Tag Archives: Gastroenterology

Study Investigators Find Combination of Vancomycin and FMT Superior In Treating Recurrent C.difficile Infection (rCDI)

The combination of vancomycin and fecal microbiota transplantation was found to be superior to fidaxomicin or vancomycin in the treatment of patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI), according to a study published in Gastroenterology.

This randomized, single-center trial was designed to compare the efficacy of fecal microbiota transplantation with that of fidaxomicin and vancomycin.

Sixty-four adults with recurrent CDI seen at a gastroenterology clinic in Denmark between April 5, 2016 and June 10, 2018 were randomly assigned to a group receiving fecal microbiota transplantation applied by colonoscopy or nasojejunal tube after 4 to 10 days of 125 mg vancomycin 4 times daily (n=24), or 10 days of 200 mg fidaxomicin 2 times daily (n=24), or 10 days of 125 mg vancomycin 4 times daily (n=16).

Patients experiencing a CDI recurrence after this course of treatment, and those who could not be randomly assigned were provided rescue fecal microbiota transplantation. The primary study outcome was combined clinical resolution and negative polymerase chain reaction test for C difficile toxin at 8 weeks post-treatment, and secondary end points included week 8 clinical resolution.

The combination of negative C difficile test results and clinical resolution was observed in 71% of the 24 participants who received fecal microbiota transplantation (95% CI, 49-87%; n=17), 33% of the 24 participants who received fidaxomicin (95% CI, 16-55%; n=8), and 19% of the 16 participants (95% CI, 5-46%; n=3) who received vancomycin (fecal microbiota transplantation vs fidaxomicinP=.009; fecal microbiota transplantation vs vancomycin, P=.001; fidaxomicin vs vancomycin, P=.31). Clinical resolution was observed in 92% of participants who received fecal microbiota transplantation (n=22; P=.0002), 42% of participants who were treated with fidaxomicin (n=10; <.0001), and 19% of participants who were treated with vancomycin (n=3; P=.13). No significant differences in results were seen between patients receiving initial fecal microbiota transplantation therapy and those who received rescue treatment with such a transplant.

Of note, adverse events (transient abdominal pain, constipation, bloating and diarrhea) were observed in 10 of the participants who received a fecal microbiota transplant, 1 of which was classified as severe.

Researchers noted limitation of a lack of patients with C difficile ribotype 027, such that results may not be generalizable to settings with a high ribotype 027 frequency. Study interventions were also unblinded, introducing the possibility of observer bias, although the C difficile toxin test was applied to all patients at all time points in an effort to obtain objective outcome measures.

Study investigators concluded, “[fecal microbiota transplantation] was superior to both fidaxomicin and vancomycin monotherapies for [recurrent] CDI, with regard to both combined clinical and microbiological resolution and clinical resolution alone.”

Reference

https://www.infectiousdiseaseadvisor.com/respiratory/new-powder-formulation-tuberculosis-vaccine-candidate-is-in-human-trial/article/829508/

Hvas CL, Jørgensen SMD, Jørgensen SP, et al. Fecal microbiota transplantation is superior to fidaxomicin for treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection [published online January 2, 2019]. Gastroenterology. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2018.12.019

Severe Cases of C.diff. Infection (CDI)Study Suggests the Most Routinely Prescribed Antibiotic Is Not the Best Treatment

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Over the past two decades there has been a sharp rise in the number and severity of infections caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile  (C. diff ) now the most common healthcare-acquired infection in the United States.

 

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https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-02/uou-rpa020117.php

But a new study suggests that the most routinely prescribed antibiotic is not the best treatment for severe cases. Scientists at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System and University of Utah report that patients with a severe C. diff infection (CDI) were less likely to die when treated with the antibiotic vancomycin compared to the standard treatment of metronidazole.

The findings will be published online on Feb. 6, 2017 on the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine website.

C. diff does not cause illness outright. The bacterium produces two chemicals that are toxic to the human body. These toxins work in concert to irritate the cells of the Large intestinal lining producing the symptoms associated with the illness. Symptoms of CDI include watery diarrhea, fever, loss of appetite, nausea, and abdominal pain and tenderness. Severe cases are associated with inflammation of the colon.

Current guidelines primarily recommend two antibiotics metronidazole or vancomycin to treat CDI. While vancomycin was the original treatment, the medical community has favored metronidazole for the past few decades, because it is less expensive and will limit vancomycin resistance in other hospital-acquired infections. The guidelines are based on small clinical trials carried out about 30 years ago.

“For many years the two antibiotics were considered to be equivalent in their ability to cure C. diff and prevent recurrent disease,” says Stevens. “Our work and several other studies show that this isn’t always the case.” In the current issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, the research team looked at the effectiveness of the two drugs by comparing the risk of mortality after treatment with these two antibiotics.

The investigators conducted the largest study to date by examining the data from more than 10,000 patients treated for CDI through the US Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare system from 2005 to 2012. A severe case of CDI was defined as a patient with an elevated white blood cell count or serum creatinine within four days of the CDI diagnosis. A mild to moderate case of CDI was defined as a patient with normal white blood cell counts and creatinine levels. About 35 percent of cases in this study were considered severe.

Patients with a severe case of CDI had lower mortality rates when treated with vancomycin compared to metronidazole (15.3 percent versus 19.8 percent). The scientists calculated that only 25 patients with severe CDI would need to be treated with vancomycin to prevent one death. “That is a powerful, positive outcome for our patient’s well-being,” explains Stevens. She cautions that the researchers still do not understand how the choice of antibiotic affects mortality rates.

“Although antibiotics are one of the greatest miracles of modern medicine, there are still tremendous gaps in our knowledge about when and how to use them to give our patients the best health outcomes,” explains Michael Rubin, M.D., Ph.D., an associate professor in internal medicine and an investigator at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System.

“This research shows that if providers choose vancomycin over metronidazole to treat patients with severe CDI, it should result in a lower risk of death for those critically ill patients,” said Rubin. This study showed that less than 15 percent of CDI patients, including severe cases, received vancomycin.

The study results did not show a difference in the rate of the illness returning following either antibiotic treatment whether the initial illness was mild to moderate or severe. Nor did it show a difference for the rate of death following either antibiotic treatment for mild to moderate CDI cases.

Stevens cautions that the study was observational in nature and does not prove cause and effect of the drug. In addition, the study focused on patients that were primarily men; however, past studies show that the C. diff treatment outcomes for men and women were similar.

According to Stevens, future work should balance the targeted application of vancomycin treatment, especially for severe CDI cases, with economic considerations and the consequences of antibiotic resistance. “The optimal way to move forward is to do decision analysis that allows us to weigh the pros and cons of the various treatment strategies,” she says.

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The research was funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, Office of Research and Development, Health Services Research and Development.

In addition to Stevens and Rubin, co-authors include Richard Nelson, Karim Khader, Makoto Jones, Lindsay Croft and Matthew Samore (University of Utah and the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System), Elyse Schwab-Daugherty and Kevin A. Brown (Public Health Ontario and University of Toronto), Tom Greene (University of Utah), Melinda Neuhauser (VA Pharmacy Benefits Management Services) and Peter Glassman and Matthew Bidwell Goetz (VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System).

Summit Therapeutics plc Outlines Phase 3 Program for Novel C. difficile Infection Antibiotic Ridinilazole

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Clostridium difficile Treatment – Phase 3 program outline —

 

SUMMIT OUTLINES PHASE 3 PROGRAMME FOR NOVEL CDI ANTIBIOTIC RIDINILAZOLE FOLLOWING FDA AND EMA REGULATORY MEETINGS

Oxford, UK, On 1 February 2017 – Summit Therapeutics plc
the drug discovery and development company advancing therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and C. difficile infection (‘CDI’),  outlines its Phase 3 programme for its novel antibiotic, ridinilazole, following recent regulatory meetings with the US Food and Drug Administration (‘FDA’) and European Medicines Agency (‘EMA’).

With input from the FDA and EMA, Summit intends to design the Phase 3 clinical programme to evaluate superiority of ridinilazole over standard of care in the treatment of C. diffiicle Infection (CDI).

A positive Phase 3 result on superiority has the potential to support the commercial launch of ridinilazole as a differentiated therapy that can both treat initial CDI and reduce disease recurrence.

Mr Glyn Edwards, Chief Executive Officer of Summit commented: “The constructive end of Phase 2 meetings with the US and European regulators have enabled us to design a Phase 3 programme that focuses on evaluating ridinilazole’s superiority over standard of care. This is something we believe would help differentiate our novel class antibiotic from currently marketed CDI treatments and those in late-stage development. Superiority in the combined measure of treatment of initial infection and importantly, reduction in recurrence, could position ridinilazole for front-line treatment of CDI.”
Summit discussed its Phase 3 development programme with the FDA at an End of Phase 2 meeting and through a scientific advice process with EMA. With input from both agencies, the Phase 3 programme is expected to include two trials evaluating ridinilazole as compared to the standard of care, vancomycin, each of which would enrol approximately 700 patients with CDI with the primary endpoint being superiority in sustained clinical response (‘SCR’). Other planned endpoints will include health economic outcome measures. The Phase 3 trial designs are consistent with the successful proof of concept Phase 2 trial, CoDIFy, in which ridinilazole achieved statistical superiority over vancomycin in SCR. SCR is a combined endpoint that measures cure at the end of treatment and a lack of recurrence in the 30 days after treatment. FDA also confirmed that ridinilazole would be eligible for Priority Review based on its QIDP designation.
Mr Edwards continued: “As we continue to evaluate our options to maximize the value of ridinilazole, our stronger financial position following the DMD programme partnership with Sarepta Therapeutics, Inc. means Summit has more time to fully explore all options. These include potentially entering into a collaboration with a third party or securing meaningful non-dilutive funding from government and charitable organizations. In parallel, activities

About Ridinilazole
Ridinilazole is an orally administered small molecule antibiotic that Summit is developing specifically for the treatment of CDI.

In preclinical efficacy studies, ridinilazole exhibited a narrow spectrum of activity and had a potent bactericidal effect against all clinical isolates of C. difficile tested. In a Phase 2 proof of concept trial in CDI patients, ridinilazole showed statistical superiority in sustained clinical response (‘SCR’) rates compared to the standard of care, vancomycin. In this trial, SCR was defined as clinical cure at end of treatment and no recurrence of CDI within 30 days of the end of therapy. Ridinilazole has received Qualified Infectious Disease Product (‘QIDP’) designation and has been granted Fast Track designation by the US Food and Drug Administration. The QIDP incentives are provided through the US GAIN Act and include an extension of marketing exclusivity for an additional five years upon FDA approval.

About Summit Therapeutics
Summit is a biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of novel medicines for indications for which there are no existing or only inadequate therapies. Summit is conducting clinical programs focused on the genetic disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the infectious disease C. difficile infection.

Resources:

http://www.summitplc.com/media/press-releases/

Antibiotics; The Main Source Of C. diff. Epidemic Found Through Most Recent UK Study

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As published by

University of Leeds  UK

 

Restricting the use of a common antibiotic was more important than a high profile ‘deep clean’ of hospitals in massively reducing UK antibiotic resistant Clostridium difficile, a major study found.

“These findings are of international importance because other regions such as North America, where fluoroquinolone prescribing remains unrestricted, still suffer from epidemic numbers of C. diff infections.”

http://www.leeds.ac.uk/news/article/3978/overuse_of_antibiotics_the_main_cause_of_c_diff_epidemic

The study concluded that overuse of antibiotics like ciprofloxacin led to the outbreak of severe diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile (C.diff) that hit headlines from 2006 onward. The outbreak was stopped by substantially reducing use of ciprofloxacin and related antibiotics.

Inappropriate use and widespread over prescribing of fluoroquinolone antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin in fact allowed C. diff bugs that were resistant to the drug to thrive, because non-resistant bugs in the gut were killed off by the antibiotic, leaving the way clear for rapid growth of resistant C. diff.

Concerns about hospital ‘superbugs’ which had become resistant to common antibiotics resulted in the announcement of a program of “deep cleaning” and other infection control measures in the NHS in 2007.

The study, by the University of Leeds, University of Oxford and Public Health England published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, found that cases of C. diff fell only when fluoroquinolone use was restricted and used in a more targeted way as one part of many efforts to control the outbreak.

The restriction of fluoroquinolones resulted in the disappearance in the vast majority of cases of the infections caused by the antibiotic-resistant C. diff, leading to around an 80% fall in the number of these infections in the UK (in Oxfordshire approximately 67% of C. diff bugs were antibiotic-resistant in September 2006, compared to only approximately 3% in February 2013).

In contrast, the smaller number of cases caused by C. diff bugs that were not resistant to fluoroquinolone antibiotics stayed the same. Incidence of these non-resistant bugs did not increase due to patients being given the antibiotic, and so were not affected when it was restricted.

At the same time, the number of bugs that were transmitted between people in hospitals did not change. This was despite the implementation of comprehensive infection prevention and control measures, like better hand-washing and hospital cleaning in this case.

The study’s authors therefore conclude that ensuring antibiotics are used appropriately is the most important way to control the C. diff superbug.

The authors note that it is important that good hand hygiene and infection control continues to be practiced to control the spread of other infections.

The study analyzed data on the numbers of C. diff infections and amounts of antibiotics used in hospitals and by GPs in the UK.

More than 4,000 C. diff bugs also underwent genetic analysis using a technique called whole genome sequencing, to work out which antibiotics each bug was resistant to.

Co-author Derrick Crook, Professor of Microbiology, University of Oxford said: “Alarming increases in UK hospital infections and fatalities caused by C. diff made headline news during the mid-2000s and led to accusations of serious failings in infection control.

“Emergency measures such as ‘deep cleaning’ and careful antibiotic prescribing were introduced and numbers of C. diff infections gradually fell by 80% but no-one was sure precisely why.

“Our study shows that the C. diff epidemic was an unintended consequence of intensive use of an antibiotic class, fluoroquinolones, and control was achieved by specifically reducing use of this antibiotic class, because only the C. diff bugs that were resistant to fluoroquinolones went away.

“Reducing the type of antibiotics like ciprofloxacin was, therefore, the best way of stopping this national epidemic of C. diff and routine, expensive deep cleaning was unnecessary. However it is important that good hand hygiene continues to be practiced to control the spread of other infections.

“These findings are of international importance because other regions such as North America, where fluoroquinolone prescribing remains unrestricted, still suffer from epidemic numbers of C. diff infections.”

Co-author Prof Mark Wilcox, Professor of Microbiology, University of Leeds, said: “Our results mean that we now understand much more about what really drove the UK epidemic of C. diff infection in the mid-2000s.

“Crucially, part of the reason why some C. diff strains cause so many infections is because they find a way to exploit modern medical practice.

“Similar C. diff bugs that affected the UK have spread around the world, and so it is plausible that targeted antibiotic control could help achieve large reductions in C. diff infections in other countries.”

The funding for the study came from the UK Clinical Research Collaboration, (Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, National Institute for Health Research); NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre; NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Healthcare Associated Infections and Antibiotic Resistance, University of Oxford in partnership with Leeds University and Public Health England; NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Modelling Methodology, Imperial College London in partnership with Public Health England; and the Health Innovation Challenge Fund.

Further information:  Source:

Contact Sophie Freeman in the University of Leeds

press office on 0113 343 8059 or email s.j.freeman@leeds.ac.uk

 

Synthetic Biologics SYN-004 (ribaxamase) Achieves Primary Endpoint in Phase 2b Trial for C. difficile Infection

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Synthetic Biologics’ SYN-004 (ribaxamase) Achieves Primary Endpoint
in Phase 2b Trial for C. difficile Infection (CDI)

 

Synthetic Biologics, Inc. a late-stage clinical company developing therapeutics
that preserve the microbiome to protect and restore the health of patients, today
announced positive topline data from its Phase 2b clinical trial for SYN-004 (ribaxamase),
the Company’s first-in-class oral enzyme designed to protect the gut microbiome
from disruption caused by certain intravenous (IV) beta-lactam antibiotics.

The study, a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial of 412 patients, met its primary endpoint of significantly reducing C. difficile Infection (CDI). Preliminary analysis of the data indicated seven confirmed cases of CDI in the placebo group compared to two cases in the ribaxamase treatment group. Patients receiving ribaxamase achieved a 71.4% relative risk reduction (p-value=0.045) in CDI rates compared to patients receiving placebo. Adverse events reported during this trial were comparable between treatment and placebo arms.

Synthetic Biologics is also in the process of analyzing data from several exploratory endpoints that were designed to evaluate ribaxamase’s ability to protect the gut microbiome from colonization by opportunistic bacteria such as C. difficile and other antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Preliminary analysis of the data demonstrated a significant reduction in new colonization by vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) for patients receiving ribaxamase compared to placebo (p-value=0.0002). With agreement from the FDA, the study included a secondary endpoint to assess ribaxamase’s capacity to decrease the incidence of antibiotic-associated diarrhea from all causes. Preliminary analysis of the data suggested a trend towards such a reduction (p-value=0.13), which was due, for the most part, to the reduction of CDI.

These data are consistent with ribaxamase’s mechanism of action designed to protect and preserve the natural balance of the gut microbiome from the unintended effects of IV antibiotic use. The Company expects to share additional results from these exploratory endpoints as they become available later this year, including results focused on ribaxamase’s ability to prevent the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in the gut microbiome.

“These trial results provide a compelling demonstration of the potential of ribaxamase to help address the serious health impacts associated with CDI and infections from other opportunistic bacteria resulting from dysbiosis of the gut microbiome,” said Joseph Sliman, MD, SVP, Clinical and Regulatory Affairs. “More than 453,0001 patients are diagnosed with CDI annually in the U.S., resulting in approximately 29,0001 deaths as well as significant and sometimes prolonged illness. Ribaxamase has the potential to shorten hospital stays, diminish morbidity and mortality and reduce the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms in the gut microbiome by protecting patients from primary C. difficile infection resulting from IV antibiotic use.”

In addition to causing significant suffering and mortality, CDI adds an estimated economic burden of nearly $1.5 billion1 to the healthcare system each year, which could potentially be reduced with an effective therapeutic.

“The reduction in the relative risk of CDI represents a significant milestone in the clinical development of ribaxamase and we believe provides further validation for our approach to advancing cutting edge microbiome science,” said Jeffrey Riley, President and Chief Executive Officer. “These findings also help further our goals to bring the first ever microbiome-focused therapeutic to patients and to help illuminate the potential of this drug class to address serious diseases and public health concerns. We expect to share additional data from exploratory endpoints in the coming months and look forward to continuing ongoing and productive discussions with both the FDA and CDC on the protocol for Phase 3 pivotal trials for ribaxamase.”

Synthetic Biologics is also continuing to prepare for the initiation of pivotal Phase 2b/3 clinical trials for SYN-010, the Company’s proprietary, modified-release formulation of lovastatin lactone designed to treat the underlying cause of irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C).

Presentation Planned for Biotech Showcase 2017 Conference

Date: Monday, January 9, 2017
Time: 9:30 a.m. (PT) / 12:30 p.m. (ET)
Location: Hilton San Francisco Union Square, San Francisco, CA

A live webcast of Synthetic Biologics’ presentation may be accessed by logging onto the internet at https://event.webcasts.com/viewer/event.jsp?ei=1130367. After the presentation, a replay will be archived and accessible for 90 days at the same website.

About SYN-004 (ribaxamase) and the Phase 2b Study

SYN-004 (ribaxamase) is a first-in-class oral enzyme designed to degrade certain IV beta-lactam antibiotics within the GI tract and maintain the natural balance of the gut microbiome for the prevention of CDI, AAD and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms. The Phase 2b proof-of-concept clinical trial is intended to evaluate the effectiveness of ribaxamase to prevent the onset of primary C. difficile infection (CDI), antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms in patients hospitalized with a lower respiratory infection and receiving IV ceftriaxone. A total of 412 subjects were randomized in a 1:1 ratio receiving either 150 mg dose strength of SYN-004 (ribaxamase) or placebo orally QID from Day 1 and until 72 hours following their last treatment of IV ceftriaxone. The sample size was determined to provide 80% power to detect the treatment effect with a one-sided alpha of 0.05. P-values were determined based on a 1-sided z-test for the comparison of the treatment difference as pre-specified in the statistical analysis plan. To access the ribaxamase mechanism of action video on Synthetic Biologics’ website, please click here.

About Synthetic Biologics, Inc.

Synthetic Biologics, Inc. (NYSE MKT: SYN) is a late-stage clinical company developing therapeutics that preserve the microbiome to protect and restore the health of patients. The Company’s lead candidates poised for Phase 3 development are: (1) SYN-010 which is intended to reduce the impact of methane producing organisms in the gut microbiome to treat an underlying cause of irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C), and (2) SYN-004 (ribaxamase) which is designed to protect the gut microbiome from the effects of certain commonly used intravenous (IV) beta-lactam antibiotics for the prevention of C. difficile infection, antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms. The Company is also developing preclinical stage monoclonal antibody therapies for the prevention and treatment of pertussis and novel discovery stage biotherapeutics for the treatment of phenylketonuria (PKU). For more information, please visit Synthetic Biologics’ website at www.syntheticbiologics.com.

This release includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology such as “may,” “should,” “potential,” “continue,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “estimates” and similar expressions and include statements regarding the potential of ribaxamase to help address the serious health impacts associated with CDI and infections from other opportunistic bacteria resulting from dysbiosis of the gut microbiome, the industry data regarding the expected incidence and economic burden of CDI, the potential of ribaxamase to shorten hospital stays, diminish morbidity and mortality and reduce the emergence of antibiotic resistant organisms in the gut microbiome by protecting patients from primary C. difficile infection resulting from IV antibiotic use, the potential to reduce the economic burden to the healthcare system from an effective therapeutic, the suggested trend toward a reduction of incidence of antibiotic-associated diarrhea from all causes, the expected timing of data release of exploratory endpoints of the trial focused on the ability of ribaxamase to prevent the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms in the gut microbiome, the continued ongoing discussions with the FDA and CDC, validation for our approach to advancing cutting edge microbiome science, the continued preparation  for the initiation of pivotal Phase 2b/3 clinical trials for SYN-010, the potential of the drug class to address serious diseases and public health concerns, the ability of SYN-004 to protect the gut microbiome from the effects of certain commonly used IV beta-lactam antibiotics for the prevention of  C. difficile infection, antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms. These forward-looking statements are based on management’s expectations and assumptions as of the date of this press release and are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those set forth or implied by any forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations include, among others, Synthetic Biologics’ product candidates demonstrating safety and effectiveness, as well as results that are consistent with prior results, Synthetic Biologics’ ability to initiate clinical trials and if initiated, to complete them on time and achieve desired results and benefits, Synthetic Biologics’ clinical trials continuing enrollment as expected, Synthetic Biologics’ ability to obtain regulatory approvals for commercialization of product candidates or to comply with ongoing regulatory requirements, regulatory limitations relating to Synthetic Biologics’ ability to promote or commercialize its product candidates for specific indications, acceptance of its product candidates in the marketplace and the successful development, marketing or sale of Synthetic Biologics’ products by competitors that render Synthetic Biologics’ products obsolete or non-competitive, Synthetic Biologics’ ability to maintain its license agreements, the continued maintenance and growth of Synthetic Biologics’ patent estate, Synthetic Biologics becoming and remaining profitable, Synthetic Biologics’ ability to establish and maintain collaborations, Synthetic Biologics’ ability to obtain or maintain the capital or grants necessary to fund its research and development activities, a loss of any of Synthetic Biologics’ key scientists or management personnel, and other factors described in Synthetic Biologics’ Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015 and its other filings with the SEC, including subsequent periodic reports on Forms 10-Q and 8-K.The information in this release is provided only as of the date of this release, and Synthetic Biologics undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained in this release on account of new information, future events, or otherwise, except as required by law.

1: Leffler DA et al. N Engl J Med 2015; 372: 1539-1548

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/synthetic-biologics-syn-004-ribaxamase-achieves-primary-endpoint-in-phase-2b-trial-for-c-difficile-infection-cdi-300386140.html

SOURCE Synthetic Biologics, Inc.

Rebiotix Treats First Patient In Phase 1 Study of RBX7455 Oral Capsule – A Formulation of Rebiotix’s Microbiota Restoration Therapy (MRT)

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Rebiotix Treats First Patient in Phase 1 Study of RBX7455, an Orally Delivered Broad-Spectrum Non-Frozen MicrobiotaROSEVILLE, Minn., Jan. 4, 2017

 

Rebiotix Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company focused on harnessing the power of the human microbiome to treat challenging diseases, announced today that the first patient has been treated in a Phase 1 study of RBX7455 for the prevention of recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infection.

RBX7455 is a lyophilized non-frozen oral capsule formulation of Rebiotix’s Microbiota Restoration Therapy (MRT), a standardized, stabilized drug technology that is designed to rehabilitate the human microbiome by delivering a broad spectrum of live microbes into a patient’s intestinal tract via a ready-to-use and easy-to-administer format.

RBX7455 lyophilized capsules remove the need for patients to keep the product frozen or refrigerated.

This prospective, single center, two-arm Phase 1 study is a proof of concept dosing study of RBX7455 for the prevention of recurrent C. diff. infection, an increasingly difficult-to-resolve intestinal infection that causes approximately 29,000 deaths in the U.S. each year.1 It is also the first clinical study of an oral microbiota therapy that allows the patient to take the medication at home.

  • RBX7455 requires no special handling or storage needs for patients. The study will enroll approximately 20 patients at a single U.S. site and is being conducted by the Mayo Clinic, a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care, research and education.

“New therapies are urgently needed to prevent recurrent C. diff., a debilitating, costly and potentially life-threatening infection,” said Dr. Sahil Khanna, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, who is leading the study. “RBX7455 not only provides standardized and stabilized human microbes orally, but may provide several advantages in terms of patient dosing and therapy accessibility since no freezing or refrigeration is needed when the patient takes the product home.”

The initiation of the Phase 1 study of RBX7455 enhances Rebiotix’s clinical pipeline of human microbiome-directed drug candidates. The Company’s lead drug candidate, RBX2660, recently completed a Phase 2b randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial examining the efficacy and safety of the microbiota restoration therapeutic as a prevention for recurrent C. diff. infection after a standard of care course of antibiotics (PUNCH™ CD2).

“Dosing the first patient in the Phase 1 study of RBX7455 is a significant milestone for Rebiotix as it solidifies our position as the most clinically advanced microbiome company in the industry, while showcasing the potential of our MRT platform to create new solutions for challenging diseases through standardized microbiota-based drug development,” stated Lee Jones, president and CEO of Rebiotix. ”

RBX7455 is a potentially ground-breaking product for Rebiotix and the entire microbiome industry in that the lyophilized oral capsules do not need to be kept frozen and thus can be stocked in a pharmacy with no special handling or storage needs. As such, RBX7455 offers the unique opportunity to introduce live microbial therapy as a potential treatment for numerous diseases where chronic or repeat dosing is required.”

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*Please note – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse any products and/or clinical study in progress. All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only. Thank You.

Rebiotix Is Issued U.S. Patent For Its Patent Application Entitled “Microbiota Restoration Therapy (MRT) Compositions and Methods Of Manufacture”

Rebiotix Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company focused on harnessing the power of the human microbiome to treat challenging diseases,  announced on October 11, 2016 that the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has issued U.S. Patent No. 9,433,651 to Rebiotix for its patent application entitled, “Microbiota Restoration Therapy (MRT), Compositions and Methods of Manufacture.” The patent covers Microbiota Restoration Therapy (MRT) compositions and methods for manufacturing, processing and delivering the compositions, and builds on Rebiotix’s patent issuances in Australia and Canada.

MRT is a standardized, stabilized drug technology that is designed to rehabilitate the human microbiome by delivering a broad spectrum of live microbes into a patient’s intestinal tract via a readyto-use and easy-to-administer format. The patented technology is based on ground-breaking work that provides an avenue for the treatment of a variety of diseases including Clostridium difficile (C.diff), ulcerative colitis, hepatic encephalopathy and multi-drug resistant organisms.

“This patent covering our MRT platform is a significant addition to Rebiotix’s IP estate as we continue to advance our industry-leading pipeline of microbiome-directed drug therapies, including RBX2660, our Phase 3-ready drug candidate,” stated Lee Jones, Chief Executive Officer of Rebiotix. “Rebiotix has established one of the deepest IP portfolios in the microbiome industry covering an array of subjects, from formulation and storage to delivery and disease targets, that we believe are key to the eventual commercialization of microbiota-based therapeutics.”

https://cdifffoundation.org/clinical-trials-2/

 

About Rebiotix Inc.

Rebiotix Inc. is a clinical-stage biotechnology company focused on harnessing the power of the human microbiome to revolutionize the treatment of challenging diseases. Rebiotix is the most clinically advanced microbiome company in the industry, with its Phase 3-ready drug candidate, RBX2660, having successfully completed a Phase 2b randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial as a potential treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (PUNCH™ CD2). RBX2660 has been granted Orphan Drug status, Fast Track status and Breakthrough Therapy Designation from the FDA for its potential to treat recurrent C. diff. infection.

Rebiotix’s development pipeline includes multiple formulations targeting several disease indications and is built around its pioneering Microbiota Restoration Therapy (MRT) platform. MRT is a standardized, stabilized drug technology that is designed to rehabilitate the human microbiome by delivering a broad spectrum of live microbes into a patient’s intestinal tract via a ready-to-use and easy-to-administer format. For more information on Rebiotix and its pipeline of human microbiome-directed therapies, visit www.rebiotix.com.

source:  Rebiotix