Tag Archives: How to decrease risk of Foodborne Illnesses

Cleveland Clinic Shares 9 Places Germs Are Lurking In the Kitchen

Did you know that about 9% of foodborne illness outbreaks occur in the home and it’s almost impossible to tell where the bacteria may live with the naked eye?

Research has identified the top kitchen items that are commonly cross-contaminated during the preparation of a meal (yuck!). Infectious disease specialist Susan Rehm, MD, outlines these top kitchen contaminators and how to make sure you don’t get sick.

1. Cloth towel

Like sponges, cloth towels were the most frequently contaminated article in the kitchen. How many times have you used a towel to wipe off the counter after cooking, washed your hands, and then wiped your clean hands with that same towel? It happens more often than you think.

“One of the best ways to prevent cross-contamination in the kitchen is to use paper towels,” says Dr. Rehm.

Research also shows that salmonella grows on cloths stored overnight, even after they were washed and rinsed in the sink. To minimize the risk of contamination, either strictly use paper towels or use a new, clean cloth for each surface in your kitchen. Be sure to wash your towels with bleach or other disinfectants before using them again.

2. Smartphone or tablet

Just like if you take your phone to the bathroom with you, anything you touch in the kitchen following contact with raw meat can become contaminated. That includes your smartphone or tablet you use to follow a recipe or answer a call.

“Either don’t use it or clean it as frequently as you would wash your hands,” she says.

Consider covering your device with clear plastic or printing out the recipe so you don’t have to touch your device. If you don’t want to print it out, make sure to disinfect your phone afterward.

To disinfect your phone, Dr. Rehm recommends following these steps:

  1. Take the case off and turn your phone or tablet off completely.
  2. Mist a gentle cleaning cloth with 70% isopropyl alcohol.
  3. Gently wipe down each corner of your phone or tablet.
  4. Wipe down your case and any phone accessories with the same solution.
  5. Let dry completely before turning your device on.

Never use harsh chemicals on your devices. Double-check with your phone brand on the proper way to disinfect their products so you don’t end up ruining your expensive tech.

3. Sink faucet, refrigerator, oven handle, trash container

When was the last time you disinfected your sink faucet, refrigerator, oven, or trash can?

“During food prep, be aware that there are bacteria in food, and touching it can spread it to other surfaces and potentially cause illness,” says Dr. Rehm. “Common bacteria found in the kitchen include E.coli, salmonella, shigella, campylobacter, norovirus, and hepatitis A.”

E.coli can survive for hours on a surface, salmonella can survive for about four hours and hepatitis A can survive for months. If those numbers make you nervous, lessen your chances of getting those germs by disinfecting each surface that bacteria could have come into contact with. And yes, that means wiping down or spraying each surface in your kitchen that you worked at just to be sure.

4. Cooking utensils

With so many different kitchen utensils, it’s important to be aware of how you use them, too.

“When you use tongs or a fork to put raw poultry on the grill, you should wash it immediately afterward if you plan to use the same tools to serve the meal,” says Dr. Rehm.

Sanitize your utensils by hand-washing in hot, soapy water and sanitizing solution. Make sure to air-dry them completely before putting them away into the cupboard.

5. Hands

Believe it or not, it’s common for people to not wash their hands with the frequency or quality needed to reduce bacterial contamination.

“When preparing food, it’s wise to wash hands beforehand, frequently throughout, and afterward,” says Dr. Rehm.

Each time you handle raw meat, wash your hands. Lather your hands with soap (don’t forget your nails, between your fingers and the back of your hands!) Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds, and then use a paper towel to dry them and turn off the water faucets and don’t reuse it. Throw the used paper towel away immediately after use.

6. Fruit and vegetables

Bacteria can be found on your favorite fruit and veggies.

If you’re not careful, that bacteria could cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Cleaning up is less effective than not contaminating it in the first place, so make it a habit to keep surfaces as clean as possible the first time to avoid cross-contamination. ​

Food Safety Tips to Reduce Risk of a Food-borne Illness During a Holiday Gathering – Memorial Day Message

Remembering those who sacrificed everything so we could have anything

It takes courage to keep the faith of the people alive and fight with courage for the people of the country. Our soldiers deserve all the honor and respect.

A bit of history:  Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day of remembrance for those who have died in service of the United States of America. Over two dozen cities and towns claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day. While Waterloo N.Y. was officially declared the birthplace of Memorial Day by President Lyndon Johnson in May 1966, it’s difficult to prove conclusively the origins of the day.

Each and every soldier who fought for the nation was someone’s son or daughter, someone’s brother or sister, someone’s  Mother or Father, and someone’s friend….. Memorial Day is the day to take inspiration from such brave soldiers and stand with their families.   On this  occasion, let us bow our heads in silence to remember and honor the sacrifices of hundreds of men and women who gave their lives for the country.

Sending warm wishes to you and your family on Memorial Day.

 

 

 

During the Memorial Holiday and during the many festivities taking place from towns to cities — it is a good time to take a “hand-washing break”

Wash your hands with soap and clean running water for about 20 seconds and if soap and clean water are not available, use an alcohol-based product.  Alcohol-based hand rubs significantly reduce the number of germs on skin and are fast-acting.

Wash your hands with soap and water during these key times when you are likely to get and spread germs:
  • Before, during, and after preparing food
  • After touching raw meat, raw eggs, or unwashed vegetables
  • Before eating or drinking
  • Before and after caring for someone who is sick
  • Before and after treating a cut or wound
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
  • Before exiting a restroom *
  • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
  • After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste
  • After touching garbage.

FOOD SAFETY TIPS ~ Backyard Gatherings to Picnics

Serve Foods Safely

  • If preparing food in advance, divide cooked food into shallow containers  and store in a refrigerator or freezer. This encourages rapid, even cooling.
  • Keep hot foods hot, at 140°F or warmer. Use slow cookers, chafing dishes, and warming trays to keep food hot on the buffet table.
  • Keep cold foods col , at 40°F or lower. Use small serving trays and replace often with fresh platters from the refrigerator, or place serving dishes in bowls of ice so they stay chilled.
  • For picnics and other outdoor meals, keep cold food in a cooler filled with ice or frozen gel packs until just before serving. Catering or getting food delivered?     Make sure food that is catered or delivered stays at a safe temperature.

Divide leftovers into smaller portions or pieces, place in shallow containers, and refrigerate or freeze.

The Two-Hour Rule:  Throw away any perishable foods that have been out at room temperature for 2 hours or more.

Toss them after 1 hour if they’ve been sitting out at temperatures of 90°F or hotter, such as food served at a picnic or outdoor family reunion.

Use a food thermometer to be sure foods are cooked to the right temperature.

  • Store and Reheat Leftovers the Correct Way >>>>
  • Divide leftovers into smaller portions or pieces, place in shallow containers, and refrigerate or freeze.
  • Leftover foods should be refrigerated at 40°F or below as soon as possible and within two hours of preparation. It’s OK to put hot foods directly into the refrigerator.
  • Leftovers should be reheated to at least 165°F before serving. This includes leftovers warmed up in the microwave.

Have  a Safe Holiday!

Source:  https://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/serving-food-safely.html