or clinical study in progress. All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only.

 

C. diff. Solution Tablets by 3M™ – EPA Registered To Kill C.diff. Spores In 4 Minutes

On November 21, 2016  3M™  shared a press release introducing the

C.diff. Solution Tablets – EPA Registered to Kill C.diff. Spores in 4 minutes.

Jean Parsons [#Beginning of Shooting Data Section] Image Size:L (7360 x 4912), FX 2016/09/20 13:49:04.33 Time Zone and Date:UTC-6, DST:ON Tiff-RGB (8-bit) Nikon D810 Lens:VR 24-70mm f/2.8E Focal Length:70mm Focus Mode:Manual AF-Area Mode:Single VR:ON AF Fine Tune:OFF Aperture:f/22 Shutter Speed:1/160s Exposure Mode:Manual Exposure Comp.:-0.7EV Exposure Tuning: Metering:Matrix ISO Sensitivity:ISO 200 Device: White Balance:Direct sunlight, 0, 0 Color Space:sRGB High ISO NR:ON (Normal) Long Exposure NR:OFF Active D-Lighting:Auto Image Authentication: Vignette Control:Normal Auto Distortion Control:OFF Picture Control:[VI] VIVID Base:[VI] VIVID Quick Adjust:0.00 Sharpening:4.00 Clarity:+1.00 Contrast:0.00 Brightness:0.00 Saturation:0.00 Hue:0.00 Filter Effects: Toning: Optimize Image: Color Mode: Tone Comp.: Hue Adjustment: Saturation: Sharpening: Latitude: Longitude: Altitude: Altitude Reference: Heading: UTC: Map Datum: [#End of Shooting Data Section]

When most people think of hospitals, they imagine a safe, clean environment where patients can comfortably receive treatments in an effort to get healthy. However, in reality, hospitals can pose potential risks to both patients and staff, through the threat of infections caused by pathogens such as MRSA, E. coli and C. difficile (C. diff.).

 

 

Remarkably, C. diff contributes to nearly 29,000 deaths every year – almost matching the number of deaths caused by influenza.[i] Despite the prevalence of this organism, prevention and containment pose numerous challenges as the spores can survive for weeks on a large variety of surfaces.

To combat the rise of C. diff infections at hospital facilities, 3M recently launched 3M™ C. diff Solution Tablets, providing a proven, effective alternative to bleach and peracetic acid disinfectants.

Now available for use in the U.S., the new product delivers on effectiveness, efficiency and value, by providing the following:

Effectiveness

  • EPA-registered to kill diff spores in four minutes
  • Effective against Norovirus
  • Safer than bleach and peracetic acid, featuring an NFPA rating of 0,0,0 with no personal protective equipment required at use dilution
  • In-use pH of 5.5 to 6.5, which is closer to neutral than bleach or peracetic acid

Efficiency

  • Dissolves in approximately three minutes with a mild chlorine smell
  • Tablets are available in two sizes for use in large and small containers
  • The product can be applied with a cloth, wipe, mop, or coarse trigger sprayer, and will not bind to common wiping media

Value

  • Costs significantly less than ready-to-use bleach
  • Yields a three-year shelf life in sealed packets, and seven-day shelf life when diluted and stored in a closed container

 

“We are excited to provide our customers with an effective solution for the battle against C. diff,” said Adrian Cook, product marketer for chemicals at 3M Commercial Solutions Division. “The reduction and prevention of infections is an important focus for our customers and we look forward to continuing our work in ensuring safe environments.”

In addition to the new product launch, 3M Commercial Solutions Division also announced the expansion of its Flow Control System product line through the introduction of four additional chemical offerings:

 

  • 3M™ Quat Disinfectant Cleaner Concentrate 5A
    EPA-registered disinfectant cleaner for use in hospitals. Kills HIV-1, MRSA, VRE, herpes simplex I and II and other pathogens. Rinse-free, pleasant fragrance. 0.5 gallon concentrate bottle yields 107 ready-to-use gallons. 4/case.

 

  • 3M™ Neutral Quat Disinfectant Cleaner Concentrate 23A
    EPA-registered disinfectant cleaner kills HIV-1, MRSA, VRE, herpes simplex I and II, and other pathogens. Rinse-free, low foaming, neutral pH formula. 0.5 gallon concentrate bottle yields 100 ready-to-use gallons. 4/case.

 

  • Scotchgard™ Pretreatment Cleaner Concentrate 28A
    Hard-working cleaner for heavily soiled areas of colorfast carpet. Use as a pre-spray prior to extraction or shampooing to loosen soils and stains. 0.5 gallon concentrate bottle yields 26 ready-to-use gallons. 4/case.

 

  • 3M™ Bathroom Cleaner Concentrate 44A
    Green Seal™ Certified bathroom cleaner. Removes soap scum and scale from bathroom surfaces. 0.5 gallon concentrate bottle yields 28 ready-to-use gallons. 4/case.

For more information about 3M™ C. diff Solution Tablets and the 3M Flow Control System, please visit www.3M.com/facility

###

3M Company.

All other trademarks listed herein are owned by their respective companies.

Source:  3M Company

 

*PLEASE NOTE – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse any products and/or clinical study in progress. All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only. Thank  you.

C. diff. Awareness Events Scheduled For November

cdiffawarenessribbon

SHOPPING:

Shop Amazon to support the many programs and educational workshops provided by the C Diff Foundation worldwide —

It’s a pleasure to share the new way to give to the C Diff Foundation.  Amazon will share a portion of the proceeds from your purchases with the  C Diff Foundation.  While you are shopping on-line you are also donating, and we are grateful.

Here is how it works:

* Shop Amazon through AmazonSmile     C Diff Foundation

Click on the link below to access the site

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/46-1272728

                        It is as easy as that!

Education:

http://globalcdifficilecongress.org/

The Global C. difficile Congress FREE Webinar will take place on November 11th at 8:00 a.m. Eastern Time will broaden existing knowledge surrounding C. difficile infection (CDI)  prevention, treatments, and environmental safety worldwide.  The drive and passion takes us forward in promoting the practical and technical advancements taking place across the globe.  Healthcare Professionals from every area of expertise, will discuss the control and  treatment options,  the healthcare perspectives, antibiotic-resistance stewardship programs, and much more to raise awareness and share successful implementations and guidelines.

The Global C. difficile Congress will be eight sessions presented by topic experts  – in four hours – in one day –  with goals to change the C. difficile world with a common focus; To
improve C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety in the healthcare communities worldwide.

twitterhearts

Twitter chats and tweets take place in honor of the
Global C. diff. Awareness Campaign From  November 1st throughout the month.

There will be a #CdiffTwitterChat

Join Us on NOVEMBER 18TH at 3:30 p.m. Eastern Time with  International Infectious Disease Expert, Dr. Hudson Garrett Jr. for a real-time Question and Answer Twitter Chat about Clostridium difficile infection and disease. Questions are welcomed from both patients and healthcare providers. Registration is complimentary to all those interested.  Click on the link below for more information:

https://www.facebook.com/events/1411035768914278/

 

VOLUNTEER PATIENT ADVOCATES:

worldaroundWe applaud our Volunteer Patient Advocates around the globe who continue sharing life-saving information from villages to cities organizing meetings during the month of November to reach a little higher, speak a little louder and elevate C. difficile infection awareness, prevention, treatments, and environmental safety for everyone to witness a decrease in C. diff. infections worldwide.  Each Volunteer is a special leaf, on each branch of the growing  C Diff Foundation tree.  Our sincere gratitude to each of our Volunteers worldwide!

Follow the C Diff Foundation on

Facebook    https://www.facebook.com/CdiffFoundationRadio/                                                    Twitter @CDiffFoundation

Pinetrest, and LinkedIn and join the fight and save lives.

Thank you for your support that helps our mission continue moving forward.

Educating and advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety and support worldwide.

Be sure to check back as new events will be added weekly.