Tag Archives: C. diff nutrition

The Importance of Protein, More Than a Food

Protein is an important substance found in every cell in the human body. In fact, except for water, protein is the most abundant substance in your body. This protein is manufactured by your body utilizing the dietary protein you consume. It is used in many vital processes and thus needs to be consistently replaced. You can accomplish this by regularly consuming foods that contain protein.

Please Note: It is important to discuss daily dietary intake amounts of Protein with your Primary Care Physician and Health care Provider before changing diets. For patients being treated for any diagnosis involving the Renal System and Kidney function,  it is extremely important to discuss your daily dietary intake of Protein.    Obtaining a referral for a Dietary Consult to discuss Dietary Needs with a Registered Dietitian may also be recommended/suggested during illnesses to maintain balanced nutrition.  Please contact your healthcare insurance provider to determine medical benefits with Registered Dietitian visits prior to scheduling a visit.  Thank You.

When an individual is ill it is normal for appetites to decrease and when being treated for a C.difficile infection not only can the appetite decrease but the ability to tolerate a number of food groups can also occur.  Maintaining protein intake is important.

Why?  Protein is termed the building block of the body. It is called this because protein is vital in the maintenance of body tissue, including development and repair. Hair, skin, eyes, muscles and organs are all made from protein. This is also why children need more protein per pound of body weight than adults; they are growing and developing new protein tissue *consult with Pediatricians to discuss protein dietary needs in all children’s diets.

Protein is a major source of energy. If you consume more protein than you need for body tissue maintenance and other necessary functions, your body will use it for energy.

Protein is  also involved in the creation of some hormones. These substances help control body functions that involve the interaction of several organs.  For example: Insulin, a small protein, and is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. It involves the interaction of organs such as the pancreas and the liver. Secretin, is another example of a protein hormone. This substance assists in the digestive process by stimulating the pancreas and the intestine to create necessary digestive juices.

Let’s not forget enzymes that are proteins that increase the rate of chemical reactions in the body. In fact, most of the necessary chemical reactions in the body would not efficiently proceed without enzymes. For example, one type of enzyme functions as an aid in digesting large protein, carbohydrate and fat molecules into smaller molecules, while another assists the creation of DNA

Did you know that Protein is a major element in the transportation of certain molecules?  It is amazing that Protein has such a responsibility in our body maintenance.  Hemoglobin is a protein that transports oxygen throughout the body. Protein is also sometimes used to store certain molecules. Ferritin is an example of a protein that combines with iron for storage in the liver.

And Protein forms antibodies that help prevent infection, illness and disease. These proteins identify and assist in destroying antigens such as bacteria and viruses. They often work in conjunction with the other immune system cells. For example, these antibodies identify and then surround antigens in order to keep them contained until they can be destroyed by white blood cells.

Protein even has an important role in pH Balance — your bodily fluids (lbood, saliva, etc.)  function best at a neutral pH, or approximately 7.0. Many things that you encounter daily, such as foods, beverages and pollution, can change the pH of bodily fluids. A drastic and persistent change in pH can lead to chronic symptoms and various health problems.  The proteins in your body act as a buffers that help keep your pH neutral. When the pH of your blood becomes too acidic, the protein buffers in the blood will pick up hydrogen ions until the pH returns to neutral. If the pH becomes too high, or basic, protein buffers release hydrogen ions to lower the pH.

Protein is  in every single cell in your body – from your hair to your nails to your muscles and organs. These proteins are known as structural proteins; they quite literally provide the structure for your body. Without them, you could not walk, run or even stand. In fact, the most abundant protein in your body is collagen, which is present in skin, ligaments, tendons and bones.

Which foods contain Protein?

Protein food sources, such as animal products, contain all of the essential amino acids. Meat, poultry, fish, eggs and dairy are all considered complete proteins. If you consume two to three servings of these foods a day, you will meet your daily protein needs. Quinoa, a plant-based seed that is often called a grain, is also a complete protein and a healthy option if you do not want to eat animal foods. Soy products, like tofu, tempeh, edamame and soy milk, are other plant-based complete protein options.

What if you follow a vegetarian or vegan diet?

A vegetarian, you can consume complete protein foods by eating dairy products and eggs in addition to plant-based proteins. If you are a vegan, you can still get all the essential amino acids your body needs with careful meal planning. Just make sure you are eating a wide variety of plant-based incomplete protein foods. Healthy plant-based high-protein options include 1/4 cup of nuts like almonds, 1 to 2 cups of beans or lentils and 1/2 cup of quinoa.

What about Protein Powders?

There are a variety of protein powders on the market that come from  BOTH incomplete protein sources –  proteins from plant-based foods are typically considered incomplete proteins because they only contain some of the essential amino acids – and  complete protein sources – animal products, contain all of the essential amino acids. Meat, poultry, fish, eggs and dairy .

If you want a complete protein source powder  a good option is whey protein, which comes from dairy. A plant-based complete protein powder option is soy protein. Other plant-based protein powders include brown rice protein and pea protein. In order to get a plant-based complete protein with all of the essential amino acids, look for a powder that combines these two protein sources.

 

Protein Packed Chocolate Pudding

Ingredients

        1 Box 4 Serving Size – Instant Pudding (Chocolate Flavor or Vanilla Can Be Substituted).
      2 cups 2% Milk or 2 cups Soy Milk or Milk of your choice.

1 scoop whey protein (Whey Protein Powder Works Best For This Recipe).

Directions

Mix all three ingredients together following Box Pudding Directions. Divide Pudding into serving cups and refrigerate for at least four hours.
Nutrition Information  Per Box of Instant Pudding Mix:
  • Servings Per Recipe: 4
  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories: 112.0, Total Fat: 1.6 g,
  • Cholesterol: 6.1 mg
  • Sodium: 215.4 mg
  • Total Carbs: 10.2 g
  • Dietary Fiber: 0.5 g
  • Protein: 10.4 g

Good Reasons to Add Bananas Into a Healthy Diet

Did You Know that a banana gives an instant, sustained, and substantial boost of energy?

They do and bananas have healthy benefits for a lot of diets.

  • If you are allergic to bananas and banana products please do not add this food item into your diet.  Always speak with a healthcare professional prior to making changes in diets.  Thank you.

Bananas contain three natural sugars – sucrose, fructose, and glucose combined with fiber. And research has proven that just two bananas provide enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout.

How much potassium is in a banana? (4)

We are often asked ‘how much potassium is in a banana?’ Well, the average Chiquita banana contains about 422 mg of potassium (a little less than ½ a gram), making bananas a potassium superfruit—that’s 13% of the daily-recommended amount of potassium from only one Chiquita banana!

And did you know that the potassium in bananas stimulates your muscles, nerves and brain cells, and as a bonus, can also help reduce blood pressure and risk of stroke.

Get the Potassium You Need – Recommended Amounts per Age Group
With all of the incredible benefits of potassium in bananas, it’s no wonder the Chiquita banana is one of the first solid foods new moms feed their babies. The Food and Nutrition Center of the Institute of Medicine has recommended the following potassium amounts per day for infants, children and adults.

(1 banana = 0.422g of potassium)

Potassium for Infants:
0-6 months: 0.4 grams a day (g/day)
7-12 months: 0.7 g/day
Potassium for Children and Adolescents:
1-3 years: 3.0 g/day
4-8 years: 3.8 g/day
9-13 years: 4.5 g/day
14-18 years: 4.7 g/day
Potassium for Adults:
Age 19 and older: 4.7 g/day

Quick Protein Powder Banana Smoothie Recipe

Here’s a simple and delicious way to add protein to fresh fruit and juice.

 Ingredients:
  • 2   whole Bananas, sliced
  • Add  protein powder of choice, and for a smoother version add 3 oz. non fat , low sugar, Greek vanilla yogurt
  • 1/4   cup chilled Pineapple juice
  • 1/2   cup  of soy or coconut, or rice or *if not allergic to nuts – cashew or almond – milk.

Instructions for quick Protein Power Chiquita Banana Smoothie Recipe

Place all ingredients in a blender and puree until smooth. Serve immediately or place in a freezer safe container and freeze to make a frozen treat.

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Eating bananas can also help prevent a substantial number of illnesses and conditions when added to the daily diet.

  1. Anemia: High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and so help in cases of anemia.
  2. Depression: According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood, and generally make you feel happier. (2)
  3. Heartburn: Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body. When suffering from heartburn, try eating a banana for soothing relief.
  4. High Blood Pressure: This unique tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it perfect to beat high blood pressure. So much so, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has just allowed the banana industry to make official claims for the fruit’s ability to reduce the risk of high blood pressure and stroke. (3)
  5. Morning Sickness: Snacking on bananas between meals helps keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness.
  6. Nerves: Bananas are high in B vitamins, which help calm the nervous system.
  7. PMS: The vitamin B6 that bananas contain regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood.
  8. Stress: Potassium is a vital mineral, which helps normalize the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the brain, and regulates your body’s water balance. When we are stressed, our metabolic rate rises, thereby reducing our potassium levels. These can be re-balanced with the help of a high-potassium banana snack.  (2)
  9. Strokes: According to research in The New England Journal of Medicine, eating bananas as part of a regular diet can cut the risk of death by strokes by as much as 40%  (1)

(1) http://www.jwatch.org/na35633/2014/09/18/banana-day-stroke-prevention

(2) http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM195907022610104

(3) http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/beating-high-blood-pressure-with-food

(4) http://www.chiquitabananas.com/worlds-favorite-fruit/bananas-and-potassium.aspx

ProNourish ™ Nutritional Drink Information For Healthcare Professionals — For Patients With Food Intolerance And Digestive Discomfort

pronourish_main_img

*Please note – The
C Diff Foundation does not endorse any product and/or clinical study in progress. All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only. If you have questions, please contact the companies directly. Thank you.

 

FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS **

………………………

For Patients with Food Intolerance
ProNourish™ Nutritional Drink is a unique option for patients who suffer with digestive discomfort and are following an exclusion diet.

It was specifically formulated with the guidance of healthcare professionals to be compliant with a Low FODMAP Diet and is Low FODMAP Certified by Monash University. Monash University Low Fodmap Certified™
Benefits in every bottle:
Low in FODMAPs*
3 g of Fiber
15 g of High Quality Protein
25 Essential Vitamins and Minerals
Suitable for Lactose Intolerance**

NO Gluten
NO High Fructose Corn Syrup
NO Sugar Alcohols or Artificial Colors
NO Inulin
NO Fructooligosaccharides
ProNourish™ Nutritional Drink helps make following a Low FODMAP Diet easier by providing a balanced mini-meal or snack without the ingredients that might trigger symptoms of digestive discomfort. Its just one more way Nestlé Health Science strives to help nourish patients quality of life through the power of nutrition.
HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS ONLY: Order Free Samples!
For Your Patients
To get your FREE samples, use promo code PRON-13851-1016.

Find out more about ProNourish™ Drink at ProNourish.com

or visit LowFODMAPcentral.com

For information and handouts for your patients.

Stop by the ProNourish™ Drink booth during these upcoming events!

2016 Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo™ (FNCE®): October 16–18
(booth #2951)
2016 ACG American College of Gastroenterology Meeting: October 16–18
(booth #1114)

*Formulated to be low in specific carbs (called FODMAPs) that can be difficult for some people to digest.

**Not for individuals with Galactosemia.

Monash University Low FODMAP Certified™ trademarks used under license by Nestlé.

A strict Low FODMAP Diet should only be commenced under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

Simple and Basic Vegetable Soup Recipe Because “Soup Is Good Food”

Simple & Basic Vegetable Soup

Ingredients:

3 tablespoons butter

2 large carrots, peeled and diced

3 stalks celery, diced

1 (28 ounce) can whole peeled tomatoes, chopped, juice reserved

1 teaspoon dried parsley or fresh parsley

2 quarts Beef broth OR Vegetable broth OR Chicken broth

DIRECTIONS:

In a large pot over medium heat, melt the butter.

ADD the carrots and celery to the melted butter and cook until semi-soft.

Stir in tomatoes with their juice, and  parsley.

Pour in beef OR vegetable OR chicken  broth.

Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes, until vegetables are tender and flavors are well blended.

OPTIONS:

Add 1/2 cup of dry uncooked pasta noodles of choice to the broth and vegetables and cook for 20 minutes until soft

Add 1 cup of cooked chicken cut into cubes for added nutrition (protein) OR cooked beef cut into cubes/small pieces for added nutritional value.

soupchicken3

 

 

C. diff. News: A Canadian Acute Care Facility Implemented Intervention To Screen and Isolate Asymptomatic Clostridium difficile Carriers With Noted Decreased Incidence Of Health-Care Associated C. difficile Infection

C. diff. In The News

An intervention at a Canadian acute care facility to screen and isolate asymptomatic Clostridium difficile carriers was associated with decreased incidence of
health-care associated C. difficile infection
, a finding that needs to be confirmed in additional studies, according to a new study published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

C. difficile infection (CDI) is a major cause of health care-associated infection worldwide.
CDI can cause symptoms from mild diarrhea to life-threatening toxic megacolon. About half a million cases happen each year in the United States, causing 29,000 deaths and creating $4.8 billion in excess medical costs.

Infection control recommendations mainly focus on patients with CDI. But asymptomatic
C. difficile carriers may also play a role in disseminating spores because they can
contaminate the environment and caregivers’ hands, and because they are not detected are not placed under isolation precautions.

Yves Longtin, M.D., of the Jewish General Hospital and McGill University, Montreal, Canada, reports on the effects of the intervention to reduce the incidence of health care-associated CDI (HA-CDI)   at the Quebec Heart and Lung Institute, Quebec City, Canada.

The study, conducted between November 2013 and March 2015, screened patients at admission for the tcdB gene through a rectal swab and those found to be C. difficile carriers were put under contact isolation precautions during their hospitalization.

Among the 7,599 patients who were screened, 368 (4.8 percent) were identified as C. difficile carriers and placed under isolation. During the intervention, the incidence rate of HA-CDI decreased by more than 50 percent to 3.0 per 10,000 patient days compared to 6.9 per 10,000 patient days before the intervention. The authors estimate the intervention prevented approximately 63 cases.

Limitations of the study include the intervention was conducted at a single center and the findings still need to be confirmed in additional studies.

The authors note that the strategy to screen and isolate C. difficile carriers may be cost-effective. The intervention cost $130,000 (U.S.) and prevented 63 cases; the estimated savings from averting CDI cases was greater than the cost of the intervention.

“The intervention is simple and could be easily implemented in other institutions. If confirmed in subsequent studies, isolating asymptomatic carriers could potentially prevent thousands of cases of HA-CDI every year in North America,” the study concludes.

Commentary: Active Surveillance, Isolation of Asymptomatic Carriers of Clostridium difficile at Hospital Admission

“The results of this study are promising for reducing HA-CDI. … Longtin et al have shown the possible benefit of using active surveillance testing and isolation of asymptomatic carriers for preventing HA-CDI. Larger, well-designed studies, such as cluster randomized trials, are ultimately needed to confirm the effectiveness of this strategy,” writes Alice Y. Guh, M.D., M.P.H., and L. Clifford McDonald, M.D., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta.

TO ACCESS ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY:

Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by The JAMA Network Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Yves Longtin, Bianka Paquet-Bolduc, Rodica Gilca, Christophe Garenc, Elise Fortin, Jean Longtin, Sylvie Trottier, Philippe Gervais, Jean-François Roussy, Simon Lévesque, Debby Ben-David, Isabelle Cloutier, Vivian G. Loo. Effect of Detecting and IsolatingClostridium difficileCarriers at Hospital Admission on the Incidence ofC difficileInfections. JAMA Internal Medicine, 2016; DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0177
  2. Alice Y. Guh, L. Clifford McDonald. Active Surveillance and Isolation of Asymptomatic Carriers ofClostridium difficileat Hospital Admission. JAMA Internal Medicine, 2016; DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.1118

Cite This Page:

The JAMA Network Journals. “Effort to detect, isolate asymptomatic C. difficile carriers linked to lower incidence.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 April 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160425141547.htm

Sweet Potato vs White Potato — Time To Make A Switch

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Besides simple starches, raw sweet potatoes are rich in complex carbohydrates, dietary fiber and beta-carotene (a provitamin A carotenoid), while having moderate contents of other micronutrients, including vitamin B5, vitamin B6 and manganese (table). When cooked by baking, small variable changes in micronutrient density occur to include a higher content of vitamin C at 24% of the Daily Value per 100 g serving (right table)]

The Center for Science in the Public Interest ranked the nutritional value of sweet potatoes as highest among several other foods.

Sweet potato varieties with dark orange flesh have more beta-carotene than those with light-colored flesh, and their increased cultivation is being encouraged in Africa where vitamin A deficiency is a serious health problem. A 2012 study of 10,000 households in Uganda found that children eating beta-carotene enriched sweet potatoes suffered less vitamin A deficiency than those not consuming as much beta-carotene. (1)

Benefits of Sweet Potato:

  • Sweet potato is one of the high calorie starch foods (provide 90 calories/100 g vis a vis to 70 calories/100 g in potato). The tuber, however, contains no saturated fats or cholesterol, and is rich source of dietary fiber, anti-oxidants, vitamins, and minerals than potatoes.
  • Its calorie content mainly comes from starch, a complex carbohydrate. Sweet potato has higher amylose to the amylopectin ratio than that in potato. Amylose raises the blood sugar levels rather slowly on comparison to simple fruit sugars (fructose, glucose etc) and therefore, recommended as a healthy food item even in diabetes.
  • The tuber is an excellent source of flavonoid phenolic compounds such as beta-carotene and vitamin-A. 100 g tuber provides 14,187 IU of vitamin A and 8,509 µg of ß-carotene, a value which is the highest for any root-vegetables categories. These compounds are powerful natural antioxidants. Vitamin A is also required for the human body to maintain integrity of mucus membranes and skin. It is a vital nutrient for healthy vision. Consumption of natural vegetables and fruits rich in flavonoids helps protect from lung and oral cavity cancers.
  • The total antioxidant strength of raw sweet potato measured in terms of oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) is 902 µmol TE/100 g.
  • The tubers are packed with many essential vitamins such as pantothenic acid (vitamin B-5), pyridoxine (vitamin B-6), and thiamin (vitamin B-1), niacin, and riboflavin. These vitamins are essential in the sense that the human body requires them from external sources to replenish. These vitamins function as co-factors for various enzymes during metabolism.
  • Sweet potato provides good amount of vital minerals such as iron, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and potassium that are very essential for enzyme, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism.
  • Sweet potato top greens are indeed more nutritious than the tuber itself. Weight per weight, 100 g of fresh leaves carry more iron, vitamin C, folates, vitamin K, and potassium but less sodium than its tuber.  (2)

Simple Baked Potato Recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 large sweet potatoes
  • 2 pinches salt

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Coat the bottom of a glass or non-stick baking dish with olive oil, just enough to coat.
  2. Wash and peel the sweet potatoes. Cut them into medium size pieces. Place the cut sweet potatoes in the baking dish and turn them so that they are coated with the olive oil. Sprinkle moderately with oregano, and salt and pepper (to taste).  The potatoes can also be mashed at this time for easier digestion.  (3)

 

Resource: 

(1)  Sweet Potato Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweet_potato

(2)  Sweet Potato Benefits:   http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/sweet_potato.html

(3)  Baked Sweet Potato Recipe:  Allrecipe.com :     http://allrecipes.com/recipe/18249/baked-sweet-potatoes/print/?recipeType=Recipe&servings=4

Season’s Greetings From the C Diff Foundation

 

 

CdiffHolidayFront 001
There is no time more fitting to say thank you and Season’s Greetings from all of us at
The C Diff Foundation and to wish you a Happy Holiday Season.

 

 

Special wishes are being sent out  to the many patients and families who have witnessed or have been diagnosed with a C. difficile infection;  May you have a New Year of restored health, support, hope, and renewed happiness.

Warm wishes,
The C Diff Foundation Members

C Diff Foundation Board of Directors:

Nancy C Caralla, Scott Battles, Dr. Ahmed A. M. Al Mandalawi, MD,
Tiffani M. Eberflus, Rowaland R. Dory, Angelo Ortiz

Mental Health Advisory Committee
Lesa Bridges, LCSW, MSW, Chairperson

Research and Development Committee
Dr. Martha R. Clokie, MS, PhD
Dr. Simon Cutting, MS,PhD, Chairperson
Dr. David Cook, MS, PhD
Dr. Rahma Wehelie, PhD
Dr. Hudson Garrett, Jr., PhD, MSN, MPH, FNP, CSRN, VA-BC, CDONA,FACONA,DON-CLTC™, C-NAC™, PLNC

Medical Advisory Board:
Dr. Mark Wilcox, MD, Chairperson
Dr. Rosie Lyles, MD
Dr. Sadeq A. Quraishi, MD

C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program:
Dr. Paul Feuerstadt, MD, Medical Advocate
Dr. Caterina Oneto, MD, Medical Advocate
Lisa Hurka-Covington – MD Support Leader
Scott Battles – MO Support Leader
Karen Factor, RD- FL Support Leader
Roy Poole, CO Support Leader

Pediatric Support, Research and Development Committee
Tiffani Eberflus, LPN, Chairperson

C Diff  Volunteer Advocate Program
Angelo Ortiz, Chairperson

Marketing and Graphic Arts Committee
Anthony DelMonaco, Marketing VP
Joel Davis, BS, Chairperson

Nutrition Wellness
Karen Factor, RD, MS, Chairperson

Biologic Research and Development Committee 
Michael Kaleko, MD, PhD, Senior Vice President, Reseaerch & Development Synthetic Biologics
Joseph Sliman, MD, MPH, Senior Vice President, Clinical & Regulatory Affairs, Synthetic Biolgics
Andy Bristol, PhD, Vice President, Research & Development, Synthetic Biologics