Tag Archives: Clostridium difficile treatment clinical studies

Study Investigators Find Combination of Vancomycin and FMT Superior In Treating Recurrent C.difficile Infection (rCDI)

The combination of vancomycin and fecal microbiota transplantation was found to be superior to fidaxomicin or vancomycin in the treatment of patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI), according to a study published in Gastroenterology.

This randomized, single-center trial was designed to compare the efficacy of fecal microbiota transplantation with that of fidaxomicin and vancomycin.

Sixty-four adults with recurrent CDI seen at a gastroenterology clinic in Denmark between April 5, 2016 and June 10, 2018 were randomly assigned to a group receiving fecal microbiota transplantation applied by colonoscopy or nasojejunal tube after 4 to 10 days of 125 mg vancomycin 4 times daily (n=24), or 10 days of 200 mg fidaxomicin 2 times daily (n=24), or 10 days of 125 mg vancomycin 4 times daily (n=16).

Patients experiencing a CDI recurrence after this course of treatment, and those who could not be randomly assigned were provided rescue fecal microbiota transplantation. The primary study outcome was combined clinical resolution and negative polymerase chain reaction test for C difficile toxin at 8 weeks post-treatment, and secondary end points included week 8 clinical resolution.

The combination of negative C difficile test results and clinical resolution was observed in 71% of the 24 participants who received fecal microbiota transplantation (95% CI, 49-87%; n=17), 33% of the 24 participants who received fidaxomicin (95% CI, 16-55%; n=8), and 19% of the 16 participants (95% CI, 5-46%; n=3) who received vancomycin (fecal microbiota transplantation vs fidaxomicinP=.009; fecal microbiota transplantation vs vancomycin, P=.001; fidaxomicin vs vancomycin, P=.31). Clinical resolution was observed in 92% of participants who received fecal microbiota transplantation (n=22; P=.0002), 42% of participants who were treated with fidaxomicin (n=10; <.0001), and 19% of participants who were treated with vancomycin (n=3; P=.13). No significant differences in results were seen between patients receiving initial fecal microbiota transplantation therapy and those who received rescue treatment with such a transplant.

Of note, adverse events (transient abdominal pain, constipation, bloating and diarrhea) were observed in 10 of the participants who received a fecal microbiota transplant, 1 of which was classified as severe.

Researchers noted limitation of a lack of patients with C difficile ribotype 027, such that results may not be generalizable to settings with a high ribotype 027 frequency. Study interventions were also unblinded, introducing the possibility of observer bias, although the C difficile toxin test was applied to all patients at all time points in an effort to obtain objective outcome measures.

Study investigators concluded, “[fecal microbiota transplantation] was superior to both fidaxomicin and vancomycin monotherapies for [recurrent] CDI, with regard to both combined clinical and microbiological resolution and clinical resolution alone.”

Reference

https://www.infectiousdiseaseadvisor.com/respiratory/new-powder-formulation-tuberculosis-vaccine-candidate-is-in-human-trial/article/829508/

Hvas CL, Jørgensen SMD, Jørgensen SP, et al. Fecal microbiota transplantation is superior to fidaxomicin for treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection [published online January 2, 2019]. Gastroenterology. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2018.12.019

Summit Therapeutics Enters License and Commercialization Agreement with Eurofarama in Latin America to Summit’s Precision Antibiotic ridinilazole in Development for the Treatment of CDI

Summit Therapeutics —  the drug discovery and development company advancing therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Clostridium difficile infection (‘CDI’), announces that it has entered into an exclusive license and commercialization agreement granting Eurofarma Laboratórios SA (‘Eurofarma’) rights in Latin America (the ‘Licensed Territory’) to Summit’s precision antibiotic ridinilazole in development for the treatment of CDI.

Summit retains commercialization rights in all other countries.

ridinilazole is a targeted antibiotic that has the potential as a frontline therapy to treat initial infection and preserve patients’ microbiomes to reduce the rate of recurrent CDI. In a Phase 2 proof of concept trial in CDI patients, ridinilazole demonstrated statistical superiority in sustained clinical response (‘SCR’) rates compared to the standard of care, vancomycin.

ridinilazole is expected to enter Phase 3 clinical trials in the first half of 2018.

“Eurofarma’s established infrastructure and expertise in Latin America are ideally placed to commercialise our novel antibiotic, ridinilazole,” commented Glyn Edwards, Chief Executive Officer of Summit. “This agreement, combined with the recent contract award of up to $62 million from the US Government agency BARDA, will further support the Phase 3 clinical programme and regulatory development of ridinilazole. These partnerships endorse the potential of ridinilazole in the treatment of CDI, and move us a step closer to bringing this antibiotic to patients.”

Eurofarma is a multinational pharmaceutical company with headquarters in Brazil and operations in over 20 countries in South and Central America, the Caribbean and Africa. Eurofarma has a broad portfolio of products across multiple therapeutic areas including a focus in infectious diseases where it markets a number of antibiotics.

“CDI is a serious global healthcare threat including in Latin America,” added Martha Penna, P&D Vice-president of Eurofarma. “Through our interest in bringing innovative products to the region, we were impressed by the efficacy data from the ridinilazole Phase 2 programme and the differentiated profile of the drug. We believe it has the potential to address a major unmet need in CDI, and we look forward to working with Summit to bring ridinilazole to market for the benefit of patients.”

Under the terms of the licence and commercialisation agreement, Summit will receive an upfront payment of $2.5 million, and is entitled to receive a further $3.75 million in development milestones upon the achievement of staged patient enrolment targets in the planned Phase 3 clinical trials of ridinilazole. Summit is eligible to receive up to an additional $21.4 million through other development milestones, commercial milestones, and one-time sales milestones based on cumulative net sales up to $100 million in the Licensed Territory. Further, the agreement provides for product supply transfer payments expected to provide a return equivalent to a high single digit to low double-digit percentage of net sales. For each incremental $100 million in cumulative net sales achieved, Summit is entitled to a further milestone payment which, when combined with the aforementioned product supply transfer payments, is expected to provide a return equivalent to a mid- to high-teens percentage of net sales.

Eurofarma will be responsible for obtaining regulatory approval for ridinilazole in the Licensed Territory. Summit retains full responsibility for the clinical development of ridinilazole in all countries, and is responsible for obtaining regulatory approvals outside of the Eurofarma licensed territories.

A Form 6-K will be filed with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (‘SEC’) that contains additional information about the terms of the licence and commercialisation agreement with Eurofarma.

A copy of this Form 6-K will be available to download either from the Investors section of the Company website at www.summitplc.com or from the SEC website at www.sec.gov.

This announcement contains inside information for the purposes of Article 7 of EU Regulation 596/2014 (MAR).

About Ridinilazole

Ridinilazole is a small molecule precision antibiotic that Summit is developing for the treatment of CDI. In preclinical efficacy studies, ridinilazole exhibited a targeted spectrum of activity that combined a potent bactericidal effect against all clinical isolates of C. difficile tested with minimal impact on other bacteria that are typically found in the gut microbiome. In a Phase 2 proof of concept trial in CDI patients, ridinilazole showed statistical superiority in sustained clinical response (‘SCR’) rates compared to the standard of care, vancomycin. In that trial, SCR was defined as clinical cure at end of treatment and no recurrence of CDI within 30 days of the end of therapy. Ridinilazole was also shown to be highly preserving of the gut microbiome in the Phase 2 proof of concept trial, which was believed to be the reason for the improved clinical outcome for the ridinilazole-treated patients. In addition, ridinilazole preserved the gut microbiome to a greater extent than the marketed narrow-spectrum antibiotic fidaxomicin in an exploratory Phase 2 clinical trial. Ridinilazole, an orally administered small molecule, has received Qualified Infectious Disease Product (‘QIDP’) designation and has been granted Fast Track designation by the US Food and Drug Administration. The QIDP incentives are provided through the US GAIN Act and include an extension of marketing exclusivity for an additional five years upon FDA approval.

About Summit Therapeutics

Summit is a biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery, development and commercialisation of novel medicines for indications for which there are no existing or only inadequate therapies. Summit is conducting clinical programmes focused on the genetic disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the infectious disease C. difficile infection. Further information is available at www.summitplc.com and Summit can be followed on Twitter (@summitplc).

About the Eurofarma Group

As the first 100% Brazilian-owned multinational pharmaceutical company, Eurofarma has been in existence for 45 years, has 6,500 employees, and has operations in 20 Latin American countries. With 12 manufacturing plants in the region, the company has more than 280 products in its portfolio. In 2016, it produced more than 290 million units and reached revenues of R$3.3 billion, 15.7% higher than the previous year. The Group invests approximately 5.5% of its net sales in Research & Development and maintains a pipeline of more than 175 projects.

About Eurofarma Brazil

Considered one of the best companies to work for, Eurofarma Brazil is also considered the most sustainable pharmaceutical company in the country based on an analysis by the Exame Sustainability Guide. With operations in all main pharmaceutical segments including Medical Prescriptions, Generics, Hospital, Oncology, Veterinary, and Bids and Services to Third Parties, Eurofarma has the largest medical advertising salesforce in Brazil with more than 2,000 representatives that together perform 450,000 medical contacts per month. The company has the 4th largest pharmacy system in the country and has a portfolio of medicines that is the 2nd largest by prescription volume.

Vitality Biopharma Researchers Unlock the Use of Cannabinoid Compounds For the Treatment of Microbes Including Clostridium difficile

Vitality Biopharma a corporation dedicated to the development of cannabinoid prodrug pharmaceuticals, and to unlocking the power of cannabinoids for the treatment of serious neurological and inflammatory disorders, today announced that it has obtained positive results demonstrating antimicrobial activity of cannabinoids and filed for patent protection on the use of cannabinoid compounds for the treatment of microbes including Clostridium difficile and other “superbug” pathogens.

Utilizing a list of the top drug-resistant pathogens from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Vitality researchers screened for antimicrobial activity in their portfolio of compounds. Vitality Biopharma discovered new antimicrobial activities for cannabinoids, and as a result has filed for patent protection on the use of cannabinoids and cannabinoid prodrugs for the treatment of multiple pathogenic bacterial infections.

At the top of the CDC’s list is Clostridium difficile (C. diff), which is classified as an urgent threat to human health. The CDC reported in 2015 that it infected almost 500,000 Americans and was directly responsible for 15,000 deaths. Vitality successfully demonstrated antimicrobial reactivity of a cannabinoid against C. diff, and is currently conducting follow-on studies designed to enable pharmaceutical use of their targeted cannabinoid prodrugs for this application.

The Company also confirmed that cannabinoids have antimicrobial activity towards methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a pathogen that was recently listed on the World Health Organization’s (WHO) list of priority pathogens that pose a significant threat to human health globally. Additional antimicrobial activity was seen towards other antibiotic-resistant bacterial species that were included on the CDC and WHO lists, and Vitality is seeking broad intellectual property coverage for use of cannabinoids against these pathogens as well.

“Our cannaboside prodrugs enable the targeted delivery of cannabinoids into the large intestine, where C.diff infections colonize, take over, and can cause severe damage.  Our compounds are uniquely suited for performing this task, and it’s now clear they may provide benefits to gut health through multiple mechanisms.” said Dr. Brandon Zipp, Director of R&D at Vitality.  Robert Brooke, the Company’s CEO, adds that, “This is a logical extension of our work that has been focused on gastrointestinal disease, and represents a new opportunity to treat a serious and life-threatening condition.”

 

To read the article in its entirety, click on the link below:

http://www.dddmag.com/news/2017/05/vitality-biopharma-announces-positive-results-cannabinoid-antibiotics

U.S. Panel To the Food and Drug Administration Voted 10-5 In Favor For Merck & Co. ‘s bezlotoxumab Effective At Preventing A Recurrence Of C. diff. Infection

NewsUpdate

 Merck & Co’s experimental drug to treat the most common hospital-associated infectious diarrhea
* Clostridium difficile  *  warrants approval, an advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Thursday.

 

The panel voted 10-5, with one abstention, that the drug, bezlotoxumab, was effective in preventing a recurrence of infection with Clostridium difficile, or C. difficile, a germ that causes inflammation of the colon and potentially fatal diarrhea.

The FDA is not obliged to follow the advice of its advisory panels but typically does.

The panel’s vote follows an internal review by FDA staff which found an apparent decrease in recurrence of C. difficile but expressed concern as to whether the drug could hurt the cure rate of the initial C. difficile episode.

Panelists who voted in favor of the drug acknowledged the FDA’s concerns but said they were persuaded there was a need for new targeted therapies and this one seems effective.

“We haven’t had a new drug for C. difficile in our armamentarium for some time,” Dr. Joanna Schaenman, assistant professor of medicine at UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, said.

MORE about bezlotoxumab :   https://cdifffoundation.org/category/clinical-trials/

Merck & Co.   bezlotoxumab was successful in two Phase III trials against the recurrence of

Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection when combined with antibiotics.

Currently, there are no therapies approved for the prevention of recurrent disease caused by C. difficile.

Bezlotoxumab’s approval would also make it the first antibody to treat bacterial infection.

Scientists say mAbs would have benefits over small molecule antibiotics because they are less likely to drive antimicrobial resistance and are administered less frequently. “Results of these studies showed that a single, one-time infusion of the antitoxin bezlotoxumab given with standard of care C. difficile antibiotic treatment significantly reduced the recurrence of C. difficile infection compared to standard of care alone, and demonstrated this benefit over a 12-week period,” said lead investigator Mark Wilcox of the University of Leeds, UK. “These results were also demonstrated in patient subgroups known to be at high risk for C. difficile recurrence.”

C. difficile toxin B can damage the gut wall and cause inflammation, leading to the symptoms of C. difficile enteritis, which include abdominal pain and watery diarrhea. Bezlotoxumab, a fully-human monoclonal antibody, was developed by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s MassBiologics Laboratory with Medarex (now part of Bristol-Myers Squibb), and licensed to Merck in 2009.

The studies   Merck’s studies took more than 1,000 patients each and evaluated them over 12 weeks. Participants received either a single infusion of bezlotoxumab, actoxumab (another mAb designed to fight C. difficile),a combination of the two, or a placebo. The actoxumab arm of the study ended early for efficacy and safety reasons.    Both studies had infection recurrence as their primary endpoint – this rate was significantly lower for the bezlotoxumab arms (17.4% and 15.7%) and bezlotoxumab plus actoxumab arms (15.9% and 14.9%), compared to placebos (27.6% and 25.7%). Actoxumab was found not to provide extra benefit on its own or combined with bezlotoxumab, so Merck’s marketing authorisation application is for bezlotoxumab alone.

The FDA is due to make its decision by July 23.

 

TO READ ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW:

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/health/us-regulatory-panel-backs/2860152.html