Category Archives: Raising C Diff Awareness Education

WHO’s World Hand Hygiene Day In Conjunction With Fight Antibiotic Resistance – It’s In Your Hands

SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands

WHO’s global annual call to action for health workers


SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands 5 May 2017 – Fight antibiotic resistance – it’s in your hands

The WHO’s calls to action are:

  • Health workers: “Clean your hands at the right times and stop the spread of antibiotic resistance.”
  • Hospital Chief Executive Officers and Administrators: “Lead a year-round infection prevention and control programme to protect your patients from resistant infections.”
  • Policy makers: “Stop antibiotic resistance spread by making infection prevention and hand hygiene a national policy priority.”
  • IPC leaders: “Implement WHO’s Core Components for infection prevention, including hand hygiene, to combat antibiotic resistance.”

Every 5 May, WHO urges all health workers and leaders to maintain the profile of hand hygiene action to save patient lives. Being part of the WHO SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands campaign means that people can access important information to help in their practice. This year Pr Pittet and three leading surgeons explain why hand hygiene at the right times in surgical care is life saving.

 

 

Le 5 mai de chaque année, l’OMS exhorte tous les travailleurs et responsables de santé à maintenir haut le profil de la promotion des bonnes pratiques d’hygiène des mains afin de sauver la vie de patients. Faire partie de la campagne Pour Sauver des Vies: l’Hygiène des Mains signifie que soignants et collaborateurs de santé peuvent accéder à des informations importantes pour améliorer leurs pratiques. Cette année, le Pr Pittet et trois chirurgiens de renommée internationale expliquent pourquoi l’hygiène des mains au bon moment au cours des soins chirurgicaux sauve des vies.

 

5 Moments for Hand Hygiene

The My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene approach defines the key moments when health-care workers should perform hand hygiene.

This evidence-based, field-tested, user-centred approach is designed to be easy to learn, logical and applicable in a wide range of settings.

This approach recommends health-care workers to clean their hands

  • before touching a patient,
  • before clean/aseptic procedures,
  • after body fluid exposure/risk,
  • after touching a patient, and
  • after touching patient surroundings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For further Information on WHO My 5 Moments for Hand
Hygiene visit:
To download hand hygiene reminder tools for the workplace visit:
To access WHO hand hygiene improvement tools and resources for use
all year round visit:
To see the latest number of hospitals and health care facilities which
have signed up to support the campaign visit:

 

Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) a Spore Forming Bacteria

Types of spore forming bacteria.

To provide a background and definition of  each of them the following information is beneficial.

Bacteria are a large group of microscopic, unicellular organisms that exist either independently or as parasites. Some bacteria are capable of forming spores around themselves, which allow the organism to survive in hostile environmental conditions. Bacterial spores are made of a tough outer layer of keratin that is resistant to many chemicals, staining and heat. The spore allows the bacterium to remain dormant for years, protecting it from various traumas, including temperature differences, absence of air, water and nutrients. Spore forming bacteria cause a number of diseases, including botulism, anthrax, tetanus and acute food poisoning. (1)

Bacillus

Bacillus is a specific genus of rod-shaped bacteria that are capable of forming spores. They are sporulating, aerobic and ubiquitous in nature. Bacillus is a fairly large group with many members, including Bacillus cereus, Bacillus clausii and Bacillus halodenitrificans. Bacillus spores, also called endospores, are resistant to harsh chemical and physical conditions. This makes the bacteria able to withstand disinfectants, radiation, desiccation and heat. Bacillus are a common cause of food and medical contamination and are often difficult to eliminate.

Clostridium

Clostridium are rod-shaped, Gram-positive (bacteria that retain a violet or dark blue Gram staining due to excessive amounts of peptidoglycan in their cell walls) bacteria that are capable of producing spores. According to the Health Protecton Agency, the Clostridium genus consists of more than a hundred known species, including harmful pathogens such as Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium tetani and Clostridium sordellii.

Some species of the bacteria are used commercially to produce ethanol (Clostridium thermocellum), acetone (Clostridium acetobutylicum), and to convert fatty acids to yeasts and propanediol (Clostridium diolis).

Background:

Scientists discovered C. diff in 1935, but they didn’t recognize it as the major cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea until 1978. The rise of C. diff in the 1970s was triggered by the widespread use of the antibiotic clindamycin. Over the next 20 years, broad-spectrum antibiotics in the penicillin and cephalosporin families fueled the C. diff epidemic, and in the early years of this century, fluoroquinolone antibiotics were linked to a new and more dangerous hypervirulent strain of C. diff.

C. diff is classified as an anaerobic bacterium because it thrives in the absence of oxygen. Like its cousins, the Clostridia that cause tetanus, botulism, and gas gangrene, C. diff passes through a life cycle in which the actively dividing form transforms itself into the spore stage. Spores are inert and metabolically inactive, so they don’t cause disease. At the same time, though, spores are very tough and sturdy; they are hard to kill with disinfectants, and they shrug off even the most powerful antibiotics.

Here’s how C. diff causes trouble. Patients with C. diff shed spores into their feces. Without strict precautions, spores are inadvertently transmitted to hands, utensils, and foods, and then swallowed by someone else. The spores come to life in the second person’s GI tract, but in the best of circumstances, the normal bacteria keep C. diff in check and illness does not develop. But if the “good” GI bacteria have been knocked down by antibiotics, C. diff gets the upper hand. As C. diff multiplies and grows, it produces toxins that injure the lining of the colon, producing diarrhea, inflammation, and sometimes worse. Ordinary strains of C. diff produce two toxins, called toxins A and B, but the new, worrisome hypervirulent strains produce up to 16 times more toxin A and 23 times more toxin B. (2)

C. diff is an old bacterium,…..the CDAD epidemic is new ……..What turned a medical curiosity into a major threat? In a word, antibiotics.

Antibiotics are marvelous medications, and they are obviously here to stay. But doctors must use them wisely. That means prescribing an antibiotic only when it’s truly necessary, choosing the simplest, most narrowly focused drug that will do the job, and stopping treatment as soon as the job is done. Patients can help by resisting the temptation to demand an antibiotic for every potential infection.

When it comes to using antibiotics properly, less can be more.

Sporolactobacillus

Sporolactobacillus is a group of anaerobic, rod-shaped, spore forming bacteria that include Sporolactobacillus dextrus, Sporolactobacillus inulinus, Sporolactobacillus laevis, Sporolactobacillus terrae and Sporolactobacillus vineae. Sporolactobacillus are also known as lactic-acid bacteria for they are capable of producing the acid from fructose, sucrose, raffinose, mannose, inulin and sorbitol. Sporolactobacillus are found in the soil and often in chicken feed. According to “Fundamentals of Food Microbiology,” the spores formed by Sporolactobacillus are less resistant to heat than those formed by the Bacillus genus.

Sporosarcina

Sporosarcina are a group of round-shaped (cocci) aerobic bacteria that include Sporosarcina aquimarina, Sporosarcina globispora, Sporosarcina halophila, Sporosarcina koreensis, Sporosarcina luteola and Sporosarcina ureae. According to “Antibiotic Resistance and Production in Sporosarcina ureae,” Sporosarcina is thought to play a role in the decomposition of urea in the soil.

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Revival and Identification of Bacterial Spores in
25- to 40-Million-Year-Old Dominican Amber
Raid J. Cano* and Monica K. Borucki

A bacterial spore was revived, cultured, and identified from the abdominal contents of extinct bees preserved for 25 to 40 million years in buried Dominican amber. Rigorous surface decontamination of the amber and aseptic procedures were used during the recovery of the bacterium. Several lines of evidence indicated that the isolated bacterium was of ancient origin and not an extant contaminant. The characteristic enzymatic, biochemical, and 1 6S ribosomal DNA profiles indicated that the ancient bacterium is most closely related to extant Bacillus sphaericus.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/268/5213/1060.long

 

Sources:

(1)   http://Sciencing.com/types-spore-forming-bacteria-2504.html

(2) http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/clostridium-difficile-an-intestinal-infection-on-the-rise

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Linda Jablonski, MS, BSN, RN-BC – Director Of Nursing

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WELCOME

We are pleased to welcome Linda Jablonski, MS, BSN, RN-BC, to the C Diff Foundation.   Linda presides as the Director of Nursing of the C Diff Foundation’s Global Community Education & Outreach Program

worldaround

Linda Jablonski has been in the Nursing profession for over 22 years. A Graduate from Fairleigh Dickinson University and Masters at Kean College of New Jersey. Linda was a Special Education Instructor and Counselor prior to entering Nursing and her Thesis was on Preventing Violence Through Education or PTE. The major component of her thesis was Community Outreach. Linda worked her way through school as a Certified Nurses Aide and Home Health Aid which developed the experience and passion in the Home Care setting. Today Linda is a Director of Nursing for a Home Health agency and works at providing quality care, continued education to staff, and speaking to community groups to provide education in Infection Prevention (C.diff., MRSA & Superbugs) and Antibiotic Resistance Awareness and Stewardship Programs.

MD Peer Exchange Focus On Clostridium difficile Infections

mdmag

Courtesy of MDMag .com

MD Magazine

 

 

Listen and View Panelists:  Peter L. Salgo, MD; Erik Dubberke, MD; Lawrence J. Brandt, MD; Dale N. Gerding, MD; and Daniel E. Freedberg, MD, MS,

Topic of discussion:  Understanding Why Clostridium difficile Infections (CDI) Occur In the Community

The second video the panelists discuss:

The Pathophysiology of Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI)  and Its Impact On the Gastrointestinal System.

See more at: http://www.mdmag.com/peer-exchange/clostridium-difficile-infections/understanding-why-clostridium-difficile-infections-occur-in-the-community#sthash.r4Z6jNwk.dpuf

 

 

Highlights Of the Latest Advances In the Battle Against the Deadly Pathogen – Dale Gerding, MD

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TO READ THIS ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY AS PUBLISHED IN THE MD MAGAZINE — PLEASE CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINK TO BE REDIRECTED:

 

http://www.mdmag.com/medical-news/c-diff-foundation-highlights-latest-advances-in-the-battle-against-the-deadly-pathogen

In September, researchers, health care workers, and industry and patient advocates convened for the 4th Annual International Raising C. diff Awareness Conference and Health Expo in Atlanta.

Clifford McDonald, MD, Associate Director for Science in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), chaired the conference. In his role at the CDC, McDonald’s at the forefront of efforts to prevent and treat the infection – one the CDC has declared among the most urgent drug-resistant threats that we currently face.

“It’s my firm belief that we are on the threshold of a new era in better diagnosis, treatment, and prevention approaches. At the CDC, we deal with statistics, but there are faces behind those numbers. At the heart of every infection is a patient who deserves our competence, our empathy, and our passion,” said McDonald.

One of those faces, Roy Poole, is a volunteer patient advocate for the  C Diff Foundation. After retiring from a career in the Air Force, Poole led a healthy, active lifestyle as an avid outdoors-man in Colorado before antibiotics prescribed for a routine dental procedure set the stage for CDI. In the medical community, his symptoms were met with disbelief and inappropriate treatment.

“Three weeks after leaving the hospital, I walked into my (previous) primary care physician, and asked for an order to have a stool sample taken to determine if Toxins A or B were present. His response was, ‘Are you still having problems with that?’ Clearly, there is a need for more education about C. diff among physicians,” said Poole.

CDI is a formidable opponent. However, with the newly focused attention on discovering ways to disable the bacteria and cohesive public health approaches aimed at prevention, presenters from government, academia and industry offered five key reasons we can win the battle against C. diff:

Antibiotic stewardship efforts are gaining a foothold.
Statistics present a chilling picture: 453,000 new cases and an estimated 30,000 deaths each year. It’s likely that those numbers grossly underestimate the true impact of CDI, since it’s what we know from death certificate reporting.

However, we are seeing that rates may have peaked after a long plateau. Mark Wilcox, MD, Head of Microbiology at Leeds Teaching Hospital, Professor of Medical Microbiology at University of Leeds, and the lead on Clostridium difficile for Public Health England in the United Kingdom, has demonstrated a 70% reduction in cases in England in just 7 years. This was after a concerted effort that Wilcox spearheaded surrounding antibiotic stewardship, specifically addressing a reduction in unnecessary prescribing of fluoroquinolones and cephalosporin antibiotics.

Commonly prescribed antibiotics disrupt the protective microbiota (the normal bacteria of the gut) and leave it vulnerable for C. diff colonization. “There was a concerted effort that went beyond lip service and truly embraced the principles of improved surveillance, more accurate diagnostics, enhanced infection prevention measures to use antibiotics more wisely and to limit transmission and careful treatment,” said Wilcox.

High rates of CDI are always associated with the use of certain antibiotics: clindamycin, cephalosporin, and fluoroquinolones. Research has shown that lower respiratory tract infections and urinary tract infections account for more than 50% of all in-patient antibiotics use. But are these really necessary?

“We know that antibiotics are overused and misused across every healthcare setting. At least 30% of antibiotic prescriptions are unnecessary – and this equates to 47 million unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions per year written in doctors’ offices, hospital outpatient departments, and emergency departments. We have a lot of work to do, and CDC is actively working to reduce unnecessary antibiotic use,” said Arjun Srinivasan, MD at the CDC. “Stopping unnecessary antibiotics is the single most effective thing we can do to curb C. diff infections in the United States. This is something that we can do today.”

Srinivasan acknowledged that telling patients that they can’t have a prescription for an antibiotic might result in some pushback. “Patient satisfaction scores are a very real concern. When someone is sick and takes a day off work, they’re not leaving without a prescription – especially when the last provider wrote one for their same symptoms,” he said. “But this is a new day, and it’s up to the physician to educate their patients and stay strong.”

Hospitalists have access to accurate, inexpensive and quick diagnostic tests that can lead to targeted, effective treatment. This can arm the treating physician and patient with information that can put patients on a path to recovery without feeling like they are being dismissed.

Emerging guidance reflects important advances in research and development.

Most recently published in 2010, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Clinical Practice Guidelines for C. diff are currently under review. This is critical because of the number of physicians still treating with metronidazole first, despite the fact that the largest randomized controlled clinical trial has shown that vancomycin is more effective.

“Since 2010, the landscape has changed dramatically,” said Stuart B. Johnson, MD, Professor, Department of Medicine, Loyola University, and Researcher at the Hines VA Hospital in Chicago.

“The past few years have ushered in a new age of understanding how and where C. diff colonizes, and the damaging toxins A and B that it produces.”

Considering that 25-30% of patients experience a CDI recurrence, it’s evident that metronidazole unnecessarily contributes to the failed treatment outcomes for patients. Metronidazole is less expensive, but has more side effects than oral vancomycin and is less effective in treating CDI.

Johnson provided an overview of the dramatic advances this space has seen in just the past few years.

Limitations of current guidelines include:
•       No mention of fidaxomicin, a narrow-spectrum antibiotic, which in 2011 was the first medication approved in 25 years for the treatment of C. diff associated diarrhea
•       Limited evidence for recommendations to treat severe, complicated CDI
•       Limited evidence for recommendations on recurrent CDI
•       Little mention of Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT)

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5.  Patient advocacy and awareness efforts can alter the course of CDI.
CDI survivors shared their experiences along their emotional journey – fear, disbelief, isolation, and depression. They also expressed gratitude at the validation, information and support they received from the patient advocacy community. Perhaps the greatest gift they have received is the empowerment to question their physicians about the necessity of antibiotics they have been prescribed in terms of risk of CDI.

“The hospital where I was treated initially seemed eager to have me leave. They offered no additional help. The C diff Foundation has been my greatest source of help. In turn, I feel I help myself cope best, when I help others to cope with the disease,” said Poole.

TO READ THIS ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY AS PUBLISHED IN THE MD MAGAZINE 

PLEASE CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINK TO BE REDIRECTED —- THANK YOU

http://www.mdmag.com/medical-news/c-diff-foundation-highlights-latest-advances-in-the-battle-against-the-deadly-pathogen

 

Dale Gerding, MD, FACP, FIDSA, is Professor of Medicine at Loyola University Chicago, Research Physician at the Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital. Additionally, Gerding is an infectious disease specialist and hospital epidemiologist, past president of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and past chair of the antibiotic resistance committee of SHEA. He is a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and past chair of the National and Global Public Health Committee and the Antibiotic Resistance Subcommittee of IDSA. His research interests include the epidemiology and prevention of Clostridium difficile, antimicrobial resistance, and antimicrobial distribution and kinetics.

The paper, “Burden of Clostridium difficile Infection in the United States,” was published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The study, “Changing epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection following the intriduction of a national ribotyping-based surveillance scheme in England,” was published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.

The study, “Prevalence of antimicrobial use in US acute care hospitals,” was published in JAMA.

The paper, “Vancomycin, metronidazole, or toleyamer for Clostridium difficile infection: results from two multinaionalm randomized, controlled trials,” was published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

The study, “A Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial of Saccharomyces boulardii in Combination with Standard Antibiotics for Clostridium difficile disease,” was published in JAMA.

November 29th Is Giving Tuesday – A Global Day Of Giving and Your Support Grows and Strengthens the C Diff Foundation

giving-tuesday

#GivingTuesday

Giving Tuesday Is a global day dedicated to giving back.

On Tuesday, November 29th , 2016  Charities, Families, Businesses, Community centers, and Students around the world will come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give.

 

giving tuesday

#GivingTuesday was founded in 2012 by New York’s 92nd Street Y in partnership with the United Nations Foundation. Together, with a team of influential and founding partners together launched a global movement that has engaged over 10,000 organizations worldwide.

Remember the C Diff Foundation in your Giving Tuesday efforts. Your gift is tax deductible and it will support patients touched by the life-threatening C. diffiicle infection,  their families, communities and the many  programs dedicated in Raising C. diff. Awareness™   by providing information and support — from villages to cities — worldwide.

We appreciate you and all that you do for the good of others.

To Donate please visit  the C Diff Foundation Website   www.cdifffoundation.org

and choose the tab at the top of the page —

https://cdifffoundation.org/donate/

 

Thank you for your continued support and we are grateful for your generosity.

Global C. difficile Congress – Eight Sessions In Four Hours Webinar – A Half Day To Change the C. difficile World

worldworld

Raising global awareness with leading international topic experts have proven to be effective over the years with audiences attending our annual conferences.

 

The Global C. difficile Congress took place on November 11th, 2016 and broadened existing knowledge surrounding C. difficile infection (CDI)  prevention, treatments, research, and environmental safety worldwide.

The drive and passion takes us forward in promoting the practical and technical advancements taking place across the globe.  Healthcare Professionals from every area of expertise, discussed the control and  treatment options,  the healthcare perspectives, antibiotic-resistance stewardship programs, and much more to raise C. diff. awareness and share successful implementations and guidelines.

This free webinar is available to you and with the ease of learning without having to travel.

The Global C. difficile Congress  —  eight sessions presented by topic experts  – in four hours – in one day –  with goals to change the C. difficile world with a common focus; To
improve awareness of C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, research, and environmental safety in the healthcare communities worldwide.

 

https://recordings.join.me/ezyFo7graka6cXR8nmjkoQ

 

Guest Speakers and Program Topics

USA    ET                         UK TIME               GUEST SPEAKER

8:00 – 8:15 a.m.            1:00 – 1:15 p.m.       Paul Feuerstadt, MD

Dr. Paul Feuerstadt; Native of Long Island, New York, Dr. Feuerstadt attended the University of Pennsylvania where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Biology, with distinction in research and graduated Summa Cum Laude. Following completion of his undergraduate training, Dr. Feuerstadt attended the Weill Medical College of Cornell University in Manhattan, New York where he earned his Medical Doctor degree and stayed at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell medical center for his internship and residency in Internal Medicine. Following completion of his residency
Dr. Feuerstadt then moved on to the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, NY for his clinical fellowship training.His areas of interest include ischemic diseases of the gut and chronic diarrheal syndromes with a specific focus on C.diff. infections.Dr. Feuerstadt is affiliated with St. Raphael campus of Yale-New Haven Hospital, Yale-New Haven Hospital and
Milford Hospital seeing outpatients in his offices in Hamden and Milford, CT
Topic: Welcome – Introduction

8:15 – 8:45 a.m.            1:15 – 1:45               Jean de Gunzburg, PhD

Dr. de Gunzburg is Chief Scientific Officer of Da Volterra, an emerging biotechnology company, headquartered in Paris, France.  Prior to this, Jean de Gunzburg led an academic research career in molecular and cell biology at the Institut Pasteur (Paris, France), the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research (Cambridge, MA, USA) and the Institut Curie (Paris, France). He is the author of over 70 publications in international peer reviewed scientific journals, and continues to serve on several grant review committees.
Topic: “DAV132, A  Novel Product Destined To Prevent Antibiotic-Induced
Clostridium difficile Infections.”

8:45 – 9:15                   1:45 – 2:15                Arjun Srinivasan, MD

Dr. Arjun Srinivasan is the Associate Director for healthcare-associated infection (HAI) prevention programs in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. Dr. Srinivasan is also a captain in the US Public Health Service. An infectious disease doctor, Dr. Srinivasan oversees several CDC programs aimed at eliminating healthcare-associated infections and improving antibiotic use. For much of his CDC career, Dr. Srinivasan ran the healthcare outbreak investigation unit, helping hospitals and other healthcare facilities track down bacteria and stop them from infecting other patients. Dr. Srinivasan leads the CDC’s work to improve antibiotic prescribing and works with a team of CDC experts researching new strategies.
Topic: Antibiotic Stewardship- Improving Antibiotic Use to Combat C diff.”

9:15 – 9:45                   2:15 – 2:45               Clifford McDonald, MD

Dr. McDonald graduated from Northwestern University Medical School. He completed a medical microbiology fellowship at Duke University and is a former member of CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service. Dr. McDonald is currently the Associate Director for Science in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the CDC. He has first authored or co-authored over 100 peer reviewed publications on subjects related to healthcare and infectious disease epidemiology Dr. McDonald joins fellow world-renowned topic experts to discuss the burden of C. difficile infections with the risk factors pertaining to current and emerging treatment options along with the importance of applying evidence-based clinical approaches to the prevention of  a C. difficile infection (CDI), one of the leading community and healthcare-associated infections.
Topic: “Challenges and Opportunities Posed by Current Diagnostics
for Clostridium difficile Infection”

9:45 – 10:15                 2:45 – 3:15               Barley Chironda,, RPN, CIC

Barley Chironda a Nurse, National Healthcare Sales Director and Infection Control Specialist Clorox Canada, Social Media Manager of IPAC Canada,  and the current President of IPAC- GTA.    Mr. Chironda is certified in Infection prevention and control (CIC™) and has worked extensively in Infection Control.  He is typically found engaged in motivating hospital staff, patients and the public on proper infection prevention practices.   Mr. Chironda’s roles allow great participation in quality improvement interventions related to patient and public safety. Therefore Barley has been an integral to the successful decline in Clostridium difficile infections through implementing innovative technology and quality improvement behavioral change.
Topic:  “The C.diff.. Disinfection Debate: To Use
Or Not To Use Sporicidal Disinfectants Every-Time In Healthcare Facilities.”

10:15 -10:45                 3:15 – 3:45              Dale Gerding, MD

Dr. Dale Gerding,  Professor of Medicine at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine in Maywod, Illinois and Research Physician at the Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital. Prior to his present position Dr. Gerding was Chief of Medicine at VA Chicago, Lakeside Division, and Professor of Medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.  He is an infectious diseases specialist and hospital epidemiologist, past president of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and past chair the antibiotic resistance committee of SHEA.  He is a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and past Chair of the National and Global Public Health Committee and the Antibiotic Resistance Subcommittee of IDSA. He served as a member of the Board of Directors of IDSA from 2005-2008. He is a Master of the American College of Physicians and the 2013 recipient of the William Middleton Award, the highest research award given by the Department of Veterans Affairs. He is a member of the American Society for Microbiology, and is board certified in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases. His research interests include the epidemiology and prevention of  Clostridium difficile disease, antimicrobial resistance, and antimicrobial distribution and kinetics.  He has been a Merit Review funded research investigator in the VA for over 40 years and is the author of over 400 peer-reviewed journal publications, book chapters, and review articles.  He holds patents for the use of non-toxigenic C. difficile for the prevention and treatment of this disease.
Topic: “Non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile for Prevention of CDI”

10:45 – 11:15               3:45 – 4:15               Richard Vickers, PhD

Dr. Richard Vickers is the Chief Scientific Officer, Antimicrobials and Programme Lead for CDI,
Summit Therapeutics.  He joined Summit in 2003 and during his time has worked in a variety of roles involved in the development and management of various antibacterial therapeutic programs.  This includes leading the discovery and development of ridinilazole, the investigational antibiotic for the treatment of C. difficile infection. Prior to joining Summit, Dr Vickers undertook postdoctoral research studies with Professor Stephen Davies at the University of Oxford and held a Stipendiary Lectureship in organic chemistry at St. Catherine’s College in Oxford. Dr Vickers received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Reading and a B.Sc. in chemistry from King’s College London.
Topic: “Ridinilazole; A Selective Therapy for the Treatment
of C. difficile Infections (CDI)”

11:15 – 11:45               4:15 – 4:45               Simon Cutting, PhD

Professor Cutting of Molecular Microbiology at Royal Holloway, University of London is a bacterial geneticist with over 25 years of experience with Bacillus since graduating from Oxford University with a D. Phil in 1986. His D.Phil was on understanding the genetic control of spore formation in Bacillus Clostridium difficile.. His other expertise is in the use of Bacillus spores as probiotics and has a number of contracts and consultancies with European and US companies in the food and feed sectors.
Topic: “Thwarting the Opportunist: An Anti-adhesion
Vaccine That Prevents C.difficult Colonization.”

11:45 – 12:15               4:45 – 5:15               Hudson Garrett, Jr, PhD

Dr. Garrett is currently employed as the Global Chief Clinical Officer for Pentax Medical. He holds a dual Masters in Nursing and Public Health, Post-Masters Certificate as a Family Nurse Practitioner, a Post-Masters Certificate in Infection Prevention and Infection Control and a PhD in Healthcare Administration and Policy. He has completed the Johns Hopkins Fellows Program in Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, and the CDC Fundamentals of Healthcare Epidemiology program, and is board certified in family practice, critical care, vascular access, moderate sedation, infection prevention, legal nurse consulting, and a director of nursing in long term care.  Dr. Garrett is also a Fellow in the Academy of National Associations of Directors of Nursing Administration in Long Term Care.
Topic:  “Improving Patient Safety and Reducing Clostridium difficile
through Collaboration with Clinical Nursing and Environmental Services Professionals”

 

For more information please visit the Global C. difficile Congress

http://www.globalcdifficilecongress.org