Category Archives: Continued education

July 19th Join C. diff. Spores and More With Dr. Matthew Henn – Discussing The Role Of the Microbiome In Health and Disease: The Basics

 

Listen To the Live Broadcast

On  July 19th,  2016

cdiffRadioLogoMarch2015CLICK ON THE LOGO TO BE REDIRECTED TO LISTEN TO THE BROADCAST

Listen in to the live broadcast at 10a PT,   11a MT,   12p CT,   1p ET     6p UK


C. diff. Spores and More,”™ Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program discusses

This Episode:  

The Role of the Microbiome in Health and Disease: The Basics

With Our Guest

Dr. Matthew Henn,  Senior Vice President, Head of Drug Discovery and Bioinformatics

Matthew Henn is the Senior Vice President and Head of Drug Discovery & Bioinformatics of Seres Therapeutics, Inc. He has more than 16 years of combined research experience in microbial ecology, genomics, and bioinformatics that spans both environmental and infectious disease applications.

Dr. Henn’s research has focused on the development, implementation, and application of genomic technologies in the area of microbial populations and their metabolic functions. Prior to joining Seres, he was the Director of Viral Genomics and Assistant Director of the Genome Sequencing Center for Infectious Diseases at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.

Join us on Tuesday, July 19th as Dr. Henn provides the foundation educational information about the microbiome by answering the fundamental questions of what is it, why is it important, how does it impact patients with C. difficile infections, and what are the possibilities of the microbiome as a therapeutic target for future drugs.  This interview will solely be with Dr. Matthew Henn, Senior Vice President and Head of Drug Discovery & Bioinformatics at Seres Therapeutics, Inc,.

Seres Therapeutics is a leading microbiome therapeutics company dedicated to creating a new class of medicines to treat diseases resulting from imbalances in the microbiome.  These first-in-class drugs, called Ecobiotics®, are ecological compositions of beneficial organisms that are designed to restore a healthy human microbiome. The discovery efforts at Seres Therapeutics currently span metabolic, inflammatory, and infectious diseases.

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

C. diff. Spores and More ™“ Global Broadcasting Network spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives,C. diff. survivors, board members, and C Diff Foundation volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the C. diff. community worldwide.

Through their interviews, the C Diff Foundation mission will connect, educate, and empower many worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of
Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

To access the C. diff. Spores and More program page and library, please click on the following link:    www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

Programming for C. diff. Spores and More ™  is made possible through our official  Sponsor;  Clorox Healthcare

CloroxHealthcare_72

Sepsis – Number One Preventable Cause of Death Worldwide Discussed on C. diff. Spores and More With Guests Dr. Kissoon and Ray Schachter

 

Live Broadcast on Tuesday, April 5th

cdiffRadioLogoMarch2015

Access this program Podcast on
C. diff. Spores and More  Global Broadcasting Network
by clicking on the logo above *

Sepsis – Number One Preventable Cause of Death Worldwide

 

On Tuesday, April 5th our guests Dr. Niranjan “Tex” Kissoon and Sepsis Survivor Ray Schachter discussed Sepsis – Number One Preventable Cause of Death Worldwide. 

In this episode Tex Kissoon, MD,a well-known physician from Canada, provided us with the insight into the global phenomenon of Sepsis. Sepsis affects more than 30 million lives per year yet it is almost unknown to the general public and is quite often misdiagnosed by medical professionals worldwide. The reasons of why that is with the “why” Sepsis is so deadly, and what you can do to increase Sepsis awareness– were discussed in  60 minutes. Dr. Kissoon was joined by Ray Schachter, a Sepsis survivor who now dedicates all of his available time raising awareness of Sepsis worldwide. Both guests are members of the Global Sepsis Alliance (GSA), which has established World Sepsis Day on September 13th every year to raise awareness for Sepsis worldwide.

About Our Guests:

Dr. Niranjan “Tex”  Kissoon, MD

TexKissoonMD

Dr. Kissoon is the Past President of the World Federation of Pediatric Critical and Intensive Care Societies, Vice-President, Medical Affairs at BC Children’s Hospital and Professor, Pediatric and Surgery (Emergency Medicine) Department of Pediatrics at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, BC as well as he holds the University of British Columbia BC Children’s Hospital (UBC BCCH) Endowed Chair in Acute and Critical Care for Global Child Health.   Dr. Kissoon is the vice chair of the Global Sepsis Alliance, co-chair of World Sepsis Day and the  International Pediatric Sepsis Initiative.).  He has been involved in both advocacy and in promoting Canada-wide involvement in World Sepsis Day as part of a global initiative. He is also involved in promoting sepsis guidelines such that appropriate treatments are given even in areas where there are limited resources.

Dr. Kissoon was awarded a Distinguished Career Award by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2013 for his contribution to the society and discipline as well as the prestigious Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Master of Critical Care Medicine award in 2015 in recognition of his tireless efforts and achievements as a prominent and distinguished leader of national and international stature.  He was also awarded the BNS Walia PGIMER Golden Jubilee Oration 2015 Award for major contribution to Pediatrics in India from the Postgraduate Institute Medical Education and Research. 

A Direct Quote From Our Guest and Sepsis Survivor;  Ray Schachter:

RayS

“I miraculously survived acute Sepsis in 1996 due to extensive medical intervention and have experienced the immediate and long-term consequences on me and my family.  I am the Chair of the Global Sepsis Alliance (GSA) Task Force whose goal is to have the UN mandate Sepsis as a World Health Day. Working with these very accomplished and committed people from GSA, many of whom are on the GSA Executive or Ambassadors, on this important project is a very special opportunity.”

About The Global Sepsis Alliance (GSA):
Sepsis is one of the most underestimated health risks. It affects more than 30 million people worldwide each year; for 6 to 8 million of them with a fatal outcome. Surviving patients often suffer for years from late complications.
This is all the more disturbing as sepsis incidence could be considerably reduced by some simple preventive measures such as vaccination and improved adherence to hygiene standards, early recognition and optimized treatment. The main danger of sepsis results from a lack of knowledge about it.
The founding members of the Global Sepsis Alliance (GSA) have recognized the need to elevate public, philanthropic and governmental awareness and understanding of sepsis and to accelerate collaboration among researchers, clinicians, associated working groups and those dedicated to supporting them. For this reason, they initiated the Global Sepsis Alliance in 2010. Together with supporting organizations from across the globe, we are united in one common goal:

The GSA  wants to ensure that:

  • The incidence of sepsis decreases globally by implementation of strategies to prevent sepsis.
  • Sepsis survival increases for children (including neonates) and adults in all countries through the promotion and adoption of early recognition systems and standardized emergency treatment
  • Public and professional understanding and awareness of sepsis improve
  • Access to appropriate rehabilitation services improve for all patients worldwide
  • The measurement of the global burden of sepsis and the impact of sepsis control and management interventions improve significantly

The GSA Current priorities:

  • Acknowledgement of a resolution on sepsis including official designation of World Sepsis Day (WSD) as one of the World Health Days by the World Health Assembly.
  • Recognition of sepsis in the Global Burden of Disease Report
  • Increase of public awareness and implementation of quality improvement initiatives

To learn more about the GSA please visit their websites:     http://global-sepsis-alliance.org

AND  World Sepsis Day:   http://www.world-sepsis-day.org

 

Our special thanks to GSA General Manager: Marvin Zick for his assistance in coordinating this important episode with the C. diff. Spores and More team.

 

C. diff. Spores and More,” Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program.

The “C. diff. Spores and More” program is made possible
by official Sponsor:     Clorox Healthcare

CloroxHealthcare_72

 

 

 

Click on the above logo to learn more about Clorox Healthcare Products

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Dr. Caterina Oneto, MD

oneto_for_the_web

 

We are pleased to welcome Dr. Caterina Oneto, MD to the
C Diff Foundation. 

Dr. Oneto presides as a Medical Advocate for the  
C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program teleconferencing sessions.

 

Cdiff2015CDNCSPostCard

 

Dr. Caterina Oneto is a Clinical Assistant Professor within the NYU Division of Gastroenterology, Board Certified in Gastroenterology and Internal Medicine. 

Fluent in Spanish, she graduated with a degree in Medicine and Surgery from the
Universidad de Valparaiso in Chile. She completed her residency in
Internal Medicine at Cabrini Medical Center, where she served also as Chief Resident, and later completed her Fellowship in Gastroenterology at Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. 

With expertise in endoscopy, colonoscopy, capsule endoscopy, liver and pancreatic diseases, Dr. Oneto’s special interests include IBD (Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative Colitis), IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), microbiota modification, treatment of Clostridium Difficile and FMT (Fecal Microbiota Transplantation). 

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Dr. Paul Feuerstadt, MD, FACG

drPaulfeuerstadt

 

We are pleased to welcome Dr. Paul Feuerstadt, MD to the
C Diff Foundation.  Dr. Feuerstadt presides as Medical Advocate
for the C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program.

 

A native of Long Island, New York, Dr. Feuerstadt attended the University of Pennsylvania where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Biology, with distinction in research and graduated Summa Cum Laude. Following completion of his undergraduate training, Dr. Feuerstadt attended the Weill Medical College of Cornell University in Manhattan, New York where he earned his Medical Doctor degree and stayed at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell medical center for his internship and residency in Internal Medicine. Following completion of his residency Dr. Feuerstadt then moved on to the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, New York for his clinical fellowship training.

Throughout Dr. Feuerstadt’s training and practice he has been actively involved in research and other academic pursuits. His areas of interest include ischemic diseases of the gut and chronic diarrheal syndromes with a specific focus on Clostridium difficile infection. He has presented his research extensively at national meetings and has authored and co-authored many manuscripts and textbook chapters. Another passion of Dr. Feuerstadt’s is teaching, frequently mentoring the fellows in the Division of Digestive Disease at Yale-New Haven Hospital where he holds a clinical appointment as a Clinical Instructor of Medicine. His clinical practice is his ultimate passion filling the majority of his work time seeing a broad spectrum of patients with gastrointestinal and hepatic disease. Dr. Feuerstadt is affiliated with the
St. Raphael campus of Yale-New Haven Hospital, Yale-New Haven Hospital, and Milford Hospital seeing outpatients in his offices in Hamden and Milford, Connecticut.

Let’s Kick Off Raising C. diff. Awareness Worldwide

CDIFFSIGN1

“Raising C. diff.  Awareness ”

 

Let’s begin promoting C. difficile prevention and begin witnessing a shared goal in a decrease in newly diagnosed C.difficile infections worldwide.

 

HAND-WASHING remains the number one prevention.  Follow the hand washing procedures to ensure proper and effective technique:

  • Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
  • Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  • Scrub your hands for at least 30 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song  from beginning to end twice.
  • Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
  • Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

When is it a good time for a hand-washing (hand hygiene) break?

Before, during, and after preparing food, Before eating food,Before and after patient care, Before and after treating a cut or wound, Before  exiting a restroom,  After a diaper change, After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing, After petting a pet or any livestock animals, After touching garbage, AND OFTEN.

The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention recommends infection prevention  protocols be shared between healthcare professionals and long-term facility administrators for the safety of the patient, visitors, and other patient’s safety.CDCantibioticresist2015infographic-a920px

 

 

 

 

 

 

Question the necessity of antibiotics to treat symptoms.  Unnecessary use of antibiotics raises the risk of acquiring a C. difficile infection.  Remember antibiotics do not effect viruses.  Healthcare professionals; confirming a bacterial infection before prescribing antibiotic course of treatment is advised.

Testing:  When a patient presents symptoms (diarrhea with abdominal cramping/pain, fatigue, fever) ordering a C. difficile stool test to rule out a C. diff. infection is beneficial, especially if the patient has been treated with antibiotics within ninety-days.

Environmental Safety:  Disinfecting a patient’s room, treated for a positive C. difficile infection, with a bleach or Federal EPA registered spore-killing product will help eliminate   C. difficile spores from being spread to another patient’s room.  Environmental safety is also an important matter in home-care.  Cleaning all high-touch areas in both long-term and acute care facilities, and home environments will help decrease the spread of this infection.  (High-touch surfaces: light switches, door knobs/handles, bed-side commodes, bathroom hand rails, commode, sink and sink handles, counter-tops, floors, bath-tubs, showers, canes, wheel-chairs, and all medical equipment in a patient’s room).

Person Protection: Visitors and Environmental professionals, wear proper personal protection equipment when treating and cleaning areas/rooms of a C. difficile patient.  (gloves, gowns, shoe coverings, protective eye wear if using using spray solutions).

Patient Isolation:  Protect the patient and others by keeping a C. difficile patient in isolation in long-term and acute care facilities.  This will prevent the spread of infection to others and other areas within the facilities.

Communication:  If a patient is being transferred from either a long-term or acute care facility, communicate to the facility intake personnel the patient’s C. diff. infection and necessary infection control protocols to be implemented for the patient and other patient’s safety.

The CDC has been sharing public announcements regarding the use of Antibiotics for both healthcare professionals and patients alike.  Colds, Ear and Sinus symptoms may be caused by a virus, not bacteria.  Taking antibiotics to treat a virus makes antibiotic medications less effective when they are needed while raising the risk of acquiring a C. difficile infection.  Limit the use of Antibiotics to reduce the risk of acquiring a C. difficile infection  (Bacterial infections and the treatment of symptoms will be determined and should be followed by the treating healthcare professionals). * 2015 Get Smart Week is November 16-22.

getsmartlogo

join the CDC’s Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work campaign.

None of us can do this alone…..all of us can do this TOGETHER!

 

For additional C. difficile information, review the archives and categories available on the website :   http://www.cdifffoundation.org

C. difficile, a leading Healthcare-Associated Infection, Brings Together World Topic Experts At the International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health EXPO in Boston, MA on November 9th

 2015 International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference & Health EXPO

Boston, MA, USA   ~    November 9th

7:30 a.m – 5:00 p.m

conferencesanjuanprJoin us at our 3rd annual International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health EXPO on November 9th.  Not just another educational conference but one that pairs
world-renowned topic experts with presentations on state-of-the-art health care topics pertaining to a leading Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI); C. difficile

*Prevention
*Treatments
*Research
*Prevention and Treatment Clinical trials and studies
*Microbiome research
*Infection Prevention
*Environmental Safety
*Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants
……………………..and much more.

The panel of world-renowned topic experts will also discuss the burden of C. diff. the risk factors pertaining to current and emerging treatment options along with the importance of applying evidence-based clinical approaches to the prevention of  a C. diff. infection (CDI), one of the leading Hospital-Acquired Infections.

Clostridium difficile (also known as C. diff.) is an important cause of infectious disease death in the United States.  Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released February 25, 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). • More than 100,000 of these infections developed among residents of U.S. nursing homes alone.*  Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of a C. diff. infection.   Of these 29,000 – 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly related to a  C. diff. infection. Therefore; C. diff. is an important cause of infectious disease death in the U.S.  (Source: CDC)

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

Conference Venue:

Double Tree Suites Hotel – Boston – Cambridge
400 Soldiers Field Road, Boston, MA  02134  USA
1-617-783-0090 For Hotel Accommodations *   * There are hotel accommodations available for Sunday evening offered at a special event rate for guests of the C Diff Foundation.  Please inform the DoubleTree representative at the time of creating a reservation to receive the special event room rate.

Exclusive Admission:   $75.00

Student Admission:     $50.00

Each exclusive and student ticket includes admission to all presentations, formal and informal Q&A sessions, introductions to fellow healthcare professionals, continental breakfast  (7:30 a.m.) , a plated four course luncheon with the choice of Chicken Florentine or Petite Filet Mignon main entree, Access to the Health EXPO, a conference book, a educational DVD, and formal conference program.  

To Register and obtain tickets, please click on the following link

NOTE:  *Presentations should not be recorded audio or video or published without prior written and signed permission from the guest speaker and addressed by each attendee seeking publication of said presentations.

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

Guest Speakers

Key Speaker and Conference Chair:  Professor Mark Wilcox;  Professor of Medical Microbiology, Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, UK. Professor Mark Wilcox is a Consultant Microbiologist, Head of Microbiology and Academic Lead of Pathology at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Leeds, and is the Lead on Clostridium difficile for the Public Health England. He has formerly been the Director of Infection Prevention, Infection Control Doctor and Clinical Director of Pathology at Leeds Teaching Hospitals.

Dr. John Bartlett, MD; Assistant Professor Medicine, UCLA/Sepulveda Veterans Admin Hospital 1972-5, Associate Professor and Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, 1975-80, Professor of Medicine and Chair Division of Infectious Diseases Division, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine 1980 – 2006; Professor of Medicine, 2006 – 13; Professor of Medicine emeritus, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2013.Dominant research interests: anaerobic infections and pulmonary infections 1968 – 74; community acquired pneumonia and diagnostic methods, 1974-1980; Bowel prep for elective colon surgery; Protected bronchoscopy brush catheter-1977; Clostridium difficile 1977 – 84, HIV 1983 – 2014; bioterrorism 1999 –2004; Clostridium difficile infection, HIV/AIDS and antibiotic resistance 2006-2013 with  Major current interests: Clostridium difficile infection, HIV infection, antibiotic resistance, careers in infectious diseases.
Presentation Topic: “The discovery of Clostridium difficile as the cause of antibiotic-associated colitis.”

Professor Simon M. Cutting, Professor of Molecular Microbiology at Royal Holloway, University of London is a bacterial geneticist with over 25 years of experience with Bacillus since graduating from Oxford University with a D. Phil in 1986. His D.Phil was on understanding the genetic control of spore formation in Bacillus. After spending 7 years in the renowned laboratory of Professor Richard Losick at Harvard University Biological Laboratories (USA) he spent 3 years as an Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in Philadelphia. He returned to the UK in 1996 and since then has worked on developing bacterial spores as novel oral vaccines at
Royal Holloway, University of London. The Cutting lab has developed a number of prototype oral vaccines and is now entering a ‘first in man’ phase 1/IIa clinical trial of a prototype oral vaccine to 
Clostridium difficile (see www.cdvax.org). His other expertise is in the use of Bacillus spores as probiotics and has a number of contracts and consultancies with European and US companies in the food and feed sectors 
(see SporeGen.com).
Presentation Topic: “Mucosal Vaccination: Decolonisation is Essential to Full Protection Against C. difficile

Dr. Sadeq A. Quraishi, MD, MHA, MMSc   Anesthesiologist/Intensive Care physician in the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA. He is also Assistant Professor of Anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA. Dr. Quraishi’s overall research goal is to better define how macro- and micro-nutrient status influence outcomes during acute stress and critical illness. In particular, his research group has focused on the immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D in the perioperative setting, during acute care hospitalization, and for patients in the intensive care unit. Recently, Dr. Quraishi’s group has identified vitamin D status as a potentially modifiable risk factor for hospital acquired C. diff infections and that the severity of C. Diff infections may also be related to vitamin D status .
Presentation Topic:  “Vitamin D as nutritional immunomodulation
for Clostridium difficile infections.”

Dr. Mary Beth Dorr , Phd, studied Pharmacy at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia and received a PhD in pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism from the University of North Carolina. For the last 28 years Dr. Dorr has worked in the pharmaceutical industry in various capacities, with the majority of the time devoted to the design and implementation of Phase 1 to 4 clinical trials, primarily for anti-infective products.  Prior to joining Merck, Dr. Dorr directed several large, international clinical studies of the efficacy and safety of two IV antibiotics, Synercid and dalbavancin.  She also directed clinical research programs for gastrointestinal and women’s health products.  Mary Beth joined Merck in February 2011 and is currently a Clinical Director in the Late Stage Clinical Development Department as the Clinical Monitor directing 2 large pivotal Phase 3 trials investigating the safety and efficacy of the monoclonal antibodies actoxumab and bezlotoxumab as adjunctive therapy for the prevention of C. difficile recurrence.
Presentation Topic: Bezlotoxumab for Prevention of Recurrent C. difficile Infection in Patients on Standard of Care Antibiotics:  Results of Phase 3 Trials (MODIFY I and MODIFY II)

Dr. Hudson Garrett, Jr., PhD, MSN, MPH, FNP, CSRN, VA-BC, CDONA,FACONA,DON-CLTC
Dr. Hudson Garrett is currently employed as the VP, Clinical Affairs for PDI and NIce-Pak, and is responsible for the global Clinical Affairs program and also the Medical Science Liaison program for all divisions within the company. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology/Chemistry and Nursing, a dual Masters in Nursing and Public Health, Post-Masters Certificate as a Family Nurse Practitioner, a Post-Masters Certificate in Infection Prevention and Infection Control and a PhD in Healthcare Administration and Policy. He has completed the Johns Hopkins Fellows Program in Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, and the CDC Fundamentals of Healthcare Epidemiology program, and is board certified in family practice, critical care, vascular assess, moderate sedation, legal nurse consulting, and a director of nursing in long term care.  Dr. Garrett is also a Fellow in the Academy of National Associations of Directors of Nursing Administration in Long Term Care.
Presentation Topic:  Preventing Clostridium difficile thru Antibiotic Stewardship

Dr. David Cook, PhD;  A scientist and entrepreneur who has held senior operating and management positions in the biotechnology industry over his 20-year career. Before joining Seres Therapeutics, he was the chief operating officer for the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, a global R&D organization whose mission is to develop a safe, globally accessible vaccine for HIV. Prior to IAVI, David was the founding CEO at Anza Therapeutics, a biotechnology start-up developing a novel microbial vaccine platform to induce cellular immune responses to fight or prevent diseases such as cancer, hepatitis C, malaria and tuberculosis. He is also a co-inventor on over twenty-five patents. He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard College and his PhD in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr Cook is presently Executive Vice President of R&D, Chief Scientific Officer with Seres Therapeutics, Inc.. Presentation Topic: “The role of the microbiome in resisting
C. difficile infection and the mechanism of Ecobiotic drugs.”

Julie Gubb, PhD, CIC,   has worked in the field of Infection Prevention in varying roles at healthcare facilities in multiple states for more than two decades. After graduating from the University of Detroit Mercy with a degree in Medical Technology, she began her career as Senior Clinical Microbiologist at an acute care hospital in Detroit, Michigan, where she developed an interest in Infection Control while managing the activities of a full-service microbiology laboratory. She was the Director of Infection Control at Mount Clemens Regional Medical Center in Michigan, and has also held positions in Infection Prevention at healthcare facilities in California and Nevada. As a Senior Infection Preventionist for Xenex, Julie works closely with hospitals throughout the United States to understand their infection prevention goals and develop strategies for attaining those goals. As an active member of the national organization Association for Professionals in Infection Control & Epidemiology (APIC), she has maintained Board Certification in Infection Control and Epidemiology since 1993 and speaks frequently at APIC chapter meetings.
Presentation Topic: Stand Up for Cleanliness / Enhanced Room Disinfection

Dr. Patricia J. Freda Pietrobon, PhD: Associate Vice President, R&D,
Sanofi Pasteur, has over 25 years of experience in the Vaccine & Diagnostic industries and more then 20 years in leadership roles focusing on research & development of new vaccines. Patricia began her career in diagnostic assay development with a focus on validation and quality alignment to regulatory requirements and GXPs. Patricia has been with Sanofi Pasteur for over 25 years and has contributed to the development and licensure of new bacterial & viral vaccines for pediatric & adult populations worldwide.

Barley Chironda, Manager of Infection Prevention and Control (IPAC) and Medical Device Reprocessing Device at St. Joseph Health Centre in Toronto, Canada. He is certified in Infection prevention and control (CIC TM) and has worked extensively as an Infection Preventionist. Barely has been an integral to the successful decline in Clostridium difficile infections through implementing innovative technology and quality improvement behavioral changes.   Barley’s presentation will show a behind the scenes account of the C. diff. management from the healthcare facilities perspective while providing a call to action.

Dr. Martha Clokie, PhD, Leicester UK, Professor in Microbiology.  Dr. Cloakie’s research focuses on phages that infect bacterial pathogens of medical relevance and  has published 41 papers in this area. Her major focus has been on Clostridium difficile where she has  isolated a large phage collection. In vitro and in vivo data has shown that the viruses have therapeutic potential. A patent has been filed  on these phages and  working with AmpliPhi to develop a product. Dr. Cloakie  has regular contact with the BBC and other media to talk about her work, and other phage projects, and has consulted with Science museum, London and Eden Project, UK to advise on bacteriophage displays.

Lee Jones, Founder, President and CEO of Rebiotix Inc, has over thirty years of experience in the medical technology industry in large and small companies and academia. Most recently Lee was Chief Administrative Officer of the Schulze Diabetes Institute at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN and is the former president and chief executive officer of Inlet Medical. Inlet Medical was sold to Cooper Surgical in 2006. Lee will introduce Rebiotix Inc.,  a biotechnology company founded in 2011 in Roseville, MN to revolutionize the treatment of challenging gastrointestinal diseases by harnessing the power of the human microbiome The company is developing an entirely new kind of biological drug designed to reverse pathogenic processes responsible for disease through the transplantation of live human-derived microbes into a sick person’s intestinal tract.
Presentation Topic:  Blazing a Trail with the Gut Microbiome

Professor Nancy Sheridan,   a C. diff. Survivor and  Associate Professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology and a winner of the prestigious SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. Professor Sheridan will share her personal experience being treated for a painful and extended journey with a C. diff. infection (CDI).  Professor Sheridan has been teaching since fall 2000 in the Fashion Merchandising Management Department within the School of Business and Technology. For the past seven years, she has also taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Wharton Business School to undergraduate and MBA students.

Dr Mel Thomson, PhD,  completed her Honors degree in microbiology and immunology at the University of Melbourne . She then immigrated to the UK where she worked on various projects as diverse as allergy and cancer before undertaking further studies. She completed a Masters of Research in functional genomics before reading for a PhD in microbial genetic regulation in Neisseria species, both at University of York, UK. After the award of her PhD, Dr Thomson became interested the host-pathogen interactions at the Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, UK.  Dr Thomson returned to Australia in 2011 to start her own research group studying host-pathogen interactions in the GI tract, at Deakin Medical School. A passionate science communicator, and has recently become a national ‘torch bearer’ for the concept of crowd funding academic research, which a track record of three successful ‘Pozible’ crowd funding campaigns, ‘Mighty Maggots’, ‘Hips 4 Hipsters’ and ‘No more Poo Taboo’
Presentation Topic: All that glitters is C.diff awareness gold and Crowdfunding: The ‘No more poo taboo’ animation”

Dr Rahma Wehelie – LifeClean International AB – Sweden; LifeClean International AB is a Swedish company with an international orientation that conducts research, development, and production in the spore, bacteria, and virus eliminating industry. LifeClean was established in 2013 after many years of research and the headquarter lies in Uddevalla, Sweden.
Presentation Topic: Dr Wehelie will be discussing LifeClean’s research, development and production eliminating Clostridium difficile, Norovirus, and other multidrug-resistant bacteria

Dr. Klaus Gottlieb, MD, FACG,Synthetic Biologics, Inc.,Vice President, Clinical;Regulatory Affairs   Dr. Gottlieb is an experienced board-certified internist and gastroenterologist with a strong clinical science, business and drug development background. He joined Synthetic Biologics after serving as Senior Medical Director-Therapeutic Strategy Lead Gastroenterology of Quintiles, a Fortune 500 company and the world’s largest provider of biopharmaceutical development and commercial outsourcing services. At Quintiles, Dr. Gottlieb served as Global Medical Advisor for three separate large Phase 3 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) trials and provided significant input on the shaping, design and evaluation of numerous IBD and other gastrointestinal (GI) clinical trials throughout all stages of development programs. Prior to joining Quintiles in 2013, he was with the FDA in Silver Spring, MD as a Senior Clinical Reviewer for the Division of Gastroenterology and Inborn Errors Products. Widely published, his academic contributions have been recognized by an appointment as Professor of Medicine (Clinical) at George Washington University and the following elected fellowships: Fellow American College of Physicians, Fellow American College of Gastroenterology, Fellow American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.  Presentation Topic: Protecting the Gut Microbiome

For additional information contact the C Diff Foundation: (919) 201-1512 or
info@cdifffoundation.org

To Register and obtain tickets, please click on the following link

We would like to sincerely thank the following Exclusive and Supporting Corporate Sponsors for their continued support  and joining the Foundation in
Raising C. diff. Awareness worldwide.

  • Enjoy visiting our Exclusive Corporate Sponsors websites by simply clicking on their logos belowsyntheticbiologics
  • AmericanGreenTechnologyhrmsrebiotixlogo

LIFECLEANLOGO 001Xenex_LogoLockups_PantoneC

uBiome-Logo (2)SporeGen Logo 2

SANOFI_Pasteur_RVBThis conference is supported through an educational grant from Sanofi Pasteur US

 

MERCKBW2015_medLogoBLK [Converted] (2)This activity has been supported by an independent patient
advocacy grant from Merck & Co., Inc.

“It Takes A Village” Re: Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) and Healthcare-Associated Infections, By Dr. Rosie D. Lyles, MD,MHA,MSc

“It Takes a Village”
By: Rosie D. Lyles, MD, MHA, MSc, Head of Clinical Affairs for Clorox Healthcare
September 21, 2015

With increasing rates of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), C. difficile now rivals methicillin-resistance Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as the most common organism to cause healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in the United States. (1) The prevalence of C. difficile infections has more than doubled in U.S. hospitals from 2000 to 2009 (2) and CDI is regarded as one of the serious, expensive, and potentially avoidable consequences of hospitalization. The cost of treating CDI in the hospital is $3427-$9960 (in 2012), and the cost of treating patients with recurrent CDI is $11,631, for a total cost of more than $1.2 billion annually in the United States. (3-4)

In June 2015, the White House spearheaded an executive call to action focused on implementing and improving antibiotic stewardship programs (ASPs) across the continuum of care (acute care facilities, outpatient clinics, doctors’ offices and long-term care facilities). The urgency around this issue stems from the increasing number of antibiotics prescribed, which subsequently breeds multi-drug resistant organisms (MDROs) like C. difficile. Unnecessary or excessive antibiotic use combined with poor infection control practices may increase the spread of C. difficile within a facility and across facilities when infected patients transfer, such as from a hospital to a nursing home. Increasing evidence suggests that contaminated surfaces in healthcare facilities play an important role in the transmission of several key pathogens including C. difficile, vancomycin – resistant enterococci (VRE), MRSA, Acinetobacter baumannii, and norovirus.

In order to reduce HAIs, all hands on deck are required to support a successful infection prevention strategy. In other words, “it takes a village.” Growing up, I remember hearing the phrase, “it takes a village to raise a child,” meaning there is a partnership within a community with several individuals playing a role in the maturation of a youth. Within a hospital, it’s a collaborative team across several departments that implements evidence-based protocols, continues to educate staff and patients, and maintains compliance of infection control strategies/approaches to reduce the risk of a broad range of infections, including CDI. From the C-suite (administrators and senior management) to direct healthcare providers (such as physicians, nurses, aides, and therapists) and environmental staff (EVS); everyone with direct or indirect contact with a patient’s care plays an essential role.

As a healthcare professional, it’s very important for hospitals to focus on the bigger picture when it comes to infection prevention strategy and control. Prioritizing infection control measures for just one or two pathogens of concern is insufficient. At the end of the day, one pathogen doesn’t trump another because patients don’t want an HAI from ANY pathogen! The horizontal approaches aim to reduce the risk of infections due to a broad array of pathogens through implementation of standardized practices that do not depend on patient-specific conditions:

• Proper hand hygiene
Hand hygiene practices in compliance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines are a key component in preventing and controlling C. difficile, in addition to many other HAI-causing pathogens.
• Universal use of gloves or gloves and gowns
Donning the correct protective equipment minimizes contact with pathogens. It is also important to follow protocols for properly discarding this equipment.
• Universal decolonization (daily optimal bathing with chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG))
CHG bathing has been shown to decrease the bioburden of microorganisms on the patient, the environment, and the hands of healthcare personnel.
• Antimicrobial stewardship program
Ensuring every patient receives an antibiotic only when needed: the right agent, at the right dose, for the right duration.
• Evidence-based environmental cleaning and disinfection products
At a minimum, effective environmental cleaning involves using cleaners & disinfectants that are registered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Supplementing manual cleaning with new technology like ultraviolet (UV) light provides an extra layer of protection and the most comprehensive approach. UV has the highest-energy form that can inactivate dangerous and persistent pathogens by eradicating microorganism deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that may be left on surfaces, which can be missed with traditional cleaning. Finally, because C. difficile has been found in non-CDI patient rooms, using an EPA-registered sporicidal surface disinfectant to clean all patient rooms (daily and terminal) is great strategy to prevent the spread of the bacteria.

I had the pleasure of attending the CDC’s Environmental Hygiene for Ebola and Other Emerging Pathogens meeting on September 14, 2015, with attendees from academia, private industry, federal employees and health organizations, participated in a roundtable discussion on the research framework needed to determine the public health significance of non-critical environmental surface contamination and provide guidance to healthcare facilities about the methods to reduce the contamination of non-critical environmental surfaces reliably in order to improve patient safety. Every participant present at the meeting agreed that, due to the challenges/barriers that hospitals face with preventing HAIs (both from emerging pathogens and more common pathogens like C. difficile), it takes a village to successfully implement evidence-based protocols, continue to educate and maintain compliance with infection prevention protocols.

###################################################

About Rosie D. Lyles, MD, MHA, MSc, Head of Clinical Affairs for Clorox Healthcare

Rosie D. Lyles, MD, MHA, MSc is the Head of Clinical Affairs for the Clorox Professional Products Company where she serves as a research fellow and primary medical science liaison for the healthcare business, supporting all scientific research as well as clinical and product intervention design and development.
Dr. Lyles previously served as a physician researcher and study director for multiple epidemiologic research initiatives in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Cook County Health and Hospitals System, investigating healthcare-associated infections with a particular focus on the epidemiology and prevention of multidrug-resistant organisms and infections in intensive care units and in long-term acute care hospitals. She has directed numerous clinical studies and interventions for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Chicago Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Prevention Epicenter.
During her nine years as a study director and physician researcher at Hektoen Institute for Medical Research, Dr. Lyles’ work included CDC Epicenters Prevention program studies on bloodstream infections, Clostridium difficile infections and case-control studies of community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). She also performed surveillance studies of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) positive patients, examining universal contact isolation and patient skin antisepsis protocols to identify ways to optimize standard infection control measures.
Dr. Lyles received her medical degree from St. Matthew’s University School of Medicine and holds a Master of Health Service Administration from St. Joseph College. She also recently completed a Master of Science in Clinical Research and Translational Sciences through the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is an active member of the Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, the Infectious Disease Society of America, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and has served as a peer reviewer for the National Institutes of Health, New England Journal of Medicine, and American Journal of Infection Control.
References:
1. Dubberke, ER, et al. Strategies to Prevent Clostridium difficile Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2014, V35:S48-S65
2. Tabak et al., Predicting the Risk for Hospital-onset Clostridium difficile Infection (HO-CDI) at the Time if Inpatient Admission: HO-CDI Risk Score. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2015, 36: 6; 695-701
3. Magill, SS. et al. “Multistate Point-Prevalence Survey of Health Care-Associated Infections.” The New England Journal of Medicine 370.13 (2014): 1198–1208.
4. Dubberke, ER, and Olsen, MA. “Burden of Clostridium Difficile on the Healthcare System.” Clinical infectious diseases 55 Suppl. 2 (2012): S88–92.
5. Septimus, E., et al. “Approaches for preventing Healthcare-associated Infections: Go Long or Go Wide?” Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2014. 35: 7; 797-801