Category Archives: Raising C Diff Awareness Education

Have You Been Treated For a C. diff. Infection? Take a Brief Survey To Help Improve Education for C.diff. Patients and Caretakers

 
The C.diff Foundation is working with a partner to conduct a survey about your experience with a C.diff. infection to help inform educational initiatives for C.diff patients and caretakers.

If you or someone you know has had a personal experience with a C.diff, infection please go to our website, www.cdifffoundation.org, and take the short survey.

Thank you for making a difference and shaping the future of C. diff. infection prevention education.

 

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Denise Graham, Assistant Public Relations

We are pleased to welcome Denise Graham
to the C Diff Foundation.

Denise Graham, Founder and President of DDG Associates, formerly the Executive Vice President to the Association for Professionals in Infection Control (APIC) and Epidemiology, led the nation’s public reporting initiative thereby enabling her to work closely with all agencies falling under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  Her expertise in this arena continues by assisting clients with ongoing changes such as value-based purchasing and guidelines coming from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

With greater than twenty years of experience in the healthcare industry, Denise has formed key working relationships with numerous leading experts.

Denise comes to the C Diff Foundation as Assistant Public Relations Coordinator  to introduce the organization with greater visibility and continued growth in educating and advocating for C.difficile Infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety and support worldwide.

To contact Denise:, please e-mail her at:    denise@cdifffoundation.org

C Diff Foundation Announces Scholarship Program to Support Health Care Students Worldwide

C Diff Foundation is pleased to announce the Michael and Helen Caralla, Sr. Educational Scholarship program. The scholarship program is to help health care students succeed and reach their educational goals.

Michael and Helen Caralla, Sr.
To apply for a C Diff Foundation
Michael and Helen Caralla, Sr. Educational Scholarship,
the applicant must submit an application
by May 1 of each calendar year.

 

 

 

 

 

The C Diff Foundation selection committee chooses application recipients based on a submitted essay, letters of recommendation, a willingness to complete the Volunteer Service project to promote C. difficile infection awareness requirement, and financial need.

Awards consist of annual scholarships that range in value from $750 to $1,500 USD.   Recipients must reapply each year they attend post-secondary school and will be chosen based on their academic progress and mentoring performance.

To be eligible for a Michael and Helen Caralla, Sr. Educational Scholarship the applicant must be:

  • A student and a high school graduate or have a General Educational Development a.k.a. General Educational Diploma (GED).
  • Enrolled full-time at an accredited post-secondary educational institution during the 2017-2018 academic year (If a foreign student is applying and is chosen, the educational scholarship awarded amount will be converted from USD to the educational institute location foreign currency exchange rate and proof of country residency must be provided).
  • Maintain full-time status throughout the 2017-2018 academic year in order to remain eligible.
  • Willing to complete a minimum of 50 volunteer hours promoting C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety awareness in their local communities per academic year awarded the educational scholarship.

C. difficile infections can be acquired and diagnosed in infants and across the life-span with a higher risk involving our senior citizens and that is why it is imperative to learn about a C. difficile infection, its most common symptoms, the treatments available, and environmental safety products to prevent the spread of this spore-bacteria and to help reduce C. difficile infection recurrences.

“When you apply to become a C Diff Foundation Scholar, you are taking the first step to determine your own future. The C Diff Foundation Scholars are individuals motivated and dedicated to making a difference in the health care community. We are excited to offer a scholarship program to help support health care students to advance their career path through the Michael and Helen Caralla, Sr. educational scholarship, a program in memory of our loving parents,” states Nancy C Caralla, Executive Director.

About the C Diff Foundation:
The C Diff Foundation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit, founded in 2012 by Nancy C Caralla, a nurse diagnosed and treated for Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections.

Through her own CDI journeys and witnessing the passing of her father, diagnosed with sepsis secondary to C. difficile infection involvement, Nancy recognized the need for greater awareness through education, the research being conducted by the government, industry, and academia and better advocacy on behalf of patients, healthcare professionals, and researchers worldwide working to address the public health threat posed by this devastating infection.

For additional Scholar Applicant information, visit the C Diff Foundation website

https://cdifffoundation.org/scholarship-eligibility/

Media Coordinator:
Denise Graham, RN
denise@cdifffoundation.org

Twitter: @cdiffFoundation #CdiffScholar

 

WHO’s World Hand Hygiene Day In Conjunction With Fight Antibiotic Resistance – It’s In Your Hands

SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands

WHO’s global annual call to action for health workers


SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands 5 May 2017 – Fight antibiotic resistance – it’s in your hands

The WHO’s calls to action are:

  • Health workers: “Clean your hands at the right times and stop the spread of antibiotic resistance.”
  • Hospital Chief Executive Officers and Administrators: “Lead a year-round infection prevention and control programme to protect your patients from resistant infections.”
  • Policy makers: “Stop antibiotic resistance spread by making infection prevention and hand hygiene a national policy priority.”
  • IPC leaders: “Implement WHO’s Core Components for infection prevention, including hand hygiene, to combat antibiotic resistance.”

Every 5 May, WHO urges all health workers and leaders to maintain the profile of hand hygiene action to save patient lives. Being part of the WHO SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands campaign means that people can access important information to help in their practice. This year Pr Pittet and three leading surgeons explain why hand hygiene at the right times in surgical care is life saving.

 

 

Le 5 mai de chaque année, l’OMS exhorte tous les travailleurs et responsables de santé à maintenir haut le profil de la promotion des bonnes pratiques d’hygiène des mains afin de sauver la vie de patients. Faire partie de la campagne Pour Sauver des Vies: l’Hygiène des Mains signifie que soignants et collaborateurs de santé peuvent accéder à des informations importantes pour améliorer leurs pratiques. Cette année, le Pr Pittet et trois chirurgiens de renommée internationale expliquent pourquoi l’hygiène des mains au bon moment au cours des soins chirurgicaux sauve des vies.

 

5 Moments for Hand Hygiene

The My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene approach defines the key moments when health-care workers should perform hand hygiene.

This evidence-based, field-tested, user-centred approach is designed to be easy to learn, logical and applicable in a wide range of settings.

This approach recommends health-care workers to clean their hands

  • before touching a patient,
  • before clean/aseptic procedures,
  • after body fluid exposure/risk,
  • after touching a patient, and
  • after touching patient surroundings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For further Information on WHO My 5 Moments for Hand
Hygiene visit:
To download hand hygiene reminder tools for the workplace visit:
To access WHO hand hygiene improvement tools and resources for use
all year round visit:
To see the latest number of hospitals and health care facilities which
have signed up to support the campaign visit:

 

Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) a Spore Forming Bacteria

Types of spore forming bacteria.

To provide a background and definition of  each of them the following information is beneficial.

Bacteria are a large group of microscopic, unicellular organisms that exist either independently or as parasites. Some bacteria are capable of forming spores around themselves, which allow the organism to survive in hostile environmental conditions. Bacterial spores are made of a tough outer layer of keratin that is resistant to many chemicals, staining and heat. The spore allows the bacterium to remain dormant for years, protecting it from various traumas, including temperature differences, absence of air, water and nutrients. Spore forming bacteria cause a number of diseases, including botulism, anthrax, tetanus and acute food poisoning. (1)

Bacillus

Bacillus is a specific genus of rod-shaped bacteria that are capable of forming spores. They are sporulating, aerobic and ubiquitous in nature. Bacillus is a fairly large group with many members, including Bacillus cereus, Bacillus clausii and Bacillus halodenitrificans. Bacillus spores, also called endospores, are resistant to harsh chemical and physical conditions. This makes the bacteria able to withstand disinfectants, radiation, desiccation and heat. Bacillus are a common cause of food and medical contamination and are often difficult to eliminate.

Clostridium

Clostridium are rod-shaped, Gram-positive (bacteria that retain a violet or dark blue Gram staining due to excessive amounts of peptidoglycan in their cell walls) bacteria that are capable of producing spores. According to the Health Protecton Agency, the Clostridium genus consists of more than a hundred known species, including harmful pathogens such as Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium tetani and Clostridium sordellii.

Some species of the bacteria are used commercially to produce ethanol (Clostridium thermocellum), acetone (Clostridium acetobutylicum), and to convert fatty acids to yeasts and propanediol (Clostridium diolis).

Background:

Scientists discovered C. diff in 1935, but they didn’t recognize it as the major cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea until 1978. The rise of C. diff in the 1970s was triggered by the widespread use of the antibiotic clindamycin. Over the next 20 years, broad-spectrum antibiotics in the penicillin and cephalosporin families fueled the C. diff epidemic, and in the early years of this century, fluoroquinolone antibiotics were linked to a new and more dangerous hypervirulent strain of C. diff.

C. diff is classified as an anaerobic bacterium because it thrives in the absence of oxygen. Like its cousins, the Clostridia that cause tetanus, botulism, and gas gangrene, C. diff passes through a life cycle in which the actively dividing form transforms itself into the spore stage. Spores are inert and metabolically inactive, so they don’t cause disease. At the same time, though, spores are very tough and sturdy; they are hard to kill with disinfectants, and they shrug off even the most powerful antibiotics.

Here’s how C. diff causes trouble. Patients with C. diff shed spores into their feces. Without strict precautions, spores are inadvertently transmitted to hands, utensils, and foods, and then swallowed by someone else. The spores come to life in the second person’s GI tract, but in the best of circumstances, the normal bacteria keep C. diff in check and illness does not develop. But if the “good” GI bacteria have been knocked down by antibiotics, C. diff gets the upper hand. As C. diff multiplies and grows, it produces toxins that injure the lining of the colon, producing diarrhea, inflammation, and sometimes worse. Ordinary strains of C. diff produce two toxins, called toxins A and B, but the new, worrisome hypervirulent strains produce up to 16 times more toxin A and 23 times more toxin B. (2)

C. diff is an old bacterium,…..the CDAD epidemic is new ……..What turned a medical curiosity into a major threat? In a word, antibiotics.

Antibiotics are marvelous medications, and they are obviously here to stay. But doctors must use them wisely. That means prescribing an antibiotic only when it’s truly necessary, choosing the simplest, most narrowly focused drug that will do the job, and stopping treatment as soon as the job is done. Patients can help by resisting the temptation to demand an antibiotic for every potential infection.

When it comes to using antibiotics properly, less can be more.

Sporolactobacillus

Sporolactobacillus is a group of anaerobic, rod-shaped, spore forming bacteria that include Sporolactobacillus dextrus, Sporolactobacillus inulinus, Sporolactobacillus laevis, Sporolactobacillus terrae and Sporolactobacillus vineae. Sporolactobacillus are also known as lactic-acid bacteria for they are capable of producing the acid from fructose, sucrose, raffinose, mannose, inulin and sorbitol. Sporolactobacillus are found in the soil and often in chicken feed. According to “Fundamentals of Food Microbiology,” the spores formed by Sporolactobacillus are less resistant to heat than those formed by the Bacillus genus.

Sporosarcina

Sporosarcina are a group of round-shaped (cocci) aerobic bacteria that include Sporosarcina aquimarina, Sporosarcina globispora, Sporosarcina halophila, Sporosarcina koreensis, Sporosarcina luteola and Sporosarcina ureae. According to “Antibiotic Resistance and Production in Sporosarcina ureae,” Sporosarcina is thought to play a role in the decomposition of urea in the soil.

#########

Revival and Identification of Bacterial Spores in
25- to 40-Million-Year-Old Dominican Amber
Raid J. Cano* and Monica K. Borucki

A bacterial spore was revived, cultured, and identified from the abdominal contents of extinct bees preserved for 25 to 40 million years in buried Dominican amber. Rigorous surface decontamination of the amber and aseptic procedures were used during the recovery of the bacterium. Several lines of evidence indicated that the isolated bacterium was of ancient origin and not an extant contaminant. The characteristic enzymatic, biochemical, and 1 6S ribosomal DNA profiles indicated that the ancient bacterium is most closely related to extant Bacillus sphaericus.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/268/5213/1060.long

 

Sources:

(1)   http://Sciencing.com/types-spore-forming-bacteria-2504.html

(2) http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/clostridium-difficile-an-intestinal-infection-on-the-rise

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Linda Jablonski, MS, BSN, RN-BC – Director Of Nursing

lindajabheadshot

 

 

WELCOME

We are pleased to welcome Linda Jablonski, MS, BSN, RN-BC, to the C Diff Foundation.   Linda presides as the Director of Nursing of the C Diff Foundation’s Global Community Education & Outreach Program

worldaround

Linda Jablonski has been in the Nursing profession for over 22 years. A Graduate from Fairleigh Dickinson University and Masters at Kean College of New Jersey. Linda was a Special Education Instructor and Counselor prior to entering Nursing and her Thesis was on Preventing Violence Through Education or PTE. The major component of her thesis was Community Outreach. Linda worked her way through school as a Certified Nurses Aide and Home Health Aid which developed the experience and passion in the Home Care setting. Today Linda is a Director of Nursing for a Home Health agency and works at providing quality care, continued education to staff, and speaking to community groups to provide education in Infection Prevention (C.diff., MRSA & Superbugs) and Antibiotic Resistance Awareness and Stewardship Programs.

MD Peer Exchange Focus On Clostridium difficile Infections

mdmag

Courtesy of MDMag .com

MD Magazine

 

 

Listen and View Panelists:  Peter L. Salgo, MD; Erik Dubberke, MD; Lawrence J. Brandt, MD; Dale N. Gerding, MD; and Daniel E. Freedberg, MD, MS,

Topic of discussion:  Understanding Why Clostridium difficile Infections (CDI) Occur In the Community

The second video the panelists discuss:

The Pathophysiology of Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI)  and Its Impact On the Gastrointestinal System.

See more at: http://www.mdmag.com/peer-exchange/clostridium-difficile-infections/understanding-why-clostridium-difficile-infections-occur-in-the-community#sthash.r4Z6jNwk.dpuf