Category Archives: EPA Registered C. diff kill cleaning products: Environmental Safety

Clorox Healthcare® VersaSure™ Cleaner Disinfectant Wipes Introduced

Patented alcohol-free quat technology with the versatility to use throughout healthcare settings with broad-spectrum disinfection

 

 

Clorox Healthcare is proud to announce the latest addition to its industry-leading portfolio of healthcare disinfectants: new Clorox Healthcare® VersaSureCleaner Disinfectant Wipes, an innovative, alcohol-free quat solution versatile enough to use on common healthcare surfaces with the assurance of broad-spectrum disinfection.

Clorox Healthcare® VersaSureCleaner Disinfectant Wipes are Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered to kill 44 pathogens, including bacteria, viruses and fungi, in two minutes or less. The unique, low odor, low residue formula features patented technology that enhances quat activity on surfaces to deliver broader efficacy and faster kill times without co-actives. The result is a versatile, one-step cleaner disinfectant wipe with the speed and efficacy healthcare facilities rely on and superior aesthetics, wetness and cleaning power needed for convenient, compliant use facility-wide.

Clorox Healthcare® VersaSureCleaner Disinfectant Wipes’ innovative new formula provides:

  • Speed and Strength Against Key Pathogens: VersaSure is EPA-registered to kill 44 microorganisms, including 14 multi-drug resistant pathogens, in two minutes or less. VersaSure kills influenza viruses, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), measles, mumps and other viruses in 30 seconds1 and kills bacteria and fungi, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE), Escherichia coli (E. coli), salmonella, mycobacterium bovis (TB) and Candida albicans, in two minutes.
  • Excellent Aesthetics and Cleaning Power: Patented alcohol-free quat technology and innovative wipe design combine to provide excellent aesthetics, wetness and cleaning power. The low residue formula is designed for superior staff and patient comfort with no harsh chemical fumes or odors. Durable, low-linting wipes are textured for greater strength. Excellent wetness provides greater surface coverage compared with competitor quat and quat-alcohol disinfectant wipes and assurance that treated surfaces will remain wet for the full contact time.
  • Convenient, Compatible Use: VersaSure wipes are ready-to-use, fast acting and compatible with a broad range of hard, non-porous surfaces found in healthcare settings. A variety of sizes, including multipurpose wipes in 85 and 150 count canisters and 30 count flat packs, and terminal wipes for everyday cleaning and disinfecting of large spaces, available in 110 count buckets and refill pouches, makes VersaSure convenient for both nurses and environmental services teams to use facility-wide.

“Not all disinfectants are created equal and many don’t have the optimal balance of attributes to meet users’ needs. For example, a conventional quat or alcohol-based product might offer good compatibility, but have limited kill claims or evaporate from surfaces before meeting the required contact time,” says Brian Thompson, department manager – R&D, Clorox Healthcare. “We believe healthcare facilities shouldn’t have to make those trade-offs and with VersaSure, they don’t. Our R&D teams refused to make compromises between efficacy, aesthetics, wetness and cleaning power, and today we are excited to offer a one-step, ‘use everywhere’ wipe with broad-spectrum efficacy healthcare facilities can trust.”

Building the Industry’s Most Innovative, Comprehensive Portfolio of Disinfecting Solutions

In the fight against infections, today’s healthcare facilities need proven solutions to kill a broad range of pathogens, from seasonal threats like influenza and deadly pathogens like Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), to community-associated MRSA and new threats posed by emerging viral pathogens. Clorox Healthcare offers the industry’s most robust portfolio of EPA-registered surface disinfectants in addition to advanced UV technology, as well as cleaning and odor removal products to provide healthcare facilities, nurses and EVS professionals with a comprehensive portfolio of best-in-class solutions to help reduce the risk of infections and keep patients, staff, visitors and the broader community safe.

Clorox Healthcare understands that safeguarding healthcare environments requires advanced and evolving solutions. VersaSure joins products like Clorox Healthcare® Fuzion Cleaner Disinfectant, a new type of bleach that combines disinfecting efficacy against tough-to-kill pathogens like C. difficile spores with broad surface compatibility,

Clorox Healthcare® Bleach Germicidal Wipes and Clorox Healthcare® Hydrogen Peroxide Cleaner Disinfectants in a class of ready-to-use disinfectants that are tough on pathogens and optimized for surface compatibility, aesthetics, ease-of-use and patient and staff comfort to enable broad use, promote compliance and enhance safety facility-wide.

“At Clorox Healthcare, we are constantly innovating and working to expand the depth and breadth of our industry-leading portfolio, both by pushing the envelope with new product development and constantly striving for improvement to ensure that the mainstay surface disinfectants healthcare facilities depend on continue to meet the highest standards of efficacy and evolving needs of real-world healthcare environments,” says Lynda Lurie, director – marketing, Clorox Healthcare. “The expansion of our portfolio with the launch of VersaSure, brings us one step closer to our goal of removing the environment from the infection prevention equation.”

About Clorox Healthcare
Building on a century-long legacy in cleaning and disinfecting, Clorox Healthcare offers a wide range of products to help stop the spread of infection in healthcare facilities. From comprehensive surface disinfection to advanced ultraviolet technology, we are committed to providing efficacious solutions to the healthcare community. For more information, visit www.CloroxHealthcare.com or follow @CloroxHealth on Twitter.

1Kills rotavirus in two minutes.

 

Clorox Healthcare logo (PRNewsFoto/Clorox Professional Products Co.)

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SOURCE Clorox Healthcare

Read more at https://www.thecloroxcompany.com/release/#tHkDJjKXBYteXfXg.99

Edmond A. Hooker, MD, DrPH and Nancy Foster, VP, Quality and Patient Safety Policy, American Hospital Association Discuss the CMS 2019 Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) on ‘C.diff. Spores and More’ Radio on July 3rd

Listen in on Tuesday, July 3rd at 1:00 p.m. ET

C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network©

www.cdiffradio.com

Hosted by the C Diff Foundation   brought to you by VoiceAmerica and sponsored by Clorox Healthcare

Our guests Edmond A. Hooker, MD, DrPH and Nancy Foster, Vice President, Quality and Patient Safety Policy, American Hospital Association will be discussing the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,  CMS 2019 Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) proposed rule – which includes proposals to de-duplicate measures across the five hospital quality reporting programs.

This special live broadcast discussion will be about the CMS’ recent proposals for Healthcare-associated infection (HAI) measures and to provide facts that will bring forth a better understanding of the proposed rule.

Guest Information:

Eddie Hooker, MD, DrPH,  is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Services Administration at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio. He is also an Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Louisville and at Wright State University. His areas of expertise include emergency medicine, epidemiology, health-services management, and public health.

Dr. Hooker received his BS degree from Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia. He earned his MD degree from Eastern Virginia Medical School. He then completed his residency training in Emergency Medicine at the University of Louisville. As a full-time faculty member at the University of Louisville from 1991 until 1996, Dr. Hooker served as an Associate Professor and Director of Resident Research. He was very active in brain trauma and stroke research. Dr. Hooker most recently practiced emergency medicine at a private hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was active cardiac research.   Since 2005, Dr. Hooker has been teaching in the Department of Health Services Administration at Xavier University. In the spring of 2007, Dr. Hooker earned his Doctorate in Public Health from the University of Kentucky.

Dr. Hooker continues to be active in emergency medicine and public-health research. He has authored more than 20 publications in leading emergency-medicine journals, published many book chapters, and continues to have an active research agenda. Dr. Hooker serves as an editor for Emedicine, an online clinical knowledge base. He is the medical advisor for Indian Hill Schools.

……………..

Nancy Foster is the Vice President for Quality and Patient Safety Policy at the American Hospital Association. In this role, she provides advice to public policymakers on legislation and regulations intended to improve patient safety and quality in America’s hospitals. Foster is the AHA’s point person at the National Quality Forum, the Hospital Workgroup of the Measures Application Partnership, and is the liaison to the Joint Commission’s Board, and represents hospital perspectives at many national meetings.

Prior to joining the AHA, Foster was the Coordinator for Quality Activities at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). In this role, she was the principal staff person for the Quality Interagency Coordination Task Force, which brought Federal agencies with health care responsibilities together to coordinate their work and engage in projects to improve quality and safety. She also led the development of patient safety research agenda for AHRQ and managed a portfolio of quality and safety research grants in excess of $10 million.

She is a graduate of Princeton University and has completed graduate work at Chapman University and Johns Hopkins University. In 2000, she was chosen as an Excellence in Government Leadership Fellow.

C. diff. Spores and More ™“ spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the
C. diff.
community and more.

Through their interviews, the C Diff Foundation mission will connect, educate, and empower listeners worldwide.

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  • This live broadcast will be archived in the ‘C.diff. Spores and More’ library and can be easily accessed at your leisure.   www.cdiffradio.com

California Hemet Valley Medical Center Adds UV Technology to Enhance Patient Safety

Hemet Valley Medical Center has implemented innovative ultraviolet technology with the addition of the Clorox Healthcare® Optimum-UV® System. The system helps remove harmful bacteria and pathogens that can jeopardize health, providing patients, visitors and staff with an additional layer of safety and protection.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration Released Notice For Hospital Mattress Safety

Health care facilities everywhere have been ramping up their disinfection practices in order to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. However, when it comes to hospital mattresses, one of the biggest vectors for spreading deadly bugs, efforts are still falling short.

With health care workers using chemicals that are intended for dry surfaces, the mattresses are harboring pathogens such as Clostridium difficile (C. diff), and, as Edmond A. Hooker, MD, DrPH, professor in the Department of Health Administration at Xavier University, pointed out at the 5th Annual International C. diff Awareness & Health Expo, regulatory agencies seem to have “turned a blind eye” to the issue.

Until now.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently released a notice on how to keep hospital mattress covers safe.

In this notice, the FDA notes safety concerns regarding hospital mattress covers, particularly that over time they can “wear out and allow blood and body fluids to penetrate and get trapped inside mattresses.” They added, “If blood or body fluids from one patient penetrate and get absorbed in a mattress, the fluids can leak out the next time the mattress is used.” If that happens, the next patient runs the risk of coming into contact with these fluids, and thus, becoming infected with pathogens from the bed’s previous occupants.

The FDA reports that this is not the first time they acknowledged these concerns; they released a safety communication in 2013 to make health care workers aware of the issue. However, the problem of contaminated hospital mattresses persists.

“There is no question there has been report after report after report of, ‘We had this outbreak. We killed all these people.’ There was just a report that came out on 18 people who were sick in a French hospital; they were on beds manufactured here in America, and 4 people were killed before they finally realized that it was the mattresses. They took all of the mattresses out of service and stopped the outbreak,” Dr. Hooker told Contagion ® in an exclusive interview.

“There’s a reason that it’s an under reported problem; hospitals don’t want to say, ‘Hey, we just killed a bunch of people. We kill 29,000 people a year with C. difficile infections. Do you hear that? I mean, that’s like crashing a plane every day and we do nothing about it. We just act like it didn’t happen.”

In an effort to address the issue, the FDA has released recommendations based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for environmental infection control in health care facilities; they include:

  1. Develop an inspection plan for all hospital mattresses and mattress covers in the facility. Learn the time of life for all mattresses/mattress covers by checking the manufacturer’s guidelines; follow any other recommendations that the manufacturers list. If you have any additional questions, contact the mattress manufacturer.
  2. Inspect each hospital mattress for visible signs of damage, which can include: cuts, tears, cracks, pinholes, snags, or stains. On a routine basis, remove mattress covers and check the inside. With the cover removed, check the mattress for wet spots, staining, or other signs of damage. Be sure to check all sides of the mattress as well as underneath. You will not be able to effectively inspect the mattress with the cover on.
  3. Remove any mattresses that are damaged, appear worn, or are visibly stained and immediately replace any mattress covers that are damaged.
  4. Maintain your mattresses and mattress covers by cleaning and disinfecting them “according to the manufacturer’s guidelines.” DO NOT stick needles into the hospital mattress through the cover, the FDA stresses.

“The FDA notice about mattress failures is an important first step. However, much more needs to be done. Most failures are not being reported to FDA, and the 700 reports that they have represents an industry-wide problem. Up to one-third of hospital mattresses currently in service in hospitals have failed. Also, the ones that have not failed are not being cleaned,”

Dr. Hooker stressed to Contagion ® in a follow-up interview. “These mattresses quickly get fissures and microscopic cracks that allow bacteria to remain on the surface during terminal cleaning. The next patient is then exposed to those bacteria and gets a hospital-acquired infection. The CDC needs to mandate better cleaning practices nationwide, which they can do.

The CDC needs to also mandate inspection of every mattress after every patient. Damaged mattresses should be removed from service immediately.”

 

To review the article in its entirety, please click on the link below to be re-directed:

http://www.contagionlive.com/news/fda-acknowledges-hospital-mattresses-as-hotbed-for-germs-releases-recommendations

C Diff Foundation and C diff Survivors Alliance Network Share a Winter 2017 Bulletin

Greetings from the main office of the C Diff Foundation and the C diff Survivors Alliance Network located in New Port Richey, Florida.  As we close 2017 we mark the 5th anniversary of the two organizations. We want to share with you a summary and reflection on this year’s events and campaigns moving our mission forward and message delivered worldwide. The mission and promoting C.diff. Awareness has been shared this year with  listeners in over 25 Counties during Season III on C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network (www.cdiffradio.com),  5,000+ visitors during global events, 9,600+ residents and business owners throughout villages and communities by our dedicated volunteer patient advocates, to over 1,000 clinicians who received up-to-date data expanding their knowledge during workshops and local symposiums offered worldwide, 3,000+ incoming calls received through the Nationwide Hot-Line 1-844-FOR-CDIF with the thousands of e-mails received seeking assistance.

After each event, workshop, meeting, introduction we thank the individuals for sharing  in five years of opportunity to provide life-saving data educating and advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety and support worldwide.  The mission of the C Diff Foundation is the momentum of charity that has proven effective and grown over the past five years.  A single act of charity grows into more and greater charity worldwide.  The work each member of the C Diff Foundation, with hundreds of Volunteer Patient Advocates, promote the Foundation’s mission which never stops with a single act.  Instead, it builds, it grows, and it expands into an exponential impact of good in the world helping to save lives.  We thank you for your continued support and encourage you to continue your journey, proposing three verbs important to the C Diff Foundation and the C diff Survivors Alliance Network in general.

The first of these verbs is “to promote” C.diff. Awareness. It is the first step that opens doors in educating individuals, clinicians, communities in learning more about this life-threatening infection which causes a great amount of pain and suffering around the globe.  It is essential and it is the compass in reaching shared goals.

The second verb is “to heighten awareness” across the nation to continue proclaiming November Clostridium difficile infection awareness month. The Governors proclaimed November C. difficile (C.diff) infection awareness month in 2017 and we encourage them “to welcome” this proclamation in 2018 with more than a yearly executive order of greeting or inviting their residents to take notice.  We look forward to working with delegates, with your support, to make this proclamation statement nationwide and welcome the importance of the time, education, programs, and agenda in place addressing this life-threatening infection.  The C Diff Foundation advocates and supports the individuals and families suffering during and after being treated for a C. diff. infection.

Finally, the third verb that the C Diff Foundation and C diff Survivors Alliance Network propose is “to go.”  Here we are all challenged to do something big or small — with what we are able to do.  With the unity of members with volunteers with patients, families, and clinicians we can make a difference with enthusiasm and simplicity to get up and go.  We can do for others  today what we could not do for ourselves during our time of illnesses, during the long periods of isolation, during the losses, and during the pain and suffering.

As members of the C Diff Foundation we know that our enthusiasm  for our mission is the desire to bring awareness and promote C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety and support worldwide.  We witness changes by the data and information being delivered within villages,  through major cities and in small communities — it is only by taking this path that we gain satisfaction knowing that the news delivered with enthusiasm “to promote, to heighten awareness and to go” with the members and volunteers in the C Diff Foundation and C diff Survivors Alliance Network creates positive results.

We are truly grateful for your continued dedication, efforts and support and thank you again for making this year’s November anniversary such a special occasion through the growth and advances made worldwide.   Let’s carry the mission into the New Year, carving new paths to witness the decline of newly diagnosed cases of Clostridium difficile (C.diff., C. difficile) infections and saving lives worldwide.

“None of us can do this alone ~ All of us can do this together.”

 

 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Announced Methods and Guidance for Evaluating Efficacy of Antimicrobial Products against Clostridium difficile Spores

 

On September 29, 2017, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the availability of two final test method Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) for evaluating the efficacy of antimicrobial products against  Clostridium difficile (C. diff) spores.

EPA also released regulatory guidance for test criteria and pesticide claims for these products, specifically “Methods and Guidance for Testing the Efficacy of Antimicrobial Products Against Spores of Clostridium difficile on Hard Non-Porous Surfaces.”  These test methods and guidance provide a framework for registrants who seek to make a claim for antimicrobial pesticide products to control these spores on hard, non-porous surfaces.

C. diff is an anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium and a  leading hospital-acquired infection.  The spores survive on hard surfaces such as glass, metals, and plastics that are commonly found in health-care settings.

Antimicrobial pesticides are used to reduce the number of spores on environmental surfaces.  Under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), the registrant of an antimicrobial product with a public health claim is required to submit efficacy data to EPA in support of the product’s registration.

EPA MLB SOP MB-28 describes the test methodology for producing and storing standardized spore suspensions of C. diff based on ASTM E2839, Standard Test Method for Production of C. difficile Spores for Use in Efficacy Evaluation of Antimicrobial Agents (ASTM International).  A spore suspension should be developed and qualified according to EPA MLB SOP MB-28 before an efficacy evaluation can be performed using method EPA MLB SOP MB-31.  EPA MLB SOP MB-31 describes a quantitative method intended for evaluating the sporicidal efficacy of liquid disinfectants against spores of C. diff on inanimate, hard, non-porous surfaces.

EPA solicited comments on the clarity of the test method SOPs and the regulatory guidance in December 2016.  EPA received comments from twelve entities and revised the drafts to incorporate suggested changes.  EPA posted its response to those comments in Docket No. EPA-HQ-OPP-2016-0753-0026.  EPA also is working with ASTM International, a standard-setting organization, on adoption of these test methods as official ASTM standards.

EPA’s response to comments and other documents associated with this action are available in Docket No. EPA-HQ-OPP-2016-0753 at www.regulations.gov

The methods and guidance also are found on EPA’s Antimicrobial Testing Methods & Procedures Developed by EPA’s Microbiology Laboratory webpage, at the Methods tab as Method IDs MB-28 and MB-31, and at the Guidance tab as Sporicidal Claims Against Clostridium difficile.

 

Source:  https://www.natlawreview.com/article/methods-and-guidance-testing-efficacy-antimicrobials-against-spores-clostridium

4 Year Sepsis Study of New York’s Sepsis Regulations Being Launched By University of Pittsburgh Researcher

A University of Pittsburgh researcher is launching a four-year study of New York’s sepsis regulations to see what worked and what didn’t in the state’s fight against one of health care’s biggest killers.

Research has shown that speeding up sepsis treatment, which New York’s law accomplished, reduces deaths from the condition . The new study will examine the law more broadly, probing whether it might have had unintended negative consequences.

“Just because the protocol is good doesn’t mean that a regulatory-based effort to force hospitals to adopt these protocols led to better outcomes,” said Dr. Jeremy Kahn, a Pitt professor of critical care medicine and health policy and management who is heading the $1.5 million study.

New York required hospitals to adopt time-based sepsis protocols in 2013 after a 12-year-old boy, Rory Staunton, died from the condition after cutting his arm in a gym class a year earlier. The condition, in which the body’s immune system overreacts to infection, contributes to as many as half of all hospital deaths, according to the National Institutes of Health.

Sepsis has been likened to heart attacks and strokes, which killed many more patients before evidence-based treatment protocols were adopted. Hospitals in most states aren’t required to do anything specific to treat the condition, although many have voluntarily adopted protocols. Pennsylvania Health Department officials have said they plan to launch a two-year process this fall to incorporate sepsis protocols in the state’s hospital regulations.

New York’s protocols include taking blood cultures to guide diagnosis and treatment, analyzing lactate levels that can signify septic shock and administering fluids and antibiotics.

Kahn said the protocols raise concerns over two primary dangers: overuse of antibiotics and overuse of fluids.

The study of New York’s three-hour protocols found that administering fluids didn’t appear to improve outcomes, and too much fluid can lead to harm, Kahn said. Antibiotics, while a critical part of sepsis treatment, can also harm patients by killing good bacteria in the gut and creating a more welcoming environment for a deadly infection known as C-diff.

The new study, funded by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, will examine complications, length of hospital stays, costs and other elements of the protocols, Kahn said. The study will compare sepsis treatment outcomes in New York to outcomes in Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Washington and Florida, he said — states with similar numbers and types of hospitals.

“The hope would be to help policymakers in other states, specifically in Pennsylvania, as they design these regulations,” he said.

He expects bigger hospitals with more resources will have better sepsis outcomes than smaller rural hospitals. Another factor that might influence outcomes is whether hospitals have a designated sepsis specialist who influences how hospitals approach the condition.

Researchers plan to study the effects of sepsis policies for the first two years — delivering early results to Harrisburg before the planned update to hospital regulations — and to spend another two years interviewing doctors and health care specialists to gather more detail about how the protocols work.

“We can’t stand by as hundreds of thousands of Americans are dying each year of sepsis,” Kahn said. “But the question is, can we craft those policies; can the policy response to sepsis be evidence-based?”