Category Archives: Health & Wellness Information

Changing the Bed Linens In Sickness and In Health

According to Microbiologist, Phillip Tierno of New York University

our bed linens can “quickly blossom into a botanical park of bacteria and fungus.”

If left for too long, the microscopic life within the wrinkles and folds of our bed sheets can even make us sick,

> We can recall – years ago – the bed linens in any acute care facility (e.g., hospital) the bed linens were changed daily.   Food for thought <<

 

Humans naturally produce roughly 26 gallons of sweat in bed every year. When it’s hot and humid outside, this moisture becomes what scientists call an “ideal fungal culture medium.”

In a recent study that assessed the level of fungal contamination in bedding, researchers found that a test sample of feather and synthetic pillows that were 1 1/2 to 20 years old contained as many as 16 species of fungus each.

And it’s not just your own microbial life you’re sleeping with. In addition to the fungi and bacteria that come from your sweat, sputum, skin cells, and vaginal and anal excretions, you also share your bed with foreign microbes.

These include animal dander, pollen, soil, lint, dust mite debris and feces, and finishing agents from whatever your sheets are made from, to name a few.

Tierno says all that gunk becomes “significant” in as little as a week. And unclean bedding still exposes you to materials that can trigger the sniffing and sneezing, since the microbes are so close to your mouth and nose that you’re almost forced to breathe them in.

“Even if you don’t have allergies per se, you can have an allergic response,” Tierno said.

Another reason your sheets get dirty quickly has little to do with your behavior or sweat patterns — the issue is simply gravity.

“Just like Rome over time was buried with the debris that falls from gravity, gravity is what brings all that material into your mattress,” Tierno said.

One to two weeks of this buildup is enough to leave anyone with a scratchy throat — especially those with significant allergies or asthma. (One in six Americans has allergies.)

“If you touched dog poo in the street, you’d want to wash your hands,” Tierno said.

“Consider that analogous to your bedding. If you saw what was there — but of course you don’t see it — after a while you have to say to yourself, ‘Do I want to sleep in that?’

So what does Dr. Tierno suggest?

To stem the invisible tide, he said, sheets should be washed once a week — >> More Often when bed linens are visibly soiled and an infection is being treated <<


Proper ways to handle soiled linens:

There is now a common understanding that linens, once in use, are usually contaminated and could be harboring microorganisms such as MRSA and VRE.

Further, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cautions that healthcare professionals should “handle contaminated textiles and fabrics with a minimum agitation to avoid contamination of air, surfaces, and persons.” Even one of the leading nursing textbooks, Fundamentals of Nursing, states, “Soiled linen is never shaken in the air because shaking can disseminate secretions and excretions and the micro organisms they contain.” This text also states, “…linens that have been soiled with excretions and secretions harbor microorganisms … can be transmitted to others.”

According to Fundamentals of Nursing, when handling linens in any acute care and healthcare facility:

1. You should always wash your hands after handling a patient’s bed linens.

2. You should hold soiled linen away from your uniform.

3. Soiled linen is never shaken in the air because shaking can disseminate the micro-organisms they contain.

4. Linen from one patient’s bed is never (even momentarily) placed on another patient’s bed.

5. Soiled linens should be placed directly into a portable linen hamper or tucked into a pillowcase and the end of the bed before it is gathered up for disposal in the linen hamper or linen chute.

 

To read this article in its entirety – please click on the following link:

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-often-to-wash-bed-sheets-2017-6

 

WHO’s World Hand Hygiene Day In Conjunction With Fight Antibiotic Resistance – It’s In Your Hands

SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands

WHO’s global annual call to action for health workers


SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands 5 May 2017 – Fight antibiotic resistance – it’s in your hands

The WHO’s calls to action are:

  • Health workers: “Clean your hands at the right times and stop the spread of antibiotic resistance.”
  • Hospital Chief Executive Officers and Administrators: “Lead a year-round infection prevention and control programme to protect your patients from resistant infections.”
  • Policy makers: “Stop antibiotic resistance spread by making infection prevention and hand hygiene a national policy priority.”
  • IPC leaders: “Implement WHO’s Core Components for infection prevention, including hand hygiene, to combat antibiotic resistance.”

Every 5 May, WHO urges all health workers and leaders to maintain the profile of hand hygiene action to save patient lives. Being part of the WHO SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands campaign means that people can access important information to help in their practice. This year Pr Pittet and three leading surgeons explain why hand hygiene at the right times in surgical care is life saving.

 

 

Le 5 mai de chaque année, l’OMS exhorte tous les travailleurs et responsables de santé à maintenir haut le profil de la promotion des bonnes pratiques d’hygiène des mains afin de sauver la vie de patients. Faire partie de la campagne Pour Sauver des Vies: l’Hygiène des Mains signifie que soignants et collaborateurs de santé peuvent accéder à des informations importantes pour améliorer leurs pratiques. Cette année, le Pr Pittet et trois chirurgiens de renommée internationale expliquent pourquoi l’hygiène des mains au bon moment au cours des soins chirurgicaux sauve des vies.

 

5 Moments for Hand Hygiene

The My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene approach defines the key moments when health-care workers should perform hand hygiene.

This evidence-based, field-tested, user-centred approach is designed to be easy to learn, logical and applicable in a wide range of settings.

This approach recommends health-care workers to clean their hands

  • before touching a patient,
  • before clean/aseptic procedures,
  • after body fluid exposure/risk,
  • after touching a patient, and
  • after touching patient surroundings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For further Information on WHO My 5 Moments for Hand
Hygiene visit:
To download hand hygiene reminder tools for the workplace visit:
To access WHO hand hygiene improvement tools and resources for use
all year round visit:
To see the latest number of hospitals and health care facilities which
have signed up to support the campaign visit:

 

Home Health Care Information for Both Physicians and Patients

What is Home Health Care?

At its basic level, “home health care” means exactly what it sounds like – medical care provided in a patient’s home. Home health care can include a range of  care given by skilled medical professionals, including skilled nursing care, physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy. Home health care can also include skilled, non-medical care, such as medical social services or assistance with daily personal activities provided by a highly qualified home health aide.

As the Medicare program describes, home health care is unique as a care setting not only because the care is provided in the home, but the care itself is “usually less expensive, more convenient, and just as effective” as care given in a hospital or skilled nursing facility.

When we say “home care” a common thought is senior care.  However; in  today’s society wellness draining diagnosis occur in every age group. Some of the more chronic, long-term illnesses greatly benefit from receiving home health care vs extended stays in acute care facilities and other health care in-patient services depending upon individual living situations and over-all health conditions.

Who qualifies for Home Health Care?

Each individual must contact their insurance provider to inquire about this skilled care provided within their home.  There may be co-pays per visit, limitations of the number of visits per episode and per calendar year, there may additional stipulations and should be understood by the patient and their families prior to discussing with a Medicare enrolled Physician.

To be eligible for Medicare home health services a patient must have Medicare Part A

and/or Part B.

To  be eligible for Home Health Care Services: (1)

  • Be confined to home.
  • Need Skilled Services.
  • Be Under the Care Of a Medicare -enrolled Physician.
  • Receive Services Under a Plan Of Care Established and Reviewed by a Physician and Have Had a Face-to-Face Encounter With a Physician or Allowed Non-Physician Practioner (NPP).  Care Must Be Furnished By or Under Arrangements Made by A Medicare-Participating Home  Home Health Agency (HHA).
  • Patient Eligibility—Confined to Home
    Section 1814(a) and Section 1835(a)
    of the Act specify that an

    individual is considered
    confined to the home” (homebound) if the following two criteria are met:
    First Criteria: One of the Following must be met:
    1. Because of illness or injury, the individual needs the aid of supportive devices such as crutches, canes, wheelchairs, and walkers; the use of special transportation; or the
    assistance of another person to leave their place of residence
    2.  Have a condition such that leaving his or her home is medically contraindicated.

    Second Criteria Both of the following must be met:
    1. There must exist a normal inability to leave home.
    2. Leaving home must require a considerable and taxing effort.

     

     

    Home Health Aids May Be Included In the Home Health Care Assessment and Assigned To Assist With Personal Care – Activities of Daily Living  (ADL’s), Bathing, Feeding, Dressing, and Walking.

    To learn more about Home Health Care Nursing and being treated in the home environment, listen to Linda Jablonski, MS, BSN, RN-BC – Director of Nursing Home Health.   Click on the C.diff. radio logo below to listen to the podcast.

    cdiffRadioLogoMarch2015

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

(1) CMS  (article se1436)  https://www.cms.gov/Outreach-and-Education/Medicare-Learning-Network-MLN/MLNMattersArticles/Downloads/se1436.pdf

MD Peer Exchange Focus On Clostridium difficile Infections

mdmag

Courtesy of MDMag .com

MD Magazine

 

 

Listen and View Panelists:  Peter L. Salgo, MD; Erik Dubberke, MD; Lawrence J. Brandt, MD; Dale N. Gerding, MD; and Daniel E. Freedberg, MD, MS,

Topic of discussion:  Understanding Why Clostridium difficile Infections (CDI) Occur In the Community

The second video the panelists discuss:

The Pathophysiology of Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI)  and Its Impact On the Gastrointestinal System.

See more at: http://www.mdmag.com/peer-exchange/clostridium-difficile-infections/understanding-why-clostridium-difficile-infections-occur-in-the-community#sthash.r4Z6jNwk.dpuf

 

 

Bridging Collaboration Between Patients and Healthcare Providers to Reduce Hospital-Acquired Infections

cdiffRadioLogoMarch2015

C. diff. Spores and More” Global Broadcasting Network
will host a special episode on their live radio program (cdiffradio.com)
airing on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 at 1:00 pm EST featuring world-renowned
infectious disease expert, Dr. Hudson Garrett Jr., Global Chief Clinical Officer for Pentax Medical-Hoya Corporation and Chairperson of the Clinical Education Committee
for the C Diff Foundation.

This special episode, Bridging Collaboration Between Patients and Healthcare Providers to Reduce Hospital-Acquired Infections (HAI’s),  will feature a robust discussion on the patient’s role in preventing healthcare associated infections, an overview of medical device hygiene and infection control, the importance of antibiotic stewardship, and applications of evidence-based infection control measures across the entire healthcare continuum of care.

“Healthcare continues to become more and more complex as the acuity and needs of the patient changes along with the correlating technologies. Patients and Healthcare Providers must work together to mitigate the risk for Healthcare Associated Infections and other adverse events,” says Dr. Garrett.

C. diff. Spores and More ™“ spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the
C. diff.
community and more.

Through the interviews, the C Diff Foundation’s mission connects, educates, and empowers listeners worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

 

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

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Clorox Healthcare, Sponsor of C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network

CloroxHealthcare_72

Partners In Hope For the Holidays Worldwide

Have you or a loved one has been affected by a catastrophic illness or in the fight of combating a C.diff. infection, or any long-term illness?

This holiday season might not feel like the “most wonderful time of the year.”

Instead of joy, one may be struggling with sadness or anxiety trying to understand that  spending the holidays in the traditional, old fashion ways is a challenge. There may be worries about money, time, or energy to partake in the holidays.

There are ways to help make the most of the holiday season.

Begin with setting realistic goals, starting new holiday traditions, and calling for help when it is needed most are the first steps in helping to cope. Below are several tips from mental health experts that will be useful to anyone while fighting any illness.

Set Realistic Goals: This may not be the best holiday but with a positive outlook, and the support of family and friends, one can still make the most of it. Adapting to setbacks after or during an illness can cause stress, anxiety, and sadness. Try to be realistic about gift-giving and affordability and what can be done around the holidays, and share your thoughts with friends and family. Being honest about feelings and the present circumstances can help you better cope and give everyone the chance to have a better understanding. Make time to have a conversation will be very beneficial. Enjoy sharing the holidays, make  precious moments into wonderful memories.

Start New Traditions: If you are celebrating the holidays away from your own home or away from loved ones, start a new tradition to help yourself and your family adjust to the changes. Activities like singing holiday songs or reading books aloud can help you maintain a positive outlook. Trying something new can create positive results. The new traditions will help create something special.

Surround Yourself with Support: The holidays can be a difficult for adults and children. When an individual is feeling down, lacking energy, in pain, combating an infection of any kind – one tends to isolate themselves. Do the best to avoid too much alone time, and talk to someone about how you are feeling. You are not alone and there are local numbers available in all areas to call for confidential crisis counseling and emotional support.

CONTACT USA (CUSA) is a network of crisis intervention helpline centers across the nation providing help by telephone and online chat for those in need of help.   http://www.contact-usa.org/programs.html

Treat Yourself with Care: It is important to pay attention to your own needs and feelings. Doing so will help you cope with stress caused by the holidays. If you are a parent or caregiver, it is important for you to take care of your needs first. Then you will be better able to take care of those who depend on you.

Reach Out for Help: Recovery takes time after any illness – it is common to feel a lot of different emotions – anger, sadness, anxiety, confusion, guilt, and bitterness during and after suffering from a long term illness.

Take it one-day-at-a-time………. live life in the moment and take it one step at a time.

A Collaboration Between LifePoint Health and Duke University Health System Successful At Driving Down Hospital-Acquired Infection Rates

Clinch Valley Medical Center has demonstrated its commitment to putting patients first and keeping quality front and center.

Clinch Valley Medical Center (CVMC) today announced that it has been named a Duke LifePoint Quality Affiliate. This designation recognizes hospitals within the LifePoint Health system that have enrolled in the LifePoint National Quality Program and succeeded in transforming their culture of safety and achieving high standards of quality care, performance improvement and patient engagement.

“LifePoint’s operations are defined by our mission of Making Communities Healthier and our relentless pursuit of quality”

“Our hospital is committed to establishing safe, reliable, high-quality standards of care to ensure that members of our community can be confident in the service and care they receive when they come through our doors,” said Peter Mulkey, chief executive officer of Clinch Valley Medical Center. “Earning the esteemed Duke LifePoint Quality Affiliate designation further demonstrates our dedication to putting our patients and their families first, and I am so grateful for the hard work of each and every member of our team who has helped us reach this milestone.”

CVMC is a 175-bed hospital that has served people in the Richlands, Va., community and surrounding areas for more than 75 years. To achieve Duke LifePoint Quality Affiliate designation, the CVMC team worked to implement a number of best practices and launch new initiatives to engage patients and families, enhance patient safety and improve quality care.

For example, the CVMC leadership team instituted daily executive patient safety rounding to ensure that leaders at every level of the organization engage with staff, physicians, patients and families about quality and patient safety. CVMC also implemented bedside shift reporting to help ensure clear communication, reduce the risk of errors and maintain consistency of care during shift changes. Bedside shift reporting is an effective method for transferring information from one provider to another, while also involving the patient in discussions about their health, progress and treatment plan.

Additionally, CVMC implemented a Safety Collaborative designed to help prevent potential healthcare-acquired conditions. As a result of this effort, the hospital has achieved zero incidences of central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSI), clostridium difficile (C. diff), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and post-operative infections, among other conditions, in the last 12 months.

“CONGRATULATIONS!”

CVMC also established a community collaboration called the “Bridge Program” to help reduce readmissions. The program connects patients with various community resources and support to help ensure a smooth transition from the hospital to the home setting.

“LifePoint’s operations are defined by our mission of Making Communities Healthier and our relentless pursuit of quality,” said David Dill, president and chief operating officer of LifePoint Health. “By becoming a Duke LifePoint Quality Affiliate, Clinch Valley Medical Center has demonstrated its commitment to putting patients first and keeping quality front and center.

As only the third LifePoint facility in the country to earn designation to date, it has set the bar high for our hospitals that will follow in its footsteps along this quality journey.”

The LifePoint National Quality Program was created through a collaboration between LifePoint Health and Duke University Health System.

When hospitals enroll in the program, they begin working with Duke and LifePoint quality coaches to evaluate and strengthen their quality programs and processes.

Following an initial evaluation, the hospital creates a plan and begins to deploy changes that will help it achieve quality improvement benchmarks and establish long-term solutions to sustain its results.

In addition to evaluating common quality care and patient safety metrics, the LifePoint National Quality Program focuses foundation elements required to sustain quality care, including committed leadership, systems to ensure continuous performance and process improvement, and a culture dedicated to safety. Duke LifePoint Quality Affiliate designation denotes those hospitals that achieve a broad range of criteria in each of these areas and demonstrate a capacity to continuously measure and improve what they do.

About Clinch Valley Medical Center

Clinch Valley Medical Center in Richlands, Va., is a 175-bed acute care hospital, which offers comprehensive cancer services; specialty care for the heart, lungs and vascular system; emergency services; inpatient and outpatient physical rehabilitation; sleep studies; skilled nursing; pediatrics; obstetrics and advanced diagnostics. More information is available at www.clinchvalleymedicalcenter.com.

About LifePoint Health

LifePoint Health  is a leading healthcare company dedicated to Making Communities Healthier®. Through its subsidiaries, it provides quality inpatient, outpatient and post-acute services close to home. LifePoint owns and operates community hospitals, regional health systems, physician practices, outpatient centers, and post-acute facilities in 22 states. It is the sole community healthcare provider in the majority of the non-urban communities it serves. More information about the company can be found at www.LifePointHealth.net

 

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20161012005331/en/Clinch-Valley-Medical-Center-Named-Duke-LifePoint