Tag Archives: Homecare

Simple and Basic Vegetable Soup Recipe Because “Soup Is Good Food”

Simple & Basic Vegetable Soup

Ingredients:

3 tablespoons butter

2 large carrots, peeled and diced

3 stalks celery, diced

1 (28 ounce) can whole peeled tomatoes, chopped, juice reserved

1 teaspoon dried parsley or fresh parsley

2 quarts Beef broth OR Vegetable broth OR Chicken broth

DIRECTIONS:

In a large pot over medium heat, melt the butter.

ADD the carrots and celery to the melted butter and cook until semi-soft.

Stir in tomatoes with their juice, and  parsley.

Pour in beef OR vegetable OR chicken  broth.

Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes, until vegetables are tender and flavors are well blended.

OPTIONS:

Add 1/2 cup of dry uncooked pasta noodles of choice to the broth and vegetables and cook for 20 minutes until soft

Add 1 cup of cooked chicken cut into cubes for added nutrition (protein) OR cooked beef cut into cubes/small pieces for added nutritional value.

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A Good Night’s Sleep Can Be a Challenge Without Adding An Illness

Sleep Can Be A Challenge—-

Insomnia — the lack of adequate sleep, with the challenges in altered health can leave one feeling tired all the time. There are many things you can do to help you get a good night’s sleep.

Here are a few ideas to gain the sleep you need:

  • Follow a regular sleep schedule. Go to sleep and get up at the same time each day, even on weekends. Try to avoid napping in the late afternoon or evening, as it may keep you awake at night.  Also use the restroom before turning in to avoid those middle of the night visits  to the bathroom.
  • Develop a bedtime routine. Take time to relax before bedtime each night. Some people watch television, read a book, listen to soothing music.
  • Keep your bedroom dark, not too hot or too cold, and as quiet as possible.
  • Have a comfortable mattress, a pillow you like, and enough blankets for the season.
  • Exercise at regular times each day but not within 3 hours of your bedtime.
  • Make an effort to get outside in the sunlight each day – even if it means standing out the front door or on the balcony for at least fifteen minutes a day. Natural Vitamin D is beneficial.
  • Be careful about when and how much you eat later in the day. Large meals close to bedtime may keep you awake, but a light snack in the evening can help you get a good night’s sleep.
  • Avoid caffeine – not only does it promote a fluid shift and can cause bowel elimination,  Caffeine (found in coffee, tea, soda, and hot chocolate) can also keep you awake.
  • Drink fewer beverages in the evening. Waking up to go to the bathroom and turning on a bright light break up your sleep.
  • Remember that alcohol won’t help you sleep. Even small amounts make it harder to stay asleep.
  • After turning off the light, give yourself about 20 minutes to fall asleep. If you’re still awake and not drowsy, get out of bed and try to relax in another comfortable area. When you feel sleepy, go back to bed and try again.

Fighting a cold or Flu can also disrupt a good night’s sleep.  Try using extra pillows to elevate your head, keep the room a bit cooler, having a box of tissues near the bedside with a trash container near the bed will also help, and a glass or bottle of water near the bedside will also alleviate a visit to the kitchen for a drink when attempting to fall asleep.

Sufficient sleep is increasingly being recognized as an essential aspect of chronic disease prevention and health promotion. How much sleep is enough? Sleep needs vary from person to person and change as people age. (1)

Consider these sleep guidelines for different age groups.

How much sleep do you need?

Newborns

  • 16-18 hours

Preschool-aged Children

  • 11-12 hours

School-aged Children

  • At least 10 hours

Teens

  • 9-10 hours

Adults (including older adults)

  • 7-8 hours

Sleep-related difficulties – typically called sleep disorders – affect many people. Major sleep disorders include:

  • Insomnia – an inability to fall or stay asleep that can result in functional impairment throughout the day.
  • Narcolepsy – excessive daytime sleepiness combined with sudden muscle weakness; episodes of narcolepsy are sometimes called “sleep attacks” and may occur in unusual circumstances.
  • Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) – an unpleasant “creeping” sensation associated with aches and pains throughout the legs that can make it difficult to fall asleep.
  • Sleep Apnea – interrupted sleep caused by periodic gasping or “snorting” noises or momentarily suspension of breathing.

If you or someone you know is experiencing a sleep disorder, it may be important to receive an evaluation by a healthcare provider.

We hope this information has been helpful in providing you with suggestions on how to combat sleepless nights and improve your health – even during an illness.

For more information visit the CDC’s website http://www.cdc.gov/Features/Sleep/

 

(1) http://www.cdc.gov/Features/Sleep/

C. difficile Infection (CDI) C Diff Foundation Opens a New Avenue – C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program

CdiffForRelease-1

The C Diff Foundation introduces the  C. diff. Nationwide Community Support (CDNCS) program beginning in November  for patients, families, survivors and for anyone seeking information and support.

C. difficile (C. diff.) infections caused almost half a million infections among patients in the United States in a single year, according to a 2015 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In addition, an estimated 15,000 deaths are directly attributable to C. difficile infections, making them a substantial cause of infectious disease death in the United States. [i].

As of 2015, there is an absence of professional C. diff. (CDI) support groups in America. The          C Diff Foundation has pioneered a collaborative plan and developed support groups in a variety of availability and locations to meet the needs of individuals seeking C. diff. information and support.

“We found it to be of the utmost importance to implement this new pathway for support and healing after speaking with numerous patients, family members, and fellow-C. diff. survivors,”

We now speak for the thousands of patients within the United States who, each year, are diagnosed with a C. diff. infection. This growth, in part, reflects the value C. diff. support groups will provide, not only to patients, their spouses, and families who are living with and recovering from a C. diff. infection, but also to the countless number of individuals who will become more aware of a C. diff. infection, the importance of early detection, appropriate treatments, and environmental safety protocols. There will also be Bereavement support group sessions for   C. diff. survivors mourning the loss of loved ones following their death from C. diff. infection involvement.

Beginning November 2015 the CDNCS groups will be available to all individuals via: Teleconferencing with some groups advancing and adding computer application programs in 2016. CDNCS groups will provide support and information  to 15 participants in each session.

The CDNCS program sessions will be hosted via: Teleconferencing with leaders hosting from Maryland, Florida, Missouri, Colorado, Ohio, and Oregon.

The Colorado CDNCS group is offered at a public venue and will be hosted in Arvada, Colo. every third Tuesday of each month, beginning November 17th. The Meeting will start at 5:30 p.m. and end at 7 p.m lead by a C Diff Foundation Volunteer Advocate and C. diff. survivor          Mr. Roy Poole.

To participate in any CDNCS group being offered during each month, all interested participants will be asked to register through the Nationwide Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) or through the   website https://cdifffoundation.org/ where registered individuals will receive a reply e-mail containing support group access information.

  • The Support Registration Page  will be available on November 1st.

The C. diff. Nationwide Community Support group leaders will provide a menu of topics being shared each month on the C Diff Foundation’s website ranging from Financial Crisis Relief, Bereavement, Nutrition, Mental Health, to C. diff. infection updates and everyday life during and after being treated for a prolonged illness. Teleconference sessions will also host healthcare professional topic experts

There is evidence that people who attend support group meetings have a better understanding of the illness and their treatment choices. They also tend to experience less anxiety, develop a more positive outlook, and a better ability to cope and adapt to life during and after the treatment for C. diff.

There is a Purpose:

A diagnosis of a C. diff. infection is unexpected and almost always traumatic. As a result, it is not uncommon for newly diagnosed patients to experience a wide range of emotions including, confusion, bewilderment, anger, fear, panic, and denial. Many people find that just having an opportunity to talk with another person, who has experienced the same situation, to help alleviate some of the anxiety and distress they commonly experience.

Individuals also find that they benefit not only from the support they receive, but also from the sense of well-being they gain from helping others. It has been said “support is not something you do for others but rather something you do with others.”

“None of us can do this alone – all of us can do this together.”

 

Follow the C Diff Foundation on Twitter @cdiffFoundation #cdiff2015 and                                        Facebook https://www.facebook.com/CdiffFoundationRadio.

Note/citation: [i] http://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/biggest_threats.html