Tag Archives: Recurrent C. difficile Infection Clinical Trials

Inquire and Consider Becoming A Candidate In a C. difficile Infection Clinical Trial To Help You – Help Them – Help Others

Every scientific research and development, every clinical trial in progress is a glimmer of hope………..HOPE for clinically safe and approved avenues to prevent and treat a
C. difficile infection
.

 

 

Listed below you will find a web link that will redirect you to obtain information that pertains to organizations who have on-going
C. difficile Prevention and Treatment clinical trials in progress.  

Click on each organization’s website link to review their research and clinical trial study opportunities — Inquire if you or your loved one qualify to participate in a study. Please direct all clinical trial questions to the companies offering the clinical trials.  Thank you.

To Learn More About Clinical Trials —

ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants conducted around the world. Learn more About Clinical Studies and About This Site, including relevant History, Policies, and Laws.  Click on the link below to be redirected to the clinicaltrials.gov website:

https://clinicaltrials.gov/

 

Clinical Studies In Progress To

Help You — Help Them — Help Others  ♥

 

 

Here is a list of Clinical Trial Phases:

Clinical trials are conducted in a series of steps, called phases – each phase is designed to answer a separate research question.

  • Phase I: Researchers test a new drug or treatment in a small group of people for the first time to evaluate its safety, determine a safe dosage range, and identify side effects.
  • Phase II: The drug or treatment is given to a larger group of people to see if it is effective and to further evaluate its safety.
  • Phase III: The drug or treatment is given to large groups of people to confirm its effectiveness, monitor side effects, compare it to commonly used treatments, and collect information that will allow the drug or treatment to be used safely.
  • Phase IV: Studies are done after the drug or treatment has been marketed to gather information on the drug’s effect in various populations and any side effects associated with long-term use.

Additional Resource Information on clinical trials can be found at http://clinicaltrials.gov/info/resources

 

To review C. difficile Clinical Trials Available Today, please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://cdifffoundation.org/clinical-trials-2/

 

 

 

 

DISCLAIMER
“The C Diff Foundation’s mission is to educate and advocate for Clostridium difficile infection prevention, treatments, support, and environmental safety worldwide.
The C Diff Foundation’s organization is comprised of 100% volunteering members who are dedicated to our mission and adhere to the Foundation’s Code of Ethics
which prohibits paid endorsements and/or paid promotion of products, services, medications, or clinical studies in progress.   All website postings are strictly for
information purposes.
All website entries, public presentations, and workshops are to raise C. diff. infection awareness in all areas of the C Diff Foundation’s mission statement, including infection prevention, diagnostics, sepsis, healthcare-associated infections, antimicrobial resistance, antibiotic stewardship and provide education on all the above.”

Rebiotix Reports Topline Results From a Controlled Open-label Phase 2 Trial of RBX2660 (PUNCH™ Open Label) For the Prevention of Recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) Infection (rCDI)

In The News

April 2017

 

 

Rebiotix Inc., a clinical-stage microbiome company focused on harnessing the power of the human microbiome to treat challenging diseases, today announced topline results from a controlled open-label Phase 2 trial of RBX2660 (PUNCH™ Open Label) for the prevention of recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infection.

Data indicated that RBX2660 was well-tolerated and achieved the primary efficacy endpoint of preventing C. diff. recurrence; patients treated with RBX2660 exhibited a treatment success rate of 78.8% compared with a historical control of 51.8% (p<0.0001). RBX2660 is a broad-spectrum microbiota suspension that is designed to rehabilitate the human microbiome by delivering live microbes into a patient’s intestinal tract to treat disease.

Lee Jones, president and CEO of Rebiotix, stated, “The 78.8% treatment success achieved in this open label Phase 2 trial demonstrates the potential of RBX2660, a broad spectrum microbiota drug product, to rehabilitate the gut microbiome and break the cycle of C. diff. recurrence. These results, coupled with the safety and efficacy data observed in our prior Phase 2b and Phase 2 clinical trials, position Rebiotix to advance RBX2660 into Phase 3 clinical development, solidifying our standing as the most clinically advanced microbiome company in the industry.”

PUNCH™ Open Label was designed as a prospective, multicenter, open-label, controlled Phase 2 study to assess the efficacy and safety of RBX2660 for the prevention of recurrent C. diff.

The primary efficacy endpoint involved a comparison of patients treated with RBX2660 to a closely matched set of antibiotic only treated historical controls through 56 days. There were 31 active treatment sites and four control sites in the US and Canada. 132 RBX2660 and 110 historical control subjects were included in this topline analysis.

Actively treated patients, after determining eligibility, were administered two doses of RBX2660; the first at day one and the second at day seven. Patients were then monitored for eight weeks to determine whether there was a recurrence of C. diff.

Top line results from the trial, which examined responses from 132 patients versus a historical control of 110 patients, indicated a treatment success rate of 78.8% as compared to a historical control of 51.8% (p<0.0001). Overall, RBX2660 was generally well-tolerated with the most commonly reported adverse events being gastrointestinal, including diarrhea, abdominal pain, flatulence, constipation and distension.


About Rebiotix Inc.

Rebiotix Inc. is a clinical-stage microbiome company focused on harnessing the power of the human microbiome to revolutionize the treatment of challenging diseases. Rebiotix is the most clinically advanced microbiome company in the industry, with its lead drug candidate, RBX2660, expected to enter Phase 3 clinical development for the prevention of recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infection. Previously, RBX2660 was the subject of three Phase 2 trials in recurrent C. diff, including a Phase 2b randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (PUNCH™ CD2), with data indicating the drug was well-tolerated and demonstrated statistically significant treatment efficacy. RBX2660 has been granted Orphan Drug status, Fast Track status and Breakthrough Therapy Designation from the FDA for its potential to prevent recurrent C. diff. infection.

Rebiotix’s development pipeline includes multiple formulations targeting several disease indications and is built around its pioneering Microbiota Restoration Therapy (MRT) platform. MRT is a standardized, stabilized drug technology that is designed to rehabilitate the human microbiome by delivering a broad spectrum of live microbes into a patient’s intestinal tract via a ready-to-use and easy-to-administer format.

For More Information About C. difficile Clinical Trials In Progress : 

https://cdifffoundation.org/clinical-trials-2/

 

For more information on Rebiotix and its pipeline of human microbiome-directed therapies, visit www.rebiotix.com

 

Source:  Rebiotix 4/17

Microbiome – C. diff. Treatments On The Horizon

NewsUpdate

 

 

 

PROBIOTICS:

Pick a disease or disorder, and somebody, somewhere, has said that a probiotic supplement—an over-the-counter, unregulated pill usually filled with a single strain of friendly gut bacteria—might cure it, whether it’s cancer, obsessive-compulsive disorder, or a yeast infection.

But there’s very little evidence that probiotic supplements do any good. “There’s a lot of promise here but not a lot of proof yet,” said Cliff McDonald, associate director for science at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion.

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CDC Reports:

Half a million people a year are infected with C. diff in the U.S., the CDC estimates, with 29,000 annual deaths related to the diarrheic bacterium. More than 65 percent of C. diff infections involve exposure in a health-care facility, according to a 2015 study, creating more than $4.8 billion in excess health-care costs at acute-care facilities alone.

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C. diff. Treatments On The Horizon:

To Learn More About ALL C. diff. Clinical Trials In Progress Click On The Following Link:

https://cdifffoundation.org/clinical-trials-2/

 

Seres Therapeutics, a microbiome-based biopharmaceutical company in Cambridge, Mass., is developing a pill, subject to a rigorous approval process under the Food and Drug Administration, to tackle recurrent Clostridium difficile. (The digestive system’s microbiome is the community of healthy gut bacteria that normally reside in the body.)

Seres aims to put the science behind a proven treatment of recurrent C. diff, fecal transplants, in a pill, which wouldn’t require a colonoscopy. Like probiotic supplements, it’s a gut bacteria product. Unlike the supplements, by the time it’s available it will have gone through the FDA wringer. It will contain about 50 strains of bacteria proven effective in treating C. diff and will require a doctor’s prescription.

Recurrent C. diff is an obvious entry point for Seres, said Chief Executive Officer Roger Pomerantz. “We asked, what is the lowest-hanging fruit?” But it’s hardly the end. The company has built a microbiome library of 14,000 strains of human bacteria it hopes will help it treat a range of diseases, eventually without needing feces at all.   Seres has embarked on the research with some pretty lofty goals, including finding treatments for obesity, liver disease, and cancer. It has partnerships with Massachusetts General Hospital, the Mayo Clinic, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and other respected medical institutions.  “We will figure out exactly what’s wrong with the microbiome, design a drug, and then pull the organisms out with our library, never touching a human donation,” Pomerantz said.    Seres’s lead product candidate, SER-109, will treat recurrent C. diff with four capsules taken orally instead of with transplants. While fecal matter is the raw material for the pills, the final product consists only of the spores necessary to treat the infection, which will have been extracted and purified.  SER-109 is expected to become the first oral microbiome therapy approved by the FDA, though Seres declined to predict exactly when it will arrive. Results from the latest trials are due by midyear, and Phase 3 trials are scheduled to follow later in the year. Seres hopes to follow up quickly with SER-287, a drug to treat ulcerative colitis, which could be the first microbiome drug to treat a chronic disease, and SER-262, to treat primary C. diff before it turns into the recurrent kind.

Other companies are racing to collect enough data for FDA approval, but right now Seres, which is publicly traded, looks to be the one to beat. “Seres is probably going to be the first one that’s going to knock at the FDA’s door,” said Mohan Iyer, chief business officer at Second Genome, a microbiome company studying how to treat disease with the compounds produced by gut bacteria instead of the gut bacteria themselves.

“SER-109 is poised to be first-in-class among fecal microbiota transplant-derived drugs,” Joseph Schwartz, an analyst at Leerink Partners, wrote in a May report. The report says the latest trial results “wowed the Street” but warns that the company could still be held back by “disappointing clinical data” and obstacles in the regulatory process.

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Another top contender is Rebiotix. Its RBX2660 is also designed to treat recurrent C. diff but, unlike SER-109, is administered with an enema; an oral version is in development. The treatment also differs significantly from Seres’s in formulation, including thousands of kinds of microbes from the donor’s stool, compared with SER-109’s 50 or so, as many as could be preserved and some of which haven’t even been identified.

“We make sure we have a minimum concentration of certain kinds that we know the patients lack,” CEO Lee Jones said. “But we don’t identify all of them. There’s no way to do that.” A recent study estimated that 1014 bacteria are in the human gut, most of which have never been isolated. Jones said the drug could hit the market by 2018.

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  • UPDATES:

The medications have been shown to be similarly effective—with no C. diff-associated diarrhea for 29 of 30 of Seres’s patients  and  27 of 31 of Rebiotix’s, in the companies’ latest results—and equally safe. Adverse reactions for both are limited to such problems as moderate diarrhea and abdominal cramping, which could be from the C. diff itself. Both have been designated as “breakthrough therapies” by the FDA, allowing for an expedited approval process, and both are likely soon to provide an at-home alternative to fecal transplants.

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Point Of View:

“I don’t know who is going to make it across the line first,” said Gail Hecht, director of gastroenterology and nutrition at Loyola University Medical Center and chairwoman of the American Gastroenterological Association for Gut Microbiome Research & Education. Hecht has attended a Seres advisory board meeting but doesn’t have a financial interest in the company. “It is indeed a race,” she said.

Seres does have at least one distinct market advantage. “Patients have different preferences,” Hecht observes, but “in general, people don’t particularly like enemas.”

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Human Fecal Transplants:

For nearly two thousand years, doctors have looked to this unlikeliest of places for medicine. One of the earliest documented applications is from the fourth-century Chinese medical doctor Ge Hong, whose “yellow soup” recipe to treat diarrhea included a healthy person’s dried or fermented feces. Sixteen hundred years later, in 1958, patients infected with C. diff received the first known human fecal transplants.

Stool Bank Information: 

Today the effectiveness of fecal transplants (formally known as fecal microbiota transplants) to treat recurrent C. diff is supported by a long list of studies, with researchers attributing the results to the restoration of the microbiome. OpenBiome, a nonprofit stool bank, shipped 1,828 treatments in 2014, a number that ballooned to 7,140 treatments in 2015 and looks to be eclipsed this year, with 4,323 treatments shipped to its clinical partners through May 31. And these numbers don’t take into account the transplants performed through directed fecal donations.

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To read article in its entirety:

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-06-30/coming-soon-gut-bacteria-that-actually-cure-your-disease

U.S. Panel To the Food and Drug Administration Voted 10-5 In Favor For Merck & Co. ‘s bezlotoxumab Effective At Preventing A Recurrence Of C. diff. Infection

NewsUpdate

 Merck & Co’s experimental drug to treat the most common hospital-associated infectious diarrhea
* Clostridium difficile  *  warrants approval, an advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Thursday.

 

The panel voted 10-5, with one abstention, that the drug, bezlotoxumab, was effective in preventing a recurrence of infection with Clostridium difficile, or C. difficile, a germ that causes inflammation of the colon and potentially fatal diarrhea.

The FDA is not obliged to follow the advice of its advisory panels but typically does.

The panel’s vote follows an internal review by FDA staff which found an apparent decrease in recurrence of C. difficile but expressed concern as to whether the drug could hurt the cure rate of the initial C. difficile episode.

Panelists who voted in favor of the drug acknowledged the FDA’s concerns but said they were persuaded there was a need for new targeted therapies and this one seems effective.

“We haven’t had a new drug for C. difficile in our armamentarium for some time,” Dr. Joanna Schaenman, assistant professor of medicine at UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, said.

MORE about bezlotoxumab :   https://cdifffoundation.org/category/clinical-trials/

Merck & Co.   bezlotoxumab was successful in two Phase III trials against the recurrence of

Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection when combined with antibiotics.

Currently, there are no therapies approved for the prevention of recurrent disease caused by C. difficile.

Bezlotoxumab’s approval would also make it the first antibody to treat bacterial infection.

Scientists say mAbs would have benefits over small molecule antibiotics because they are less likely to drive antimicrobial resistance and are administered less frequently. “Results of these studies showed that a single, one-time infusion of the antitoxin bezlotoxumab given with standard of care C. difficile antibiotic treatment significantly reduced the recurrence of C. difficile infection compared to standard of care alone, and demonstrated this benefit over a 12-week period,” said lead investigator Mark Wilcox of the University of Leeds, UK. “These results were also demonstrated in patient subgroups known to be at high risk for C. difficile recurrence.”

C. difficile toxin B can damage the gut wall and cause inflammation, leading to the symptoms of C. difficile enteritis, which include abdominal pain and watery diarrhea. Bezlotoxumab, a fully-human monoclonal antibody, was developed by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s MassBiologics Laboratory with Medarex (now part of Bristol-Myers Squibb), and licensed to Merck in 2009.

The studies   Merck’s studies took more than 1,000 patients each and evaluated them over 12 weeks. Participants received either a single infusion of bezlotoxumab, actoxumab (another mAb designed to fight C. difficile),a combination of the two, or a placebo. The actoxumab arm of the study ended early for efficacy and safety reasons.    Both studies had infection recurrence as their primary endpoint – this rate was significantly lower for the bezlotoxumab arms (17.4% and 15.7%) and bezlotoxumab plus actoxumab arms (15.9% and 14.9%), compared to placebos (27.6% and 25.7%). Actoxumab was found not to provide extra benefit on its own or combined with bezlotoxumab, so Merck’s marketing authorisation application is for bezlotoxumab alone.

The FDA is due to make its decision by July 23.

 

TO READ ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW:

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/health/us-regulatory-panel-backs/2860152.html