Tag Archives: C. diff. prevention

Clorox Healthcare® VersaSure™ Cleaner Disinfectant Wipes Introduced

Patented alcohol-free quat technology with the versatility to use throughout healthcare settings with broad-spectrum disinfection

 

 

Clorox Healthcare is proud to announce the latest addition to its industry-leading portfolio of healthcare disinfectants: new Clorox Healthcare® VersaSureCleaner Disinfectant Wipes, an innovative, alcohol-free quat solution versatile enough to use on common healthcare surfaces with the assurance of broad-spectrum disinfection.

Clorox Healthcare® VersaSureCleaner Disinfectant Wipes are Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered to kill 44 pathogens, including bacteria, viruses and fungi, in two minutes or less. The unique, low odor, low residue formula features patented technology that enhances quat activity on surfaces to deliver broader efficacy and faster kill times without co-actives. The result is a versatile, one-step cleaner disinfectant wipe with the speed and efficacy healthcare facilities rely on and superior aesthetics, wetness and cleaning power needed for convenient, compliant use facility-wide.

Clorox Healthcare® VersaSureCleaner Disinfectant Wipes’ innovative new formula provides:

  • Speed and Strength Against Key Pathogens: VersaSure is EPA-registered to kill 44 microorganisms, including 14 multi-drug resistant pathogens, in two minutes or less. VersaSure kills influenza viruses, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), measles, mumps and other viruses in 30 seconds1 and kills bacteria and fungi, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE), Escherichia coli (E. coli), salmonella, mycobacterium bovis (TB) and Candida albicans, in two minutes.
  • Excellent Aesthetics and Cleaning Power: Patented alcohol-free quat technology and innovative wipe design combine to provide excellent aesthetics, wetness and cleaning power. The low residue formula is designed for superior staff and patient comfort with no harsh chemical fumes or odors. Durable, low-linting wipes are textured for greater strength. Excellent wetness provides greater surface coverage compared with competitor quat and quat-alcohol disinfectant wipes and assurance that treated surfaces will remain wet for the full contact time.
  • Convenient, Compatible Use: VersaSure wipes are ready-to-use, fast acting and compatible with a broad range of hard, non-porous surfaces found in healthcare settings. A variety of sizes, including multipurpose wipes in 85 and 150 count canisters and 30 count flat packs, and terminal wipes for everyday cleaning and disinfecting of large spaces, available in 110 count buckets and refill pouches, makes VersaSure convenient for both nurses and environmental services teams to use facility-wide.

“Not all disinfectants are created equal and many don’t have the optimal balance of attributes to meet users’ needs. For example, a conventional quat or alcohol-based product might offer good compatibility, but have limited kill claims or evaporate from surfaces before meeting the required contact time,” says Brian Thompson, department manager – R&D, Clorox Healthcare. “We believe healthcare facilities shouldn’t have to make those trade-offs and with VersaSure, they don’t. Our R&D teams refused to make compromises between efficacy, aesthetics, wetness and cleaning power, and today we are excited to offer a one-step, ‘use everywhere’ wipe with broad-spectrum efficacy healthcare facilities can trust.”

Building the Industry’s Most Innovative, Comprehensive Portfolio of Disinfecting Solutions

In the fight against infections, today’s healthcare facilities need proven solutions to kill a broad range of pathogens, from seasonal threats like influenza and deadly pathogens like Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), to community-associated MRSA and new threats posed by emerging viral pathogens. Clorox Healthcare offers the industry’s most robust portfolio of EPA-registered surface disinfectants in addition to advanced UV technology, as well as cleaning and odor removal products to provide healthcare facilities, nurses and EVS professionals with a comprehensive portfolio of best-in-class solutions to help reduce the risk of infections and keep patients, staff, visitors and the broader community safe.

Clorox Healthcare understands that safeguarding healthcare environments requires advanced and evolving solutions. VersaSure joins products like Clorox Healthcare® Fuzion Cleaner Disinfectant, a new type of bleach that combines disinfecting efficacy against tough-to-kill pathogens like C. difficile spores with broad surface compatibility,

Clorox Healthcare® Bleach Germicidal Wipes and Clorox Healthcare® Hydrogen Peroxide Cleaner Disinfectants in a class of ready-to-use disinfectants that are tough on pathogens and optimized for surface compatibility, aesthetics, ease-of-use and patient and staff comfort to enable broad use, promote compliance and enhance safety facility-wide.

“At Clorox Healthcare, we are constantly innovating and working to expand the depth and breadth of our industry-leading portfolio, both by pushing the envelope with new product development and constantly striving for improvement to ensure that the mainstay surface disinfectants healthcare facilities depend on continue to meet the highest standards of efficacy and evolving needs of real-world healthcare environments,” says Lynda Lurie, director – marketing, Clorox Healthcare. “The expansion of our portfolio with the launch of VersaSure, brings us one step closer to our goal of removing the environment from the infection prevention equation.”

About Clorox Healthcare
Building on a century-long legacy in cleaning and disinfecting, Clorox Healthcare offers a wide range of products to help stop the spread of infection in healthcare facilities. From comprehensive surface disinfection to advanced ultraviolet technology, we are committed to providing efficacious solutions to the healthcare community. For more information, visit www.CloroxHealthcare.com or follow @CloroxHealth on Twitter.

1Kills rotavirus in two minutes.

 

Clorox Healthcare logo (PRNewsFoto/Clorox Professional Products Co.)

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SOURCE Clorox Healthcare

Read more at https://www.thecloroxcompany.com/release/#tHkDJjKXBYteXfXg.99

Study Show 9% Fewer Antibiotics Prescribed

The use of antibiotics among Americans with commercial health insurance has decreased during the past several years, according to a new analysis that nevertheless
shows lingering variations for different ages and in different parts of the country.

The study released provides the latest evidence of how doctors and patients have begun to heed warnings that excessive antibiotic use breeds dangerous drug resistance and “superbug” bacteria.

The analysis is based on 173 million insurance claims from people under age 65 with Blue Cross Blue Shield coverage
who filled prescriptions
between 2010 and 2016.

 

It is a sequel of sorts to research by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which found a smaller decline and comparable age and geographic variations.

The CDC reported a 5 percent decrease overall between 2011 and 2014 in antibiotic prescriptions written in outpatient settings such as doctors’ offices, clinics and hospital emergency rooms.

The study by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association found that 9 percent fewer antibiotics prescribed in outpatient settings were filled in 2016, compared with 2010.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Blue Cross Blue Shield Study:

https://www.bcbs.com/the-health-of-america/reports/antibiotic-prescription-rates-declining-in-the-US?utm_source=social&utm_medium=linkedin&utm_content=&utm_campaign=hoa-antibiotics

 

To read more of this article please click on the link provided below:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2017/08/24/fewer-antibiotic-prescriptions-are-being-filled-a-new-analysis-finds/?utm_term=.d30b61b8fae7

SYN-004 (ribaxamase) For C. difficile Prevention Advances; U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Has Granted A Breakthrough Therapy Designation

On May 11, 2017 Synthetic Biologics, Inc. a late-stage clinical company developing therapeutics that preserve the microbiome to protect and restore the health of patients, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted a Breakthrough Therapy Designation for SYN-004 (ribaxamase) for the prevention of Clostridium difficile infection.

SYN-004 (ribaxamase) is the Company’s first-in-class oral enzyme designed to protect the gut microbiome from disruption caused by certain intravenous (IV) beta-lactam antibiotics.

The Breakthrough Therapy Designation is based on data from the successful Phase 2b clinical trial of ribaxamase, which met its primary endpoint of significantly reducing CDI. FDA Breakthrough Therapy Designation is intended to expedite development and review timelines when preliminary clinical evidence indicates that a drug may demonstrate substantial improvement on one or more clinically significant endpoints over available therapies for serious or life threatening diseases. If approved by the FDA, SYN-004 (ribaxamase) would be the first available drug designed to prevent Clostridium difficile infection by protecting the gut microbiome from antibiotic-mediated dysbiosis.

“We are delighted by the FDA’s recognition of ribaxamase’s potential to prevent CDI, and the dire need to fill the current void of an approved intervention,” said Jeffrey Riley, President and Chief Executive Officer. “Following this announcement, we have been asked and anticipate requesting a Type-B multidisciplinary meeting with the Agency for a comprehensive discussion on the overarching, high-level drug development plan and pathway to licensure for ribaxamase. We look forward to working closely with the FDA throughout the development and review process and remain dedicated to bringing this potentially paradigm-shifting approach to antibiotic therapy to patients in critical need.”

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C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network 

www.cdiffradio.com

Protecting the Gut Microbiome: A Paradigm Shift in Managing GI Disorders

Live Broadcast On Tuesday, May 16th Join us with our guest, Dr. Joseph Sliman, MD, MPH, Chief Medical Officer of Synthetic Biologics.  Dr. Sliman will be discussing  the protection of the natural gut microbiome from the unintended consequences of intravenous (IV) antibiotics which are excreted into the gut is expected to protect against opportunistic enteric infections. Synthetic Biologics is developing two microbiome-focused drug candidates in Phase 3 development including, SYN-004 (ribaxamase) which is designed to protect the gut microbiome by degrading certain IV beta-lactam antibiotics for the prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), pathogenic
overgrowth and the emergence of antimicrobial resistance, and SYN-010 which is intended to reduce the impact of methane producing organisms in the gut microbiome to treat an underlying cause of irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C).

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To learn more about Synthetic Biologics, please click on the link provided below

.http://www.syntheticbiologics.com/about/overview

Source:  Synthetic Biologics

Synthetic Biologics – Protecting the Gut Microbiome: A Paradigm Shift in Managing GI Disorders

Researchers Suggest a Portion Of C. diff. Cases In Europe Involve Infections Associated With Other Sources Outside of Healthcare-Associated Infections

As part of a multicenter study, investigators from the University of Oxford, the University of Leeds, Astellas Pharma Europe, and elsewhere used a combination of ribotyping, sequencing, phylogenetics, and geographic analyses to retrace the genetic diversity and potential sources of C. difficile isolates involved in infections in European hospitals.

Recent research suggests a proportion of Clostridium difficile cases in Europe involve not only hospital-acquired infections but also infections associated with other sources, such as food.

As stated in the article:

https://www.genomeweb.com/sequencing/clostridium-difficile-genetic-patterns-europe-point-possible-infection-sources-beyond?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=GWDN%20Mon%20PM%202017-04-24&utm_term=GW%20Daily%20News%20Bulletin

David Eyre, a clinical lecturer at the University of Oxford, was slated to present the work at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases annual 2017 meeting in Vienna this past weekend. The study was funded by Astellas Pharma’s Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA) program.

“We don’t know much about how C. difficile might be spread in the food chain, but this research suggests it may be very widespread,” Eyre said in a statement. “If that turns out to be the case, then we need to focus on some new preventative strategies such as vaccination in humans once this is possible, or we might need to look at our use of animal fertilizers on crops.”

“This study doesn’t give us any definitive answers,” he explained, “but it does suggest other factors [than hospital infections] are at play in the spread of C. difficile and more research is urgently needed to pin them down.”

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Some of the strains clustered by locale, consistent with spread from one individual to the next, for example in a healthcare setting. But more unexpectedly, the team also saw strains smattered across seemingly unconnected sites. And because at least one of those strains had previously been linked to pig farming, the researchers speculated that some infections may have been transmitted through food sources.

 

To read the article in its entirety click on the following link:

https://www.genomeweb.com/sequencing/clostridium-difficile-genetic-patterns-europe-point-possible-infection-sources-beyond?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=GWDN%20Mon%20PM%202017-04-24&utm_term=GW%20Daily%20News%20Bulletin

Clostridium difficile Vaccines In Trials Reviewed by Larry K. Kociolek, MD and Stanford T. Shulman, MD

CDI is not only observed in hospitalized patients and patients with antibiotic exposure but also in populations previously thought to be at low risk, such as healthy young adults and children. Community-associated CDI has also emerged as an important cause of diarrheal illness.4,5 The spectrum of CDI ranges from asymptomatic carriage and mild diarrhea to life-threatening pseudomembranous colitis, toxic megacolon, and fulminant colitis potentially requiring urgent colectomy.4-6 Furthermore, long-term resolution of symptoms is difficult to achieve in a large percentage of patients with CDI; approximately 20% of patients with CDI experience recurrent infection after responding to initial therapy.2

To read the article in its entirety please click the link below:

http://www.infectiousdiseaseadvisor.com/clostridium-difficile/status-of-clostridium-difficile-vaccines/article/646015/

Although the pathophysiology of CDI is complex and multifactorial, toxin B (TcdB), a cytotoxin, is now thought to be the primary mediator of symptomatic infection. Toxin A (TcdA) and binary toxin (in particular strains such as epidemic strain BI/NAP1/027) are also likely to do so, but the extent to which they contribute to disease is unclear.5 A mature and varied intestinal microbiome confers resistance to colonization by C difficile, protecting against CDI.6 Thus, exposure to C difficile spores alone is rarely sufficient to cause CDI, while perturbation of the microbiome following antibiotic exposure permits C difficile spores to colonize, germinate, and release toxins that induce CDI symptoms.

Antibodies to TcdA and TcdB mediate protection against primary CDI and recurrences. High serum antitoxin levels, especially immunoglobulin G (IgG) antitoxin A, are associated with asymptomatic colonization and protection against CDI recurrence.7

Bezlotoxumab, a monoclonal antibody against TcdB recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), reduces the rate of CDI recurrence in adults.8 However, the protective effect of this passive immunization strategy is short-lived.

Vaccines appear to be a promising intervention that provides long-term protection against CDI episodes, and several are in various stages of development.6 There are 3 candidate vaccines currently undergoing phase 2 and 3 clinical evaluation for CDI prevention.6

The Sanofi Pasteur toxoid vaccine uses formalin-inactivated full-length TcdA and TcdB administered by intramuscular injection at days 0, 7, and 30. In phase 2 trials, the vaccine was safely administered to adults older than 50, and seroconversion to TcdA and TcdB was 97% and 92%, respectively.9 The high-dose adjuvanted vaccine, which is currently being evaluated in a phase 3 clinical trial, has demonstrated elevated circulating titers for up to 3 years after the last dose of the primary series given at 0, 7, and 30 days.10

Pfizer is currently evaluating a genetically modified and chemically treated recombinant full-length TcdA and TcdB vaccine in a phase 2 trial. In a phase 1 trial with 3 different dosages given as a 3-dose schedule in adults 50 to 85 years old, satisfactory immunogenicity and safety were demonstrated for both the aluminum hydroxide-adjuvanted and non-adjuvanted vaccine.11 Best responses were observed with the non-adjuvanted formulation, and there were no differences in responses in 50- to 64 year-old and 65- to 80 year-old subjects.

Valneva, an Austrian pharmaceutical company, is developing VLA84, a genetic fusion of the truncated cell-binding domains of TcdA and TcdB that is purported to be less complex to produce and purify compared with the toxoid vaccines. In a phase 1 trial, VLA84 was shown to be highly immunogenic in adults and the elderly without serious adverse effects.12 A phase 2 clinical trial has been completed, but data are not yet available.

All 3 of these parenteral candidate vaccines are moving forward in development and appear promising for the prevention of symptomatic CDI. An oral mucosal vaccine using a genetically engineered Bacillus subtilis vector is also in development.13 Because host immune response against non-toxin antigens may additionally protect against colonization and subsequent transmission, an alternative possibility of developing vaccines against surface proteins that prevent C difficile mucosal adherence and colonization is attractive. To this end, a number of surface-associated antigens including flagellar proteins, S-layer proteins, proteases, and complex polysaccharides have been studied in animal models as possible vaccine candidates.14

Larry K. Kociolek, MD, is the associate medical director of Infection Prevention and Control at The Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and assistant professor of Pediatrics at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Illinois.

Stanford T. Shulman, MD, is the medical director of Infection Prevention and Control at The Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and Virginia H. Rogers Professor of Pediatric Infectious Disease​ at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine​ in Illinois.

References

  1. Magill SS, Edwards JR, Bamberg W, et al; Emerging Infections Program Healthcare-Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Use Prevalence Survey Team. Multistate point-prevalence survey of health care-associated infections. N Engl J Med. 2014;370:1198-1208. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1306801
  2. Lessa FC, Mu Y, Bamberg WM, et al. Burden of Clostridium difficile infection in the United States. N Engl J Med. 2015;372:825-834. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1408913
  3. Dubberke ER, Olsen MA. Burden of Clostridium difficile on the healthcare system. Clin Infect Dis. 2012;55 Suppl 2:S88-S92. doi:10.1093/cid/cis335
  4. Chitnis AS, Holzbauer SM, Belflower RM, et al. Epidemiology of community-associated Clostridium difficile infection, 2009 through 2011. JAMA Intern Med. 2013;173:1359-1367. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.7056
  5. Kelly CP, Lamont JT. Clostridium difficile–more difficult than ever. N Engl J Med. 2008;359:1932-1940. doi:10.1056/NEJMra0707500
  6. Kociolek LK, Gerding DN. Breakthroughs in the treatment and prevention of Clostridium difficile infections. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2016;13:150-160. doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2015.220
  7. Kelly CP, Kyne L. The host immune response to Clostridium difficile. J Med Microbiol. 2011;60:1070-1079. doi:10.1099/jmm.0.030015-0
  8. Wilcox MH, Gerding DN, Poxton IR, et al; MODIFY I and MODIFY II Investigators. Bezlotoxumab for prevention of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. N Engl J Med. 2017;376:305-317. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1602615
  9. de Bruyn G, Saleh J, Workman D, et al; H-030-012 Clinical Investigator Study Team. Defining the optimal formulation and schedule of a candidate toxoid vaccine against Clostridium difficile infection: A randomized phase 2 clinical trial. Vaccine. 2016;34:2170-2178. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.03.028
  10. de Bruyn G, Glover R, Poling TL, et al. Three year follow up for safety and immunogenicity of a candidate Clostridium difficile toxoid vaccine. Presented at: IDWeek 2016. New Orleans, Louisiana; October 26-30, 2016. Poster 746.
  11. Sheldon E, Kitchin N, Peng Y, et al. A phase 1, placebo-controlled, randomized study of the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of a Clostridium difficile vaccine administered with or without aluminum hydroxide in healthy adults. Vaccine. 2016;34:2082-2091. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.03.010
  12. Bezay N, Ayad A, Dubischar K, et al. Safety, immunogenicity and dose response of VLA84, a new vaccine candidate against Clostridium difficile, in healthy volunteers. Vaccine. 2016;34:2585-2592. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.03.098
  13. Permpoonpattana P, Hong HA, Phetcharaburanin J, et al. Immunization with Bacillus spores expressing toxin A peptide repeats protects against infection with Clostridium difficile strains producing toxins A and B. Infect Immun. 2011;79:2295-2302. doi:10.1128/IAI.00130-11
  14. Ghose C, Kelly CP. The prospect for vaccines to prevent Clostridium difficile infection. Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2015;29:145-162. doi:10.1016/j.idc.2014.11.013
DISCLAIMER
“The C Diff Foundation’s mission is to educate and advocate for Clostridium difficile infection prevention, treatments, support, and environmental safety worldwide.
 
The C Diff Foundation’s organization is comprised of 100% volunteering members who are dedicated to our mission and adhere to the Foundation’s Code of Ethics
which prohibits the endorsement and promotion of products, services, medications, or clinical studies in progress. 
 
All website entries, public presentations, and workshops are to raise C. diff. infection awareness in all areas of the C Diff Foundation’s mission statement, including infection prevention, sepsis, healthcare-associated infections, antimicrobial resistance, antibiotic stewardship and provide education on all the above.”

C. diff. and Clorox Bleach Germicidal Cleaners and Wipes Update

Now there’s one C. diff contact time for CLOROX entire Bleach Germicidal lineup.  CLOROX Bleach Germicidal Cleaners and Wipes update  October 13, 2016 *
  CLOROX improved disinfection claims across their full portfolio of Bleach Germicidal Cleaners and Wipes. In fact, now they’re all EPA-registered to kill C. diff in just 3 minutes.
Clorox Professional Products Company
Here’s what’s new.*
One C. diff contact time for both Wipes and Cleaners:
Now our entire Bleach Germicidal line kills C. diff in 3 minutes, to simplify your infection control protocols.
Now EPA-registered to kill outbreak-causing viruses:
Enterovirus D68, Influenza A and B viruses, Measles Virus, MERS-CoV, Norovirus and SARS-CoV
Clorox Professional Healthcare Products
Trusted by over 2,000 US hospitals.
CLOROX Bleach Germicidal Cleaners and Wipes make it easier for you to safeguard patient environments against HAI and outbreak-causing pathogens. See why these ready-to use bleach disinfectants are trusted by more than 2,000 US hospitals as part of their infection control protocols.

 

 

*Please note – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse any product and/or clinical study in progress.  All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only.   If there are questions, please contact the company directly.  Thank you.

C. diff. News: A Canadian Acute Care Facility Implemented Intervention To Screen and Isolate Asymptomatic Clostridium difficile Carriers With Noted Decreased Incidence Of Health-Care Associated C. difficile Infection

C. diff. In The News

An intervention at a Canadian acute care facility to screen and isolate asymptomatic Clostridium difficile carriers was associated with decreased incidence of
health-care associated C. difficile infection
, a finding that needs to be confirmed in additional studies, according to a new study published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

C. difficile infection (CDI) is a major cause of health care-associated infection worldwide.
CDI can cause symptoms from mild diarrhea to life-threatening toxic megacolon. About half a million cases happen each year in the United States, causing 29,000 deaths and creating $4.8 billion in excess medical costs.

Infection control recommendations mainly focus on patients with CDI. But asymptomatic
C. difficile carriers may also play a role in disseminating spores because they can
contaminate the environment and caregivers’ hands, and because they are not detected are not placed under isolation precautions.

Yves Longtin, M.D., of the Jewish General Hospital and McGill University, Montreal, Canada, reports on the effects of the intervention to reduce the incidence of health care-associated CDI (HA-CDI)   at the Quebec Heart and Lung Institute, Quebec City, Canada.

The study, conducted between November 2013 and March 2015, screened patients at admission for the tcdB gene through a rectal swab and those found to be C. difficile carriers were put under contact isolation precautions during their hospitalization.

Among the 7,599 patients who were screened, 368 (4.8 percent) were identified as C. difficile carriers and placed under isolation. During the intervention, the incidence rate of HA-CDI decreased by more than 50 percent to 3.0 per 10,000 patient days compared to 6.9 per 10,000 patient days before the intervention. The authors estimate the intervention prevented approximately 63 cases.

Limitations of the study include the intervention was conducted at a single center and the findings still need to be confirmed in additional studies.

The authors note that the strategy to screen and isolate C. difficile carriers may be cost-effective. The intervention cost $130,000 (U.S.) and prevented 63 cases; the estimated savings from averting CDI cases was greater than the cost of the intervention.

“The intervention is simple and could be easily implemented in other institutions. If confirmed in subsequent studies, isolating asymptomatic carriers could potentially prevent thousands of cases of HA-CDI every year in North America,” the study concludes.

Commentary: Active Surveillance, Isolation of Asymptomatic Carriers of Clostridium difficile at Hospital Admission

“The results of this study are promising for reducing HA-CDI. … Longtin et al have shown the possible benefit of using active surveillance testing and isolation of asymptomatic carriers for preventing HA-CDI. Larger, well-designed studies, such as cluster randomized trials, are ultimately needed to confirm the effectiveness of this strategy,” writes Alice Y. Guh, M.D., M.P.H., and L. Clifford McDonald, M.D., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta.

TO ACCESS ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY:

Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by The JAMA Network Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Yves Longtin, Bianka Paquet-Bolduc, Rodica Gilca, Christophe Garenc, Elise Fortin, Jean Longtin, Sylvie Trottier, Philippe Gervais, Jean-François Roussy, Simon Lévesque, Debby Ben-David, Isabelle Cloutier, Vivian G. Loo. Effect of Detecting and IsolatingClostridium difficileCarriers at Hospital Admission on the Incidence ofC difficileInfections. JAMA Internal Medicine, 2016; DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0177
  2. Alice Y. Guh, L. Clifford McDonald. Active Surveillance and Isolation of Asymptomatic Carriers ofClostridium difficileat Hospital Admission. JAMA Internal Medicine, 2016; DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.1118

Cite This Page:

The JAMA Network Journals. “Effort to detect, isolate asymptomatic C. difficile carriers linked to lower incidence.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 April 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160425141547.htm