Category Archives: Health & Wellness Information

Home Care Items That Should Not Be Kept In the Bathroom

Did You Know…………..

Bathrooms are the perfect breeding ground for mold and mildew, and your towels are easily susceptible to these gross fungi. It’s fine to keep one towel hung up in the bathroom, as long as you swap it out once a week. Turning on an exhaust fan can help dry out the room and your damp towel faster. It is best to store extra towels in a well ventilated closet.

And because there are so many robes today made out of the same material towels are made from — it is best to keep bathrobes out of the bathroom.  Damp robes could harbor bacteria, and humidity can give them a musty odor. Let them dry in your closet instead of on a hook in your bathroom.

 

 

 

Laundry:
While combating C. diff at home, it is recommended that soiled linens be handled as little as possible to prevent microbial contamination of persons handling the linen. Heavily soiled linens should be either discarded or laundered separately and not with other clothing or other linens.

Satisfactory Laundering has been achieved in “hot” water temperatures cycles in home washers while utilizing chlorine bleach products (amount varies with manufacturer and water capacity in each washer and laundry soap.

For additional infection prevention and Home Care information please visit the

Home Care Page

Please — Do Not Take Medicine Into Your Own Hands, You Are NOT Out Of Options

Do-It-Yourself Treatments Could Be Fatal……

You are NOT out of options………………………

During these unprecedented times, we understand the patient’s frustration and how this pandemic has created a halt to the readily accessible alternative treatment option in the FMT community.   The need for continued treatments for a C. diff. infection and recurrent C. diff. infections are real and necessary. We also understand how patients experiencing
recurrent C. difficile infections are desperately seeking the FMT alternative treatment.

C Diff Foundation is able to provide information about treatments available to safely treat  CDI’s and recurrent C. diff. infections.

Most home remedies or natural therapies, though, haven’t been put through the same rigorous clinical testing you expect from pharmaceutical medications.

In a world where you can fix almost anything with a do-it-yourself video on YouTube, you might think curing your own illness would be a piece of cake. It might be if it weren’t for a couple of (not so small) sticking points.  One, the home remedy recommended by your friend — or one of the many websites promoting “natural therapies” — might not work.1  Dr. Harriet Hall, a retired family physician, former Air Force flight surgeon, and author of the SkepDoc column in Skeptic magazine, is one of those leading the charge against medical “treatments” not supported by science.  Like others in the medical and scientific community, ……. There is the only medicine that has been tested and proven to work, and medicine that hasn’t,” Hall told Healthline. 1

Talk to your medical professional/s.

Discuss medications and clinical trials available.

Do Not Share Antibiotics.

Responses to an anonymous online questionnaire of 496 parents, researchers at the Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York reported that 48 percent of the parents surveyed said they’ve held onto leftover antibiotics. More troubling to researchers was that of those parents, 73 percent reported giving those antibiotics to siblings, unrelated children, and unrelated adults.  This would sometimes occur months after the drugs were originally prescribed.
Dr. Ruth Milanaik, director of the neonatal neurodevelopment follow-up program at Cohen and senior author of the study, says the results show an “alarming” percentage of parents engaging in sharing or borrowing antibiotics, a practice known as prescription diversion.  “This is dangerous not only for those given antibiotics that weren’t prescribed for them but for entire populations of people who some antibiotics may no longer help when the bacteria they target become resistant to them,” Milanaik said in a statement. 2

Discuss Resources available.

Times are trying during these unprecedented times and you are not without hope – we would like to help you and not see you get hurt or even worse. Please take time to speak to your treating physician and consider contacting a C Diff Foundation Triage Nurse at 727-205-3922 to learn more about safe and effective treatments available and options available to you at this time of desperation.

Remember – You  Are Not Out of Options.

Stay safe – and please – Do NOT take medicine into your own hands.

Thank You!

Resources:
1 Foxnews.com
2 Healthline.com

 

 

Racing the Tract app Is An Educational Game For All Ages

 

 

 

 

Created by Teena Chopra, MD, MPH

Racing The Tract

Available on Apple Store

‎Educational, fun, and free! Welcome to Racing the Tract, a fun and educational game that teaches you how to maintain a healthy Gut Microbiome by making healthy diet and lifestyle choices, and answering trivia questions. Make it to the end of the race track by gaining good bacteria points.

Cost:  FREE

 

How To Wash Your Hands Correctly

How do I wash my hands correctly?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

  1. Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
  2. Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  3. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  4. Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
  5. Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them, and use a paper towel to turn off the faucet, and then throw it away.

How do I clean my hands without soap or water?
If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of germs on hands in some situations, but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs.

  • Apply the product to the palm of one hand.
  • Rub your hands together.
  • Rub the product over all surfaces of your hands and fingers until your until your hands are dry.

Take a minute and enjoy the brief informational hand-washing video

Good Handwashing Is the BEST way to stay healthy

 

 

How To Wash Your Hands Correctly

How do I wash my hands correctly?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

  1. Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
  2. Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  3. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  4. Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
  5. Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them, and use a paper towel to turn off the faucet, and then throw it away.

How do I clean my hands without soap or water?
If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of germs on hands in some situations, but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs.

  • Apply the product to the palm of one hand.
  • Rub your hands together.
  • Rub the product over all surfaces of your hands and fingers until your until your hands are dry.

Take a minute and enjoy the brief informational hand-washing video

Good Handwashing Is the BEST way to stay healthy