Tag Archives: Patient safety

Infectious Disease Research Finds the Laundering of Removable Bed Barriers More Effective at Reducing Hospital-Acquired Infections Keeping Patients Safe

Infectious disease research highlights that laundering removable bed barriers is more effective at reducing hospital-acquired infections and keeping patients safe

A new peer-reviewed study published today in Sage Journals’ Infectious Disease Research and Treatment publication, found that cleaning and disinfecting mattresses by using removable, launderable bed barriers is more effective at eliminating bacteria that cause C. diff, MRSA, and E.coli than manual processes using chemical disinfectants. These findings indicate a new, much-needed industry best practice that hospitals must adopt to keep patients safe – especially in today’s COVID-19 reality as more patients begin to re-enter hospitals and resume elective procedures.

Most hospitals currently conduct a manual one-step process of cleaning hospital beds and mattresses, despite being off-label use of the disinfectant and the manufacturer’s multi-step instructions for cleaning and disinfection. Studies have also shown that mattresses, which are difficult to disinfect, contribute to the high rates of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) in the United States. These concerns prompted ECRI to cite mattress contamination as one of its top health hazards in both 2018 and 2019.

“We evaluated the effectiveness of the commercial laundry process under extreme test conditions, using high concentrations of soilage, blood, and urine. Laundering the removable bed barriers eliminated every major organism that contributes to HAIs—when the fabric was tested both at the beginning and end of life of the barrier,” said Edmond Hooker, MD, DrPH, an epidemiologist and practicing physician who co-authored the study, “The findings are both significant and timely as hospitals grapple with growing concerns about patient safety and how to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and other diseases. The time is now to take action and protect patients with this evidenced-based approach to cleaning and disinfecting.”

The commercial laundry process detailed in the study provides detergent, bleach, agitation, and repeatability. These elements allow bacteria and spores to be physically separated from the barrier surface. The chlorine works to kill residual organisms. Multiple rinse cycles allow the microorganisms to be removed from the washing machine.

“The current state of cleaning and disinfecting beds and mattresses is dangerous because it can leave residual bacteria that can be transmitted from patient to patient. However, laundering removable bed barriers provides an alternative. It eliminates issues with insufficient removal of pathogens from the patient surface, ” said Ardis Hoven, MD, Professor of Medicine at the University of Kentucky and an Infectious Disease consultant to the Kentucky Department for Public Health. “Unlike the commonly used manual process, it exceeded FDA guidance on this type of device. Hospital administrators must translate this new knowledge into action to protect the patients and families they serve.”

Trinity Guardion, the maker of the Soteria Bed Barrier – a removable and launderable bed barrier – sponsored the study. Dr. Hooker is a professor at Xavier University’s Department of Healthcare Administration and associate professor at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. To view the full study results, please visit the publication website.

 

To read the publication in its entirety please visit

www.trinityguardion.com

 

Edmond A. Hooker, MD, DrPH and Nancy Foster, VP, Quality and Patient Safety Policy, American Hospital Association Discuss the CMS 2019 Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) on ‘C.diff. Spores and More’ Radio on July 3rd

Listen in on Tuesday, July 3rd at 1:00 p.m. ET

C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network©

www.cdiffradio.com

Hosted by the C Diff Foundation   brought to you by VoiceAmerica and sponsored by Clorox Healthcare

Our guests Edmond A. Hooker, MD, DrPH and Nancy Foster, Vice President, Quality and Patient Safety Policy, American Hospital Association will be discussing the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,  CMS 2019 Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) proposed rule – which includes proposals to de-duplicate measures across the five hospital quality reporting programs.

This special live broadcast discussion will be about the CMS’ recent proposals for Healthcare-associated infection (HAI) measures and to provide facts that will bring forth a better understanding of the proposed rule.

Guest Information:

Eddie Hooker, MD, DrPH,  is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Services Administration at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio. He is also an Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Louisville and at Wright State University. His areas of expertise include emergency medicine, epidemiology, health-services management, and public health.

Dr. Hooker received his BS degree from Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia. He earned his MD degree from Eastern Virginia Medical School. He then completed his residency training in Emergency Medicine at the University of Louisville. As a full-time faculty member at the University of Louisville from 1991 until 1996, Dr. Hooker served as an Associate Professor and Director of Resident Research. He was very active in brain trauma and stroke research. Dr. Hooker most recently practiced emergency medicine at a private hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was active cardiac research.   Since 2005, Dr. Hooker has been teaching in the Department of Health Services Administration at Xavier University. In the spring of 2007, Dr. Hooker earned his Doctorate in Public Health from the University of Kentucky.

Dr. Hooker continues to be active in emergency medicine and public-health research. He has authored more than 20 publications in leading emergency-medicine journals, published many book chapters, and continues to have an active research agenda. Dr. Hooker serves as an editor for Emedicine, an online clinical knowledge base. He is the medical advisor for Indian Hill Schools.

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Nancy Foster is the Vice President for Quality and Patient Safety Policy at the American Hospital Association. In this role, she provides advice to public policymakers on legislation and regulations intended to improve patient safety and quality in America’s hospitals. Foster is the AHA’s point person at the National Quality Forum, the Hospital Workgroup of the Measures Application Partnership, and is the liaison to the Joint Commission’s Board, and represents hospital perspectives at many national meetings.

Prior to joining the AHA, Foster was the Coordinator for Quality Activities at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). In this role, she was the principal staff person for the Quality Interagency Coordination Task Force, which brought Federal agencies with health care responsibilities together to coordinate their work and engage in projects to improve quality and safety. She also led the development of patient safety research agenda for AHRQ and managed a portfolio of quality and safety research grants in excess of $10 million.

She is a graduate of Princeton University and has completed graduate work at Chapman University and Johns Hopkins University. In 2000, she was chosen as an Excellence in Government Leadership Fellow.

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California Hemet Valley Medical Center Adds UV Technology to Enhance Patient Safety

Hemet Valley Medical Center has implemented innovative ultraviolet technology with the addition of the Clorox Healthcare® Optimum-UV® System. The system helps remove harmful bacteria and pathogens that can jeopardize health, providing patients, visitors and staff with an additional layer of safety and protection.

Medical Mattresses; Healthcare-acquired Infections and How Hospital Bedding Is Involved

Our guests Dr. Edmond Hooker, MD with Bruce Rippe, CEO of Trinity Guardion and  J. Darrel Hicks, BA, Master REH, CHESP joined us on C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network live broadcast –August 1st  to  discuss Healthcare – associated Infections (HAIs ) and how they lead to more than 720,000 illnesses and 75,000 deaths a year. In fact, more people die from HAIs each year than from automobile accidents. Furthermore, HAIs are a huge financial burden, adding $30 billion to annual healthcare costs. The American-made Trinity Patient Protection System gives hospitals the solution they need to reduce and eliminate HAIs.

Launderable, reusable, cost-effective and eco-friendly, the Trinity System’s fluid-proof covers fit around beds, pillows, stretchers and physical therapy tables. Unlike typical disinfectant agents designed for hard surfaces, the Trinity System keeps bacteria off the porous surface of the mattress, as well as, the bed deck. When laundered to CDC standards, the Trinity System removes 99.99% of bacteria and has been proven to reduce C. diff infection rates by about 50%.

 

www.trinityguardion.com

 

To learn more, from these leading topic-experts, about Medical Mattress Contamination and how bedding is involved in healthcare-associated infections.

Listen to the podcast available and part of the C.diff. Spores and More living library.

https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/100501/healthcare-acquired-infections-and-how-hospital-bedding-is-involved

6th Graders Receive Up Close and Personal Education with a Light-Pulsing, Disinfecting Robot

Sharing and Educating

Opening eyes of the young with disinfecting

technology being utilized to combat “superbugs.”

 

The only robot in the Verdugo region that zaps away unwanted bacteria and viruses from hospital rooms arrived at USC-Verdugo Hills Hospital two weeks ago.

The Xenex robot emits a pulsating, bright white UV-C light — which is a short, wavelength, ultraviolet light that can save lives. Once surfaces are exposed to the robot’s rays, harmful bacteria and viruses die, greatly reducing the odds patients will be infected with hospital-acquired infections, including those caused by superbugs such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, known as MRSA.

USC-Verdugo Hills Hospital employees joined Xenex employees at Fremont Elementary School, where they showcased the $100,000 machine in teacher Mallory Kane’s sixth-grade classroom, the same place where Keith Hobbs, chief executive of Verdugo Hills Hospital, was a sixth-grader in 1979. “There’s no other place that I would rather be than to come back to my alma mater and share this R2D2, bug-zapping machine with you guys,” Hobbs said.

The Xenex robot pulses UV-C light 67 times per second, and hospital staff take precautions when they operate it because the light can harm their eyes.

“This is not any light bulb in your house,” said Mary Virgallito, director of patient safety for the hospital. “It’s actually filled with a gas called xenon.”

Virgallito said hospital employees manually clean rooms before they activate Xenex. It takes the robot about 15 minutes to clean a patient’s room, and 20 minutes to disinfect an operating room.Hobbs said mothers ask if they can borrow the robot to disinfect their own homes, and Kane suggested it would be helpful in the classroom. Over the past several weeks, many of her students missed school because they were sick.

Jeff Mamalakis, business development manager for Xenex, volunteered to disinfect Kane’s room when school let out. The space would be left with a scent as if lightning had just struck, Virgallito said.  The impromptu high-tech, germ-cleansing session was a dream come true for Kane.

“In sixth grade, the curriculum moves so quickly that even missing one day puts kids so far behind,” Kane said. “Having our classroom disinfected every day would be a dream come true. My kids would be here, everyone would be happy, no one would have to miss school.”

To Read the article in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/uhc-most-xenex-germ-zapping-144500378.html;_ylt=A0LEV18lQNBY2KgA6FZXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTEzMXBobHNmBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDVUkwMkM0XzEEc2VjA3Nj