Category Archives: Continued education

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Denise Graham, Strategic Advisor

We are pleased to welcome Denise Graham
to the C Diff Foundation.

Denise Graham, Founder and President of DDG Associates, formerly the Executive Vice President to the Association for Professionals in Infection Control (APIC) and Epidemiology, led the nation’s public reporting initiative thereby enabling her to work closely with all agencies falling under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  Her expertise in this arena continues by assisting clients with ongoing changes such as value-based purchasing and guidelines coming from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

With greater than twenty years of experience in the healthcare industry, Denise has formed key working relationships with numerous leading experts.

Denise comes to the C Diff Foundation as Strategic Advisor to assist the organization with greater visibility and continued growth in educating and advocating for C.difficile Infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety and support worldwide.

To contact Denise:, please e-mail her at:    denise@cdifffoundation.org

C Diff Foundation Announces Scholarship Program to Support Health Care Students Worldwide

C Diff Foundation is pleased to announce the Michael and Helen Caralla, Sr. Educational Scholarship program. The scholarship program is to help health care students succeed and reach their educational goals.

Michael and Helen Caralla, Sr.
To apply for a C Diff Foundation
Michael and Helen Caralla, Sr. Educational Scholarship,
the applicant must submit an application
by May 1 of each calendar year.

 

 

 

 

 

The C Diff Foundation selection committee chooses application recipients based on a submitted essay, letters of recommendation, a willingness to complete the Volunteer Service project to promote C. difficile infection awareness requirement, and financial need.

Awards consist of annual scholarships that range in value from $750 to $1,500 USD.   Recipients must reapply each year they attend post-secondary school and will be chosen based on their academic progress and mentoring performance.

To be eligible for a Michael and Helen Caralla, Sr. Educational Scholarship the applicant must be:

  • A student and a high school graduate or have a General Educational Development a.k.a. General Educational Diploma (GED).
  • Enrolled full-time at an accredited post-secondary educational institution during the 2017-2018 academic year (If a foreign student is applying and is chosen, the educational scholarship awarded amount will be converted from USD to the educational institute location foreign currency exchange rate and proof of country residency must be provided).
  • Maintain full-time status throughout the 2017-2018 academic year in order to remain eligible.
  • Willing to complete a minimum of 50 volunteer hours promoting C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety awareness in their local communities per academic year awarded the educational scholarship.

C. difficile infections can be acquired and diagnosed in infants and across the life-span with a higher risk involving our senior citizens and that is why it is imperative to learn about a C. difficile infection, its most common symptoms, the treatments available, and environmental safety products to prevent the spread of this spore-bacteria and to help reduce C. difficile infection recurrences.

“When you apply to become a C Diff Foundation Scholar, you are taking the first step to determine your own future. The C Diff Foundation Scholars are individuals motivated and dedicated to making a difference in the health care community. We are excited to offer a scholarship program to help support health care students to advance their career path through the Michael and Helen Caralla, Sr. educational scholarship, a program in memory of our loving parents,” states Nancy C Caralla, Executive Director.

About the C Diff Foundation:
The C Diff Foundation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit, founded in 2012 by Nancy C Caralla, a nurse diagnosed and treated for Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections.

Through her own CDI journeys and witnessing the passing of her father, diagnosed with sepsis secondary to C. difficile infection involvement, Nancy recognized the need for greater awareness through education, the research being conducted by the government, industry, and academia and better advocacy on behalf of patients, healthcare professionals, and researchers worldwide working to address the public health threat posed by this devastating infection.

For additional Scholar Applicant information, visit the C Diff Foundation website

https://cdifffoundation.org/scholarship-eligibility/

Media Coordinator:
Denise Graham, RN
denise@cdifffoundation.org

Twitter: @cdiffFoundation #CdiffScholar

 

WHO’s World Hand Hygiene Day In Conjunction With Fight Antibiotic Resistance – It’s In Your Hands

SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands

WHO’s global annual call to action for health workers


SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands 5 May 2017 – Fight antibiotic resistance – it’s in your hands

The WHO’s calls to action are:

  • Health workers: “Clean your hands at the right times and stop the spread of antibiotic resistance.”
  • Hospital Chief Executive Officers and Administrators: “Lead a year-round infection prevention and control programme to protect your patients from resistant infections.”
  • Policy makers: “Stop antibiotic resistance spread by making infection prevention and hand hygiene a national policy priority.”
  • IPC leaders: “Implement WHO’s Core Components for infection prevention, including hand hygiene, to combat antibiotic resistance.”

Every 5 May, WHO urges all health workers and leaders to maintain the profile of hand hygiene action to save patient lives. Being part of the WHO SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands campaign means that people can access important information to help in their practice. This year Pr Pittet and three leading surgeons explain why hand hygiene at the right times in surgical care is life saving.

 

 

Le 5 mai de chaque année, l’OMS exhorte tous les travailleurs et responsables de santé à maintenir haut le profil de la promotion des bonnes pratiques d’hygiène des mains afin de sauver la vie de patients. Faire partie de la campagne Pour Sauver des Vies: l’Hygiène des Mains signifie que soignants et collaborateurs de santé peuvent accéder à des informations importantes pour améliorer leurs pratiques. Cette année, le Pr Pittet et trois chirurgiens de renommée internationale expliquent pourquoi l’hygiène des mains au bon moment au cours des soins chirurgicaux sauve des vies.

 

5 Moments for Hand Hygiene

The My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene approach defines the key moments when health-care workers should perform hand hygiene.

This evidence-based, field-tested, user-centred approach is designed to be easy to learn, logical and applicable in a wide range of settings.

This approach recommends health-care workers to clean their hands

  • before touching a patient,
  • before clean/aseptic procedures,
  • after body fluid exposure/risk,
  • after touching a patient, and
  • after touching patient surroundings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For further Information on WHO My 5 Moments for Hand
Hygiene visit:
To download hand hygiene reminder tools for the workplace visit:
To access WHO hand hygiene improvement tools and resources for use
all year round visit:
To see the latest number of hospitals and health care facilities which
have signed up to support the campaign visit:

 

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Linda Jablonski, MS, BSN, RN-BC – Director Of Nursing

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WELCOME

We are pleased to welcome Linda Jablonski, MS, BSN, RN-BC, to the C Diff Foundation.   Linda presides as the Director of Nursing of the C Diff Foundation’s Global Community Education & Outreach Program

worldaround

Linda Jablonski has been in the Nursing profession for over 22 years. A Graduate from Fairleigh Dickinson University and Masters at Kean College of New Jersey. Linda was a Special Education Instructor and Counselor prior to entering Nursing and her Thesis was on Preventing Violence Through Education or PTE. The major component of her thesis was Community Outreach. Linda worked her way through school as a Certified Nurses Aide and Home Health Aid which developed the experience and passion in the Home Care setting. Today Linda is a Director of Nursing for a Home Health agency and works at providing quality care, continued education to staff, and speaking to community groups to provide education in Infection Prevention (C.diff., MRSA & Superbugs) and Antibiotic Resistance Awareness and Stewardship Programs.

Highlights Of the Latest Advances In the Battle Against the Deadly Pathogen – Dale Gerding, MD

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TO READ THIS ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY AS PUBLISHED IN THE MD MAGAZINE — PLEASE CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINK TO BE REDIRECTED:

 

http://www.mdmag.com/medical-news/c-diff-foundation-highlights-latest-advances-in-the-battle-against-the-deadly-pathogen

In September, researchers, health care workers, and industry and patient advocates convened for the 4th Annual International Raising C. diff Awareness Conference and Health Expo in Atlanta.

Clifford McDonald, MD, Associate Director for Science in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), chaired the conference. In his role at the CDC, McDonald’s at the forefront of efforts to prevent and treat the infection – one the CDC has declared among the most urgent drug-resistant threats that we currently face.

“It’s my firm belief that we are on the threshold of a new era in better diagnosis, treatment, and prevention approaches. At the CDC, we deal with statistics, but there are faces behind those numbers. At the heart of every infection is a patient who deserves our competence, our empathy, and our passion,” said McDonald.

One of those faces, Roy Poole, is a volunteer patient advocate for the  C Diff Foundation. After retiring from a career in the Air Force, Poole led a healthy, active lifestyle as an avid outdoors-man in Colorado before antibiotics prescribed for a routine dental procedure set the stage for CDI. In the medical community, his symptoms were met with disbelief and inappropriate treatment.

“Three weeks after leaving the hospital, I walked into my (previous) primary care physician, and asked for an order to have a stool sample taken to determine if Toxins A or B were present. His response was, ‘Are you still having problems with that?’ Clearly, there is a need for more education about C. diff among physicians,” said Poole.

CDI is a formidable opponent. However, with the newly focused attention on discovering ways to disable the bacteria and cohesive public health approaches aimed at prevention, presenters from government, academia and industry offered five key reasons we can win the battle against C. diff:

Antibiotic stewardship efforts are gaining a foothold.
Statistics present a chilling picture: 453,000 new cases and an estimated 30,000 deaths each year. It’s likely that those numbers grossly underestimate the true impact of CDI, since it’s what we know from death certificate reporting.

However, we are seeing that rates may have peaked after a long plateau. Mark Wilcox, MD, Head of Microbiology at Leeds Teaching Hospital, Professor of Medical Microbiology at University of Leeds, and the lead on Clostridium difficile for Public Health England in the United Kingdom, has demonstrated a 70% reduction in cases in England in just 7 years. This was after a concerted effort that Wilcox spearheaded surrounding antibiotic stewardship, specifically addressing a reduction in unnecessary prescribing of fluoroquinolones and cephalosporin antibiotics.

Commonly prescribed antibiotics disrupt the protective microbiota (the normal bacteria of the gut) and leave it vulnerable for C. diff colonization. “There was a concerted effort that went beyond lip service and truly embraced the principles of improved surveillance, more accurate diagnostics, enhanced infection prevention measures to use antibiotics more wisely and to limit transmission and careful treatment,” said Wilcox.

High rates of CDI are always associated with the use of certain antibiotics: clindamycin, cephalosporin, and fluoroquinolones. Research has shown that lower respiratory tract infections and urinary tract infections account for more than 50% of all in-patient antibiotics use. But are these really necessary?

“We know that antibiotics are overused and misused across every healthcare setting. At least 30% of antibiotic prescriptions are unnecessary – and this equates to 47 million unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions per year written in doctors’ offices, hospital outpatient departments, and emergency departments. We have a lot of work to do, and CDC is actively working to reduce unnecessary antibiotic use,” said Arjun Srinivasan, MD at the CDC. “Stopping unnecessary antibiotics is the single most effective thing we can do to curb C. diff infections in the United States. This is something that we can do today.”

Srinivasan acknowledged that telling patients that they can’t have a prescription for an antibiotic might result in some pushback. “Patient satisfaction scores are a very real concern. When someone is sick and takes a day off work, they’re not leaving without a prescription – especially when the last provider wrote one for their same symptoms,” he said. “But this is a new day, and it’s up to the physician to educate their patients and stay strong.”

Hospitalists have access to accurate, inexpensive and quick diagnostic tests that can lead to targeted, effective treatment. This can arm the treating physician and patient with information that can put patients on a path to recovery without feeling like they are being dismissed.

Emerging guidance reflects important advances in research and development.

Most recently published in 2010, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Clinical Practice Guidelines for C. diff are currently under review. This is critical because of the number of physicians still treating with metronidazole first, despite the fact that the largest randomized controlled clinical trial has shown that vancomycin is more effective.

“Since 2010, the landscape has changed dramatically,” said Stuart B. Johnson, MD, Professor, Department of Medicine, Loyola University, and Researcher at the Hines VA Hospital in Chicago.

“The past few years have ushered in a new age of understanding how and where C. diff colonizes, and the damaging toxins A and B that it produces.”

Considering that 25-30% of patients experience a CDI recurrence, it’s evident that metronidazole unnecessarily contributes to the failed treatment outcomes for patients. Metronidazole is less expensive, but has more side effects than oral vancomycin and is less effective in treating CDI.

Johnson provided an overview of the dramatic advances this space has seen in just the past few years.

Limitations of current guidelines include:
•       No mention of fidaxomicin, a narrow-spectrum antibiotic, which in 2011 was the first medication approved in 25 years for the treatment of C. diff associated diarrhea
•       Limited evidence for recommendations to treat severe, complicated CDI
•       Limited evidence for recommendations on recurrent CDI
•       Little mention of Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT)

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5.  Patient advocacy and awareness efforts can alter the course of CDI.
CDI survivors shared their experiences along their emotional journey – fear, disbelief, isolation, and depression. They also expressed gratitude at the validation, information and support they received from the patient advocacy community. Perhaps the greatest gift they have received is the empowerment to question their physicians about the necessity of antibiotics they have been prescribed in terms of risk of CDI.

“The hospital where I was treated initially seemed eager to have me leave. They offered no additional help. The C diff Foundation has been my greatest source of help. In turn, I feel I help myself cope best, when I help others to cope with the disease,” said Poole.

TO READ THIS ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY AS PUBLISHED IN THE MD MAGAZINE 

PLEASE CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINK TO BE REDIRECTED —- THANK YOU

http://www.mdmag.com/medical-news/c-diff-foundation-highlights-latest-advances-in-the-battle-against-the-deadly-pathogen

 

Dale Gerding, MD, FACP, FIDSA, is Professor of Medicine at Loyola University Chicago, Research Physician at the Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital. Additionally, Gerding is an infectious disease specialist and hospital epidemiologist, past president of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and past chair of the antibiotic resistance committee of SHEA. He is a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and past chair of the National and Global Public Health Committee and the Antibiotic Resistance Subcommittee of IDSA. His research interests include the epidemiology and prevention of Clostridium difficile, antimicrobial resistance, and antimicrobial distribution and kinetics.

The paper, “Burden of Clostridium difficile Infection in the United States,” was published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The study, “Changing epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection following the intriduction of a national ribotyping-based surveillance scheme in England,” was published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.

The study, “Prevalence of antimicrobial use in US acute care hospitals,” was published in JAMA.

The paper, “Vancomycin, metronidazole, or toleyamer for Clostridium difficile infection: results from two multinaionalm randomized, controlled trials,” was published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

The study, “A Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial of Saccharomyces boulardii in Combination with Standard Antibiotics for Clostridium difficile disease,” was published in JAMA.

July 19th Join C. diff. Spores and More With Dr. Matthew Henn – Discussing The Role Of the Microbiome In Health and Disease: The Basics

 

Listen To the Live Broadcast

On  July 19th,  2016

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Listen in to the live broadcast at 10a PT,   11a MT,   12p CT,   1p ET     6p UK


C. diff. Spores and More,”™ Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program discusses

This Episode:  

The Role of the Microbiome in Health and Disease: The Basics

With Our Guest

Dr. Matthew Henn,  Senior Vice President, Head of Drug Discovery and Bioinformatics

Matthew Henn is the Senior Vice President and Head of Drug Discovery & Bioinformatics of Seres Therapeutics, Inc. He has more than 16 years of combined research experience in microbial ecology, genomics, and bioinformatics that spans both environmental and infectious disease applications.

Dr. Henn’s research has focused on the development, implementation, and application of genomic technologies in the area of microbial populations and their metabolic functions. Prior to joining Seres, he was the Director of Viral Genomics and Assistant Director of the Genome Sequencing Center for Infectious Diseases at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.

Join us on Tuesday, July 19th as Dr. Henn provides the foundation educational information about the microbiome by answering the fundamental questions of what is it, why is it important, how does it impact patients with C. difficile infections, and what are the possibilities of the microbiome as a therapeutic target for future drugs.  This interview will solely be with Dr. Matthew Henn, Senior Vice President and Head of Drug Discovery & Bioinformatics at Seres Therapeutics, Inc,.

Seres Therapeutics is a leading microbiome therapeutics company dedicated to creating a new class of medicines to treat diseases resulting from imbalances in the microbiome.  These first-in-class drugs, called Ecobiotics®, are ecological compositions of beneficial organisms that are designed to restore a healthy human microbiome. The discovery efforts at Seres Therapeutics currently span metabolic, inflammatory, and infectious diseases.

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C. diff. Spores and More ™“ Global Broadcasting Network spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives,C. diff. survivors, board members, and C Diff Foundation volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the C. diff. community worldwide.

Through their interviews, the C Diff Foundation mission will connect, educate, and empower many worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of
Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

To access the C. diff. Spores and More program page and library, please click on the following link:    www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

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Sepsis – Number One Preventable Cause of Death Worldwide Discussed on C. diff. Spores and More With Guests Dr. Kissoon and Ray Schachter

 

Live Broadcast on Tuesday, April 5th

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Sepsis – Number One Preventable Cause of Death Worldwide

 

On Tuesday, April 5th our guests Dr. Niranjan “Tex” Kissoon and Sepsis Survivor Ray Schachter discussed Sepsis – Number One Preventable Cause of Death Worldwide. 

In this episode Tex Kissoon, MD,a well-known physician from Canada, provided us with the insight into the global phenomenon of Sepsis. Sepsis affects more than 30 million lives per year yet it is almost unknown to the general public and is quite often misdiagnosed by medical professionals worldwide. The reasons of why that is with the “why” Sepsis is so deadly, and what you can do to increase Sepsis awareness– were discussed in  60 minutes. Dr. Kissoon was joined by Ray Schachter, a Sepsis survivor who now dedicates all of his available time raising awareness of Sepsis worldwide. Both guests are members of the Global Sepsis Alliance (GSA), which has established World Sepsis Day on September 13th every year to raise awareness for Sepsis worldwide.

About Our Guests:

Dr. Niranjan “Tex”  Kissoon, MD

TexKissoonMD

Dr. Kissoon is the Past President of the World Federation of Pediatric Critical and Intensive Care Societies, Vice-President, Medical Affairs at BC Children’s Hospital and Professor, Pediatric and Surgery (Emergency Medicine) Department of Pediatrics at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, BC as well as he holds the University of British Columbia BC Children’s Hospital (UBC BCCH) Endowed Chair in Acute and Critical Care for Global Child Health.   Dr. Kissoon is the vice chair of the Global Sepsis Alliance, co-chair of World Sepsis Day and the  International Pediatric Sepsis Initiative.).  He has been involved in both advocacy and in promoting Canada-wide involvement in World Sepsis Day as part of a global initiative. He is also involved in promoting sepsis guidelines such that appropriate treatments are given even in areas where there are limited resources.

Dr. Kissoon was awarded a Distinguished Career Award by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2013 for his contribution to the society and discipline as well as the prestigious Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Master of Critical Care Medicine award in 2015 in recognition of his tireless efforts and achievements as a prominent and distinguished leader of national and international stature.  He was also awarded the BNS Walia PGIMER Golden Jubilee Oration 2015 Award for major contribution to Pediatrics in India from the Postgraduate Institute Medical Education and Research. 

A Direct Quote From Our Guest and Sepsis Survivor;  Ray Schachter:

RayS

“I miraculously survived acute Sepsis in 1996 due to extensive medical intervention and have experienced the immediate and long-term consequences on me and my family.  I am the Chair of the Global Sepsis Alliance (GSA) Task Force whose goal is to have the UN mandate Sepsis as a World Health Day. Working with these very accomplished and committed people from GSA, many of whom are on the GSA Executive or Ambassadors, on this important project is a very special opportunity.”

About The Global Sepsis Alliance (GSA):
Sepsis is one of the most underestimated health risks. It affects more than 30 million people worldwide each year; for 6 to 8 million of them with a fatal outcome. Surviving patients often suffer for years from late complications.
This is all the more disturbing as sepsis incidence could be considerably reduced by some simple preventive measures such as vaccination and improved adherence to hygiene standards, early recognition and optimized treatment. The main danger of sepsis results from a lack of knowledge about it.
The founding members of the Global Sepsis Alliance (GSA) have recognized the need to elevate public, philanthropic and governmental awareness and understanding of sepsis and to accelerate collaboration among researchers, clinicians, associated working groups and those dedicated to supporting them. For this reason, they initiated the Global Sepsis Alliance in 2010. Together with supporting organizations from across the globe, we are united in one common goal:

The GSA  wants to ensure that:

  • The incidence of sepsis decreases globally by implementation of strategies to prevent sepsis.
  • Sepsis survival increases for children (including neonates) and adults in all countries through the promotion and adoption of early recognition systems and standardized emergency treatment
  • Public and professional understanding and awareness of sepsis improve
  • Access to appropriate rehabilitation services improve for all patients worldwide
  • The measurement of the global burden of sepsis and the impact of sepsis control and management interventions improve significantly

The GSA Current priorities:

  • Acknowledgement of a resolution on sepsis including official designation of World Sepsis Day (WSD) as one of the World Health Days by the World Health Assembly.
  • Recognition of sepsis in the Global Burden of Disease Report
  • Increase of public awareness and implementation of quality improvement initiatives

To learn more about the GSA please visit their websites:     http://global-sepsis-alliance.org

AND  World Sepsis Day:   http://www.world-sepsis-day.org

 

Our special thanks to GSA General Manager: Marvin Zick for his assistance in coordinating this important episode with the C. diff. Spores and More team.

 

C. diff. Spores and More,” Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program.

The “C. diff. Spores and More” program is made possible
by official Sponsor:     Clorox Healthcare

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