Category Archives: Volunteer Patient Advocate Program

C Diff Foundation Celebrates National Volunteer Week 2017

National Volunteer Week, April 23 – 29th

The C Diff Foundation celebrates National Volunteer Week, April 23 – 29 to recognize more than 150 members of the C Diff Foundation Volunteer Members, including Volunteer Patient Advocates, have collectively donated more than 20,000 hours of volunteer service to the Foundation last year. The theme for this year’s celebration is “Sharing Time, Touching Lives.”

“Through the years the C Diff Foundation Volunteer Members have served as ambassadors of goodwill, service and compassion,” said Angelo Ortiz, C Diff Foundation’s Treasurer and Chairperson of  the Volunteer Patient Advocate Program

The C Diff Foundation, a 501(c) (3)  non-profit organization, established in 2012, and comprised of 100% volunteering professionals dedicated at supporting public health through education and advocating for C. difficile infection (CDI) prevention, treatments, environmental safety, and support worldwide

Not only do the volunteer members provide financial support for the C Diff Foundation’s programs — it is through their dedication and passion that continuously expands the Foundation’s mission.  Some volunteer patient advocates have their own unique C. diff. Survivor Journey which is shared with compassion, dedication, and caring hearts touching patients, students, fellow healthcare professionals,  and residents in the community every day.

Volunteer members will be recognized on November 9th & 10th  during the C Diff Foundation’s
5th Annual International C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health EXPO being hosted
in Las Vegas, NV.  During the annual event the “Volunteer Shooting Star” awards will
be presented along with numerous Volunteer Patient Advocate certificates for service hours.

“We are fortunate to have such kind and giving volunteers,” said Nancy C. Caralla, Foundress and Executive Director of the C Diff Foundation, “It is an honor to recognize those who have selflessly given so much to help educate, and promote the Foundation’s mission worldwide.”

The C Diff Foundation Volunteer Program was organized in 2012 to provide volunteer services, promote community understanding of Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) CDI  Infection Prevention, Treatments, Environmental Safety and Support and to raise funds for special C Diff Foundation patient/family programs.

The C Diff Foundation Members, with  the Volunteer Patient Advocates, successfully promote
C. diff. Awareness”  nationwide and in fifty-six  (56) countries and host a
U.S. Nationwide information Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) to support health care providers, patients, and families guiding them through the difficulties caused by a C. diff. infection.

Volunteers Members serve in 12 different committees;  Volunteers host monthly teleconference support sessions; Provide Education about C. diff. infection and other linked healthcare topics through workshops, community events, and literature with patients, their families, and residents from villages to cities around the globe; Triage Nurses assist patients, families, clinicians with answers to prevention, treatment, environmental safety and support questions Monday – Friday 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. EST;  Register support session participants,; Provide IT management; Give clerical and social media assistance to various departments;  Provide a “Global Broadcasting Network” with www.cdiffradio.com with their educational radio
program,C. diff. Spores and More which broadcasts live every Tuesday at 1:00 p.m. EST. We are grateful for our sponsor Clorox Healthcare for making this program possible.  Each episode becomes a podcast and is accessible from the C. diff. Spores and More living library located on the main cdiffradio.com program page. Each November the Volunteer Members gather at the annual conference to both present and provide assistance in making the attendees feel welcome and expand their knowledge base on a variety of health topics that are linked to the main topic ~ Clostridium difficile infections.

For more information about the C Diff Foundation Volunteer Program, please call 919-201-1512 (toll free in USA 1-844-367-2343 ) or e-mail:   info@cdifffoundation.org

 

C Diff Foundation Volunteers — Helping Us  Help Others and The Beacon Of Light On the Other Side Of Pain and Suffering.

 

 

 

Highlights Of the Latest Advances In the Battle Against the Deadly Pathogen – Dale Gerding, MD

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TO READ THIS ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY AS PUBLISHED IN THE MD MAGAZINE — PLEASE CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINK TO BE REDIRECTED:

 

http://www.mdmag.com/medical-news/c-diff-foundation-highlights-latest-advances-in-the-battle-against-the-deadly-pathogen

In September, researchers, health care workers, and industry and patient advocates convened for the 4th Annual International Raising C. diff Awareness Conference and Health Expo in Atlanta.

Clifford McDonald, MD, Associate Director for Science in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), chaired the conference. In his role at the CDC, McDonald’s at the forefront of efforts to prevent and treat the infection – one the CDC has declared among the most urgent drug-resistant threats that we currently face.

“It’s my firm belief that we are on the threshold of a new era in better diagnosis, treatment, and prevention approaches. At the CDC, we deal with statistics, but there are faces behind those numbers. At the heart of every infection is a patient who deserves our competence, our empathy, and our passion,” said McDonald.

One of those faces, Roy Poole, is a volunteer patient advocate for the  C Diff Foundation. After retiring from a career in the Air Force, Poole led a healthy, active lifestyle as an avid outdoors-man in Colorado before antibiotics prescribed for a routine dental procedure set the stage for CDI. In the medical community, his symptoms were met with disbelief and inappropriate treatment.

“Three weeks after leaving the hospital, I walked into my (previous) primary care physician, and asked for an order to have a stool sample taken to determine if Toxins A or B were present. His response was, ‘Are you still having problems with that?’ Clearly, there is a need for more education about C. diff among physicians,” said Poole.

CDI is a formidable opponent. However, with the newly focused attention on discovering ways to disable the bacteria and cohesive public health approaches aimed at prevention, presenters from government, academia and industry offered five key reasons we can win the battle against C. diff:

Antibiotic stewardship efforts are gaining a foothold.
Statistics present a chilling picture: 453,000 new cases and an estimated 30,000 deaths each year. It’s likely that those numbers grossly underestimate the true impact of CDI, since it’s what we know from death certificate reporting.

However, we are seeing that rates may have peaked after a long plateau. Mark Wilcox, MD, Head of Microbiology at Leeds Teaching Hospital, Professor of Medical Microbiology at University of Leeds, and the lead on Clostridium difficile for Public Health England in the United Kingdom, has demonstrated a 70% reduction in cases in England in just 7 years. This was after a concerted effort that Wilcox spearheaded surrounding antibiotic stewardship, specifically addressing a reduction in unnecessary prescribing of fluoroquinolones and cephalosporin antibiotics.

Commonly prescribed antibiotics disrupt the protective microbiota (the normal bacteria of the gut) and leave it vulnerable for C. diff colonization. “There was a concerted effort that went beyond lip service and truly embraced the principles of improved surveillance, more accurate diagnostics, enhanced infection prevention measures to use antibiotics more wisely and to limit transmission and careful treatment,” said Wilcox.

High rates of CDI are always associated with the use of certain antibiotics: clindamycin, cephalosporin, and fluoroquinolones. Research has shown that lower respiratory tract infections and urinary tract infections account for more than 50% of all in-patient antibiotics use. But are these really necessary?

“We know that antibiotics are overused and misused across every healthcare setting. At least 30% of antibiotic prescriptions are unnecessary – and this equates to 47 million unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions per year written in doctors’ offices, hospital outpatient departments, and emergency departments. We have a lot of work to do, and CDC is actively working to reduce unnecessary antibiotic use,” said Arjun Srinivasan, MD at the CDC. “Stopping unnecessary antibiotics is the single most effective thing we can do to curb C. diff infections in the United States. This is something that we can do today.”

Srinivasan acknowledged that telling patients that they can’t have a prescription for an antibiotic might result in some pushback. “Patient satisfaction scores are a very real concern. When someone is sick and takes a day off work, they’re not leaving without a prescription – especially when the last provider wrote one for their same symptoms,” he said. “But this is a new day, and it’s up to the physician to educate their patients and stay strong.”

Hospitalists have access to accurate, inexpensive and quick diagnostic tests that can lead to targeted, effective treatment. This can arm the treating physician and patient with information that can put patients on a path to recovery without feeling like they are being dismissed.

Emerging guidance reflects important advances in research and development.

Most recently published in 2010, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Clinical Practice Guidelines for C. diff are currently under review. This is critical because of the number of physicians still treating with metronidazole first, despite the fact that the largest randomized controlled clinical trial has shown that vancomycin is more effective.

“Since 2010, the landscape has changed dramatically,” said Stuart B. Johnson, MD, Professor, Department of Medicine, Loyola University, and Researcher at the Hines VA Hospital in Chicago.

“The past few years have ushered in a new age of understanding how and where C. diff colonizes, and the damaging toxins A and B that it produces.”

Considering that 25-30% of patients experience a CDI recurrence, it’s evident that metronidazole unnecessarily contributes to the failed treatment outcomes for patients. Metronidazole is less expensive, but has more side effects than oral vancomycin and is less effective in treating CDI.

Johnson provided an overview of the dramatic advances this space has seen in just the past few years.

Limitations of current guidelines include:
•       No mention of fidaxomicin, a narrow-spectrum antibiotic, which in 2011 was the first medication approved in 25 years for the treatment of C. diff associated diarrhea
•       Limited evidence for recommendations to treat severe, complicated CDI
•       Limited evidence for recommendations on recurrent CDI
•       Little mention of Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT)

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5.  Patient advocacy and awareness efforts can alter the course of CDI.
CDI survivors shared their experiences along their emotional journey – fear, disbelief, isolation, and depression. They also expressed gratitude at the validation, information and support they received from the patient advocacy community. Perhaps the greatest gift they have received is the empowerment to question their physicians about the necessity of antibiotics they have been prescribed in terms of risk of CDI.

“The hospital where I was treated initially seemed eager to have me leave. They offered no additional help. The C diff Foundation has been my greatest source of help. In turn, I feel I help myself cope best, when I help others to cope with the disease,” said Poole.

TO READ THIS ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY AS PUBLISHED IN THE MD MAGAZINE 

PLEASE CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINK TO BE REDIRECTED —- THANK YOU

http://www.mdmag.com/medical-news/c-diff-foundation-highlights-latest-advances-in-the-battle-against-the-deadly-pathogen

 

Dale Gerding, MD, FACP, FIDSA, is Professor of Medicine at Loyola University Chicago, Research Physician at the Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital. Additionally, Gerding is an infectious disease specialist and hospital epidemiologist, past president of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and past chair of the antibiotic resistance committee of SHEA. He is a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and past chair of the National and Global Public Health Committee and the Antibiotic Resistance Subcommittee of IDSA. His research interests include the epidemiology and prevention of Clostridium difficile, antimicrobial resistance, and antimicrobial distribution and kinetics.

The paper, “Burden of Clostridium difficile Infection in the United States,” was published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The study, “Changing epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection following the intriduction of a national ribotyping-based surveillance scheme in England,” was published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.

The study, “Prevalence of antimicrobial use in US acute care hospitals,” was published in JAMA.

The paper, “Vancomycin, metronidazole, or toleyamer for Clostridium difficile infection: results from two multinaionalm randomized, controlled trials,” was published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

The study, “A Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial of Saccharomyces boulardii in Combination with Standard Antibiotics for Clostridium difficile disease,” was published in JAMA.

Veronica “Raunnie” Edmond, Author, Health Coach, C.diff. And Breast Cancer Survivor Raises CDI Awareness

veronica-edmond

 

Veronica “Raunnie” Edmond, Author, Health Coach,
C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocate, C. diff. and
Stage 3 Breast Cancer Survivor joined us on
September 20th, 2016, at the
4th Annual International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health Expo in Atlanta, Georgia.

Veronica bravely shared her tormenting, painful experience encountered with a C. difficile infection while simultaneously undergoing  treatment for Breast Cancer.

We are grateful for her full recovery from this life-threatening diagnosis and infection and for the positive attitude Veronica has in promoting breast health, wellness, and raising C.diff. awareness.

Thank you Veronica and to all fellow C.diff.  Survivors  www.cdiffsurvivors.org  sharing their inspirational journey

“No one can do this alone ~ All of us can do this together.”

C.diff. Survivor

C.diff. Survivor

 

 

 

 

 

Thanksgiving is a great time to reflect on the year’s blessings, reconnect with family, share a big meal and sometimes get indigestion. Often times, the overindulgence of a variety of foods may cause an upset stomach or stomach bug.

To be blunt, the rapid expansion of the stomach and foods rich in creams, sugar, and fat can cause gas, bloating and diarrhea. In most cases, the stomach discomfort is temporary and, with over-the-counter medicine, the symptoms are gone.

When should you be concerned, if the usual remedies are ineffective to control diarrhea?

One of the answers is when the pain from diarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever is so severe that it lands you in the emergency room. In Veronica “Raunnie” Edmond’s case, she was already hospitalized during her second round of chemotherapy for an aggressive form of stage 3 breast cancer.

Please click on the link below to be redirected to this most admirable story shared by Veronica with Marie Y. Lemelle, Contributing Columnist at Wave Newspapers

http://wavenewspapers.com/health-matters-a-case-of-diarrhea-that-almost-turned-deadly/

 

MarieLemelle2016

Marie Y. Lemelle, MBA, a public relations consultant, is the owner of Platinum Star PR and can be reached on Twitter @PlatinumStar, or Instagram @PlatinumStarPR. Send “Health Matters” related questions to healthmatters@wavepublication.com and look for her column in The Wave.

“What is C. diff.?” One Woman Walked Up To Us And Asked – Then the Crowd Followed

Heather and Kimberly III 7.23.16

The C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocates; Heather Clark and
her sister, Kimberly Reilly participated at local events over the summer season  to educate and advocate
for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety within the local communities raising C. diff. awareness and saving lives.

 

On behalf of the C Diff Foundation , we sincerely thank you Heather and Kimberly for your dedication, your time, and for joining the
C Diff Foundation partnering and sharing our global mission.

We are truly grateful to the many special Volunteer Patient Advocates, the special individuals donating their time in “Raising C. diff. Awareness within their communities” around the globe.  Thank You!

Heather and Kimberly lost their dear Father from C.diff. involvement.  Shortly after his passing,  Heather and Kimberly took a stand with the C Diff Foundation and dedicated their time and efforts in  “Raising C. diff. Awareness” to help educate, and advocate for this life-threatening infection that played a big part in their Father’s passing.

To listen to Heather’s journey, with fellow C. diff. survivors,  – please click on the podcast link below:

http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/85287/c-diff-survivors-share-their-unique-journey-through-a-c-diff-infection-and-how-it-changed-their

“What is C. diff.?”

Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) is gram-positive, anaerobic, and a spore, rod/spindle-shape,
a common bacterium of the human intestine in 2 – 5%. C diff. becomes a serious gastrointestinal infection when individuals have been exposed to antibiotic therapy, and/or have experienced a long-term hospitalization, and/or have had an extended stay in a long-term care facility. However; the risk of acquiring a C diff. infection (CDI) has increased as it is in the community (Community Acquired CDI) and found in outpatient settings.

There are significant risk factors in patients who are immunosuppressant, ones who have been on antibiotic therapy, and the elderly population.

How do Antibiotics cause C diff.? The antibiotics cause a disruption in the normal intestinal flora which leads to an over growth of C difficile bacteria in the colon. The leading antibiotics known to disrupt the normal intestinal flora, yet not limited to, are Ampicillin, Amoxicillin, Cephalosporins, Clindamycin, and the broad spectrum antibiotics.

Since  November 2012 the CDC has shared public announcements regarding antibiotic use: Colds and many ear and sinus infections are caused by viruses, not bacteria. Taking antibiotics to treat a “virus” can make those drugs less effective when you and your family really need them. Limiting the usage of antibiotics will also help limit new cases of CDI.
*Always discuss the symptoms and medications with the treating Physician.

What are C.diff. Symptoms? Symptoms of Clostridium difficile (C.diff.)
C.diff. strains produce several toxins; the most popular are enterotoxin – Clostridium difficile toxin A and cytotoxin – Clostridium difficile toxin B.  Both strains are responsible for the symptoms of diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, fatigue, and can advance to a complication of a severe inflammation of the colon; pseudomembranous colitis, which can also lead to further complications of toxic megacolon.

How is C.diff. Transmitted? Mode of transmission of CDI can be either directly or indirectly, hospital acquired (nosocomial) or community – acquired; Ingesting C.diff spores transmitted from others and patients by hands, or altered normal intestinal flora by antibiotic therapy allowing proliferation of C.diff.  in the colon.  Coming in contact with surfaces, devices, or material with Clostridium difficile spores can easily be transferred to individuals by hands that have touched a contaminated surface or item. Examples of surfaces, devices, and materials contaminated with C.diff. spores in hospital and community/outpatient settings: commodes, bath tubs, showers, hand rails, bed rails, counter tops, handles, clothing, medical equipment, and electronic rectal thermometers.

The C Diff Foundation provide a wide range of programs, such as education, and advocacy for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, support, and environmental safety worldwide, training of volunteer patient advocates (VPA’s) across the globe to provide educational workshops, supplying life-saving medications for those afflicted with this infection from young children to seniors, building satellite branches across the globe, presenting educational workshops in educational programs, improving and expanding the C. difficile infection awareness, providing global tele-conferencing support sessions in mental health counseling, long-term illnesses, the prevention, treatments, environmental safety with nutritional education for patients, and families suffering through a C. difficile infection
and so much more.

We are working together and dedicated at raising C. diff. awareness to witness a decrease in newly diagnosed C. difficile infections worldwide and through dedication and efforts of the
C Diff Foundation Volunteers – we will meet our goals.

Lycoming Fair 7.16.16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Treatments For CDI?   Treating C diff is becoming more challenging to physicians, frustrating to patients, and costly to the health care industry. To date there are three antibiotics effective at treating C diff: Metronidazole is prescribed to treat mild to moderate symptoms and is cost effective (8). Vancomycin is prescribed for moderate to severe symptoms via: oral route as intravenous administration does not achieve gut lumen therapeutic levels. Vancomycin is prescribed to patients with unsuccessful results from the Metronidazole, or the patient is allergic, or pregnant, breastfeeding, or younger than ten years of age.

The most recent antibiotic, Dificid (fidaxomicin) http://www.dificid.com is the first medication approved by FDA to treat C diff. Associated-Diarrhea CDAD in over twenty five years with superiority in sustained clinical response (5) Loperamide, diphenoxylate and bismuth medications are contraindicated as they slow the fecal transit time which extends the toxins in the gastrointestinal system.

The use of Cholestyramine has demonstrated positive results as toxins A and B bind to the resin as it passes through the intestines aiding in slowing bowel motility and assists in decreasing dehydration (9).

C.diff. spores are able to live outside of the body for a very long period of time and are resistant to most routine cleaning agents. It has also been proven that alcohol based hand sanitizers remain ineffective in eradicating C. diff. spores. In 2009 Clorox Commercial Solutions Ultra Clorox Germicidal Bleach ® was named the first and only product to obtain Federal EPA registration for killing C. diff. spores on hard, non porous surfaces when used as directed (1).

Please visit the following Page for additional information:

https://cdifffoundation.org/c-diff-infection-%e2%99%a5-home-care/

 

The CDC also recommends a 1:10 ( 1 cup bleach to 9 cups of water) dilution of bleach and water for cleaning hard non-porous surfaces keeping areas covered with solution for 10 minutes and the solution is to be mixed fresh daily.

Hand hygiene following the guidelines in HAND WASING; it is important to wash hands before entering and exiting a patient’s room (4). The spores are difficult to remove from hands; Universal Contact Precautions remain best practice for healthcare personnel and Contact Precautions for patients with a confirmed diagnosis of CDI. Prevention through education about CDI has proven effective and beneficial to environmental housekeeping departments, health care professionals, administration, patients, and their families (2)

https://cdifffoundation.org/hand-washing-updates/

 

To Join The C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocate Program, please contact us by email info@cdifffoundation.org  or call us toll-free 1-844-FOR-CDIF

 

 

References:

(1) Clorox registered EPA
http://www.ahe.org/ahe/learn/press-releases/2009/20090402_clorox_epa_cdiff.shtml

(2) Clostridium difficile (CDI) Infections thttp://www.cdc.gov/hai/pdfs/toolkits/CDItoolkitwhite_clearance_edits.pdf
(3) Lab Tests and Diagnosis Mayo Clinichttp://www.mayoclinic.com/health/c-difficile/DS00736/DSECTION=tests-and-diagnosis
(4) CDC Hand washing
http://www.cdc.gov/Features/HandWashing/

(5) FDA announcement Dificid
http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm257024.htm

(5) Dificid.com
http://www.dificid.com

(6) Probiotics in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3105609/

(6) Danimals PRNewswire8/Jan2012;
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/dannonr-danimalsr-adds-proven-benefits-of-probiotics-53347947.html

(7) Get smart antibiotics week CDC
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6144a7.htm

(8) Metronidazole
http://www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/flagyl

(9) Cholestyranine
http://www.globalrph.com/cholestyramine.htm

C Diff Foundation’s Volunteer Patient Advocates Promote Their Summer of 2016 Schedule Of Events “Raising C. diff. Awareness™”

VOLUNTEER PT ADVOCATES

C Diff Foundation’s Volunteer Patient Advocates; Heather Clark and Kimberly Reilly

will be “Raising C. diff. Awareness ™”  at the following events over the Summer of 2016.

 ~ Save the dates ~ 

Lycoming County Fair
1 E. Park St, Hughesville, PA 17737
Saturday, July 16 and Saturday, July 23, 2016
10 am to 10 pm

Hart-Parr Oliver Collectors Association National Summer Show
(This is the national tractor show where their Father’s tractor will be on display)
3349 Gehan Road, Canandaigua, NY 14424
Friday, August 12, 2016
* See us in the flea market section of the event; there will be acres of flea market displays
Hours not set, but we will be there all day

Wyoming County Fair
Route 6, Meshoppen, PA 18629
Saturday, September 3, 2016
10 am to 10 pm

 

Stop by their booths to learn more about C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, support, and environmental safety worldwide.

For additional information please
contact the C Diff Foundation office:  1-919-201-1512

A World of Thanks To the C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocates Around the Globe

National Volunteers Week     #NVW2016

 

Did you know that it is  NATIONAL VOLUNTEER WEEK
April 10-16, 2016

President Richard Nixon established National Volunteer Week with an executive order in 1974, as a way to recognize and celebrate the efforts of volunteers. Every sitting U.S. president since Nixon has issued a proclamation during National Volunteer Week (as have many U.S. mayors and governors).  Since then, the original emphasis on celebration has widened; the week has become a nationwide effort to urge people to get out and volunteer in their communities.

To each C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocate, , on behalf of all the staff and the thousands of members around the globe we want to say THANK YOU!

Your continued support and efforts contribute in a significant way to our mission of educating, and advocating for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety awareness worldwide.

November marked our third  year in “Raising C. diff. infection Awareness” campaign and we thank the many organizations who supported and contributed by sharing information with others.  We are all working toward a shared goal in witnessing a reduction of newly diagnosed C. diff. cases and “None of us can do this alone…..all of us can do this TOGETHER!”

We celebrate our volunteers and this week stands as a reminder that our daily work sharing information, educating, and advocating for C. diff. infections, remains not only critical but it is urgent.

We do not know when new interventions to prevent, to treat, and protect our environments with products that will  eradicate C. diff. spores will become available to the public.  The good news is that we do know that there are many positive interventions presently in clinical trials, which give us all HOPE.

Visit the website for updates and feel free to inquire if you or a loved one would be considered a candidate to participate in an ongoing clinical trial:

 https://cdifffoundation.org/clinical-trials-2/

This is why acts of sharing the C Diff Foundation literature during every opportunity quickly opens doors of knowledge helping others learn how to prevent acquiring this painful and life-threatening infection, treatments available, and disinfecting products with EPA Registered C. diff. kill for environmental safety–  to  help save lives.

Reminder that there is always information and support  available and  only a phone call away 1-844-FOR-CDIF

The C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocates build awareness, help build support and provide education of C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety measures  to patients, survivors  their families and community healthcare professional centers/offices.  They also  guide individuals in giving a voice to patients, survivors and their families on healthcare-related infections, informing the public,  health-care providers (hospitals, healthcare professionals, etc.), organizations of health-care professionals, the educational world, with the medical, Governmental agencies, and pharmaceutical research communities.

We provide our Volunteer Patient Advocates with the necessary tools, and updates to generate positive results.

Do you have a few extra minutes to share vital information with others to raise C diff. infection awareness in your community?

By becoming a C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocate you will make a BIG difference and help spare others the pain, suffering, and tragedy of loosing a loved one that is caused by a C. diff. infection.

Contact our office for additional information and register today by e-mailing the C Diff Foundation your name and a valid mailing address to receive an official  C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocate Packet

info@cdifffoundation.org

On this day, and throughout the year ahead, we want you to be confident that your Volunteer Membership in the Foundation is bringing important information out into the communities and throughout the world through the educational brochures, cards, letters, and from sharing your own personal experiences with others.  Please be sure to share your journey with others in need of “HOPE” on the C. diff. Survivors Alliance Network website  http://www.cdiffsurvivors.org

Your continued donations received during the year are always appreciated. Your gifts assist the Foundation in promoting C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety education, and advocacy to healthcare professionals, families, patients, and communities world-wide.  We are grateful for your assistance, dedication, and support and we hope the Foundation has also been helpful to you.  If you have any suggestions about how we can serve others better or share the information more effectively, please let us know.  You are welcome to email, telephone, or write to the Foundation at any time.

We certainly look forward to your continued Volunteer Membership in the Foundation.  There is so much more that needs to be accomplished and we continue to move forward together promoting our mission, which is entirely dedicated for the good of others.

May you and your families experience continued HOPE for good health, happiness, and peace throughout the year.

Thank You for helping prevent further pain and suffering worldwide by sharing in the

C Diff Foundation’s mission today.

 

Dr Hudson Garrett, Jr Is Elected Chairman Of the Education Committee Of the C Diff Foundation

HGarrett (2)

 

We are pleased to announce that Dr. Hudson Garrett, Jr., PhD, MSN, MPH, FNP, CSRN, VA-BC, CDONA,FACONA,DON-CLTC™ , C-NAC™ , PLNC  has been elected  to
Chairman of the Education Committee of the C Diff Foundation.

 

Dr. Garrett will be overseeing, and developing the Foundation’s volunteer patient advocate (VPA) program, healthcare workshops and programs for both patients and clinicians.  As a member of the Foundation’s Research and Development committee, Dr. Garrett provided great support.

Dr. Garrett is aiding in the development of patient and clinician focused C.diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network episodes and discussing  leading healthcare
topics — as our global listeners span across 56 countries and counting.

Dr. Hudson Garrett is currently employed as the VP, Clinical Affairs for PDI, Inc. and NIce-Pak, and is responsible for the global Clinical Affairs program and also the Medical Science Liaison program for all divisions within the company. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology/Chemistry and Nursing, a dual Masters in Nursing and Public Health, Post-Masters Certificate as a Family Nurse Practitioner, a Post-Masters Certificate in Infection Prevention and Infection Control and a PhD in Healthcare Administration and Policy. He has completed the Johns Hopkins Fellows Program in Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, and the CDC Fundamentals of Healthcare Epidemiology program, and is board certified in family practice, critical care, vascular assess, moderate sedation, legal nurse consulting, and a director of nursing in long term care.  Dr. Garrett is also a Fellow in the Academy of National Associations of Directors of Nursing Administration in Long Term Care.

Dr. Garrett currently serves on the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Pediatric Subcommittee, as President of the Board of Directors, for the Vascular Access Certification Corporation, is the past Education Chair for the Greater Atlanta Chapter of the Association for Professionals In Infection Control and Epidemiology Board of Directors, a National Faculty Member for the Emergency Care and Safety Institute, President of the Board of Directors for the Southeast Chapter of the Infusion Nurses Society, the Industry Liaison for the Board of Directors for the Association for the Healthcare Environment, a member of the Clinical Practices Advisory Committee for the Association for Vascular Access, and a past member of the Recommended Practices Advisory Board for the Association of Peri-operative Registered Nurses. In addition, Dr. Garrett received a Presidential Citation from the Society of Critical Care Medicine in 2011 in recognition for his advancement of critical care nursing and infection prevention.

He also serves as the Industry Liaison for the Assoc. for the Healthcare Environment Board of Directors, is the lead faculty member for the Assoc. for the Healthcare Environment’s Online Certificate Program in the Essentials of Infection Prevention for Environmental Services Professionals, two time nominee for the Assoc. for Vascular Access Herbst Award, served as a reviewer for the 2013 Best Practices in Adult Peripheral Vascular Access Resource Guide for the Assoc. of Vascular Access, currently the second author for the second revision of the Assoc. for Vascular Access Pediatric Special Interest Organization Guidelines which is scheduled to be released in 2015, also an author for the AVA CVC Best Practices Resource guide. He was also recognized as a 2013 “Who’s who in Infection Prevention and Control” by Infection Control Magazine.

Dr. Garrett has published in many publications including Infection Control Today, Managing Infection Control, Provider, The Assisted Living Journal, and in the American Journal of Long Term Care, American Journal of Critical Care, and also in several Mosby Saunders medical textbooks to name a few.

He is currently an active member of many professional organizations including:
Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, the Association for the Healthcare Environment, the Society of Hospital Epidemiology of America, Infectious Disease Society of America, Association for Vascular Access, Infusion Nurses Society, American Society for Professionals in Patient Safety, Society of Critical Care Medicine, Assoc. for Peri-operative Registered Nurses, American Medical Directors Assoc., American Assoc. of Moderate Sedation Nurses, American College of Healthcare Executives, Nat’l Assoc. of Directors of Nursing in Long Term Care, American Assoc. for Long Term Care Nursing, American Assoc. of Nurse Assessment Coordinators, and American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

Dr. Hudson Garrett is passionate about delivering unsurpassed material and provides excellent support on every level. We are fortunate to have Dr. Hudson Garrett, Jr. leading the Foundation’s Education Committee.  Please join us in congratulating him on his new, well-deserved position.

 

Nancy C. Caralla, Founder, Executive Director
With the C Diff Foundation Board of Directors, Chairpersons and Committee Members